MPT - 104329

Kakoli C Female, 45 Years

Associated for 4 Years 10 Months
Ensuring students' success for 10+ years
English Speaking Tutor

Activity Score - 734

  • Total Experience:
    10 Years
  • Hourly Fees:
    INR 250
Tutoring Experience :

To describe myself in one sentence: I am an EXPERT tutor of IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, PTE Academic, Spoken English, Grammar, GD-PI, Soft Skills classes; someone who is looking for new challenges in the teaching world.     I have been imparting online teaching to students of India and abroad for more than 10 years. Language learning and teaching are my passion. Grammar is my strength and I can very well explain the same.   Language learning is not an easy process, but I have the capability to teach in an interactive and fun way providing tips to remember vocabulary and grammar at the same time.

Tutoring Option :
I Can Manage Both
Tutoring Approach :

I am Kakoli Chakraborty. I am a certified TESOL trainer & have completed Masters in English. If you check my profile here or anywhere else, I am the #1 tutor.   I have been teaching Spoken English, Grammar, Writing Skills, IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, PTE, GCSE English for over 10 years to students all over the world both online & offline via Skype. I also impart training in Personality Development, Neutral Voice & Accent Training, Resume Writing, Telephone Skills & other courses for 10+ years.   I am very dedicated and  sincere in my teachings, making sure that students can grasp every lesson thoroughly. My experience and  proficiency in teaching English helped me garner positive reviews from all my students. I can assure you that with the quality of coaching, amount of study materials and  student friendly interaction, you will definitely learn proper English and  will really be able to master it.    I also provide individual guidance & my timings are flexible; can be arranged to suit mutually preferred time. For those who are giving exams like IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, be assured that you are going to score great marks - due to vast study material & expert teaching methodology. That has been the case till now and will keep on happening.   If you are interested, contact me. If you wish, I can give you a free 10 minutes demo class over Skype.

Teaches:
Class 11 - 12 English All Boards All Medium INR 100 / Hour
English Speaking TOEFL IELTS Spoken English Effective Communication INR 250 / Hour
Test Preparation PTE INR 250 / Hour
MBA & BBA MBA Entrance BBA Entrance INR 300 / Hour
Study Abroad GRE TOEFL IELTS PTE INR 250 / Hour
  • Question: What is Group 77 ?

    Posted in: Social Studies | Date: 06/11/2015

    Answer:

    The Group of 77 (G-77) was established on 15 June 1964 by seventy-seven developing countries signatories of the “Joint Declaration of the Seventy-Seven Developing Countries” issued at the end of the first session of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) in Geneva. Beginning with the first “Ministerial Meeting of the Group of 77 in Algiers (Algeria) on 10 – 25 October 1967, which adopted the Charter of Algiers”, a permanent institutional structure gradually developed which led to the creation of Chapters of the Group of 77 with Liaison offices in Geneva (UNCTAD), Nairobi (UNEP), Paris (UNESCO), Rome (FAO/IFAD),Vienna (UNIDO), and the Group of 24 (G-24) in Washington, D.C. (IMF and World Bank). Although the members of the G-77 have increased to 134 countries, the original name was retained due to its historic significance.

  • Question: What is meant by sustainability of development ?

    Posted in: Social Studies | Date: 06/11/2015

    Answer:

    Sustainability can be defined as the practice of reserving resources for future generation without any harm to the nature and other components of it .Sustainable development ties together concern for the carrying capacity of natural systems with the social, political, and economic challenges faced by humanity. Sustainability science is the study of the concepts of sustainable development and environmental science. There is an additional focus on the present generations' responsibility to regenerate, maintain and improve planetary resources for use by future generations.

  • Answer:

    Lime stone is mostly used in the cement and lime industry.

    Limestones used as raw material in the lime industry are pure limestones with high content of CaCO3 (>90 %). Some types of limestones – meeting additional (mainly chemical) criteria – are also used in chemical, iron and steel and sugar industries. When used in the manufacture of cement clinker, they should be supplemented with addition of clay raw materials. Marly limestones and marls are useful in the cement industry and the CaCO3 content can be lower than 80 % but other chemical ingredients contents are quite important.

  • Question: Why are transactions made in money ?

    Posted in: Social Studies | Date: 06/11/2015

    Answer:

    (i) A person holding money can easily exchange it for any commodity or service that he or she might want.

    (ii) Thus, everyone prefers to receive payments in money and then exchange the money for things that they want.

    (iii) Take the case of a shoe manufacturer. He wants to sell shoe in the market and buy wheat. The shoe manufacturer will first exchange shoe that he has produced for money, and then exchange the money for wheat.

  • Question: Can you help me to understand the meaning of Cyclotron?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 12/11/2015

    Answer:

    A cyclotron is a type of particle accelerator in which charged particles accelerate outwards from the center along a spiral path. The particles are held to a spiral trajectory by a static magnetic field and accelerated by a rapidly varying (radio frequency) electric field.

  • Answer:

    A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term "laser" originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation".

  • Question: Kindly define Ultrasonics.

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 12/11/2015

    Answer:

    Acoustic frequencies between 16 kHz and 1 GHz are referred to as ultrasound; in industrial settings we call it “ultrasonics”. To clarify: people are able to hear frequencies between 16 Hz and 20 kHz; i.e. the lower frequencies of industrial ultrasonics are audible, especially if secondary frequencies are generated.

  • Answer:

    Three major differences between CVs and resumes are the length, the purpose and the layout. A resume is a brief summary of your skills and experience over one or two pages, a CV is more detailed and can stretch well beyond two pages. The resume will be tailored to each position whereas the CV will stay put and any changes will be in the cover letter.

  • Answer:

    Diamagnetism refers to materials that are not affected by a magnetic field.

    Paramagnetism refers to materials like aluminum or platinum which become magnetized in a magnetic field but their magnetism disappears when the field is removed.

    Ferromagnetism refers to materials (such as iron and nickel) that can retain their magnetic properties when the magnetic field is removed.

  • Answer:

    Many important geographical factors involved in the location of individual industries are of relative significance, e.g., availability of raw materials, power resources, water, labour, markets and the transport facilities.

     

    But besides such purely geographical factors influencing industrial location, there are factors of historical, human, political and economic nature which are now tending to surpass the force of geographical advantages. Consequently, the factors influencing the location of industry can be divided into two broad categories i.e.

    (I) Geographical factors, and

    (II) Non-geographical factors.

  • Answer:

    Minimata Reservoir

  • Answer:

    Jayaprakash Narayan

  • Question: Which is the smallest country (in population) ?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 13/11/2015

    Answer:

    Vatican City loses out to the Pitcairn Islands for the title of smallest country. Compared to the 800-850 residents who live in Vatican City, the population of the Pitcairn Islands has fluctuated between 40 and 60 inhabitants over recent years.

  • Question: Who is known as ‘father of computer’ ?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 13/11/2015

    Answer:

    Charles Babbage

  • Question: Who wrote the poem ‘Tintern Abbey’ ? Please tell me.

    Posted in: English | Date: 13/11/2015

    Answer:

    Walter de Clare

  • Answer:

    12 schedules.

    Schedules are lists in the Constitution that categorize and tabulate bureaucratic activity and policy of the Government.

  • Answer:

    13

  • Question: What is WAN?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 13/11/2015

    Answer:

    A wide area network (WAN) is a telecommunications network or computer network that extends over a large geographical distance. Wide area networks often are established with leased telecommunication circuits.

  • Question: What is meant by Human Security?

    Posted in: History | Date: 14/11/2015

    Answer:

    Human security is an emerging paradigm for understanding global vulnerabilities whose proponents challenge the traditional notion of national security by arguing that the proper referent for security should be the individual rather than the state.

  • Answer:

    The definition of business environment means all of the internal and external factors that affect how the company functions including employees, customers, management, supply and demand and business regulations. An example of a part of a business environment is how well customers' expectations are met.

  • Answer:

    Causes for forest depletion in India are:

    • Depletion of forests on an extensive scale was carried out in the colonial period. The beginning and the expansion of railways during this period led to the destruction of huge chunks of forests.
    • In independent India, clearing of forest land for the purpose of cultivation has also led to the depletion of forest cover in the country.
    • Timber has become an important commercial resource. It is used for building and making furniture. The felling of the trees for the purpose of obtaining timber is an important cause of reduced forest cover in India.
    • Many forests have been cleared for the purpose of building large scale dams in the country. For example, the building of Sardar Sarovar Dam in Gujarat and the Narmada Valley Project has resulted in the loss of forest lands in India.
    • Rapid Industrialization, urbanisation and expansion of cities has also led to the destruction of forest cover in the country.
    • Animal grazing, mining, collection of fire wood in rural areas are some other reasons of forest depletion in the country. Many people regard the practice of shifting cultivation also as a reason of destruction of forest cover in India. However it has to be noted that tribals practice it for satisfying their minimum basic needs. Depletion of forest is caused mainly due to the commercial use of timber, expansion of agriculture and the construction of large dams.

  • Answer:

    The divisional structure is a type of organizational structure that groups each organizational function into a division. These divisions can correspond to either products or geographies.

  • Answer:

    On the basis of the definition of planning, the features of planning can be identified as follows

    1. Planning is a process rather than behavior at a given point of time. This process determines the future course of action.

    2. Planning is future oriented It is primarily concerned with looking into future. It requires forecasting of future situation in which the organization has to function. Therefore, correct forecasting of future situation leads to correct decisions about future course of actions.

    3. Planning involves selection of suitable course of action. This means that there are several alternatives for achieving a particular objective or set of objectives. However, all of them are not equally feasible and suitable for the organization.

    4. Planning is undertaken at all levels of the organization because all levels of management are concerned with the determination of future course of action. However, its role increases at successively higher levels of management. Moreover, planning at different levels may be different in the context that at the top management level, managers are concerned about the totality of the organization and tries to relate it with the environment white-managers at lower levels may be involved in internal planning.

    5. Planning is flexible as commitment is based on future conditions, which are always dynamic. As such, an adjustment is needed between the various factors and planning.

     

  • Question: What connections does Microsoft SQL Server support?

    Posted in: C# (C Sharp) | Date: 15/11/2015

    Answer:

    TRUSTED & UNTRUSTED CONNECTION.

    1. SQL Server Authentication 2. Windows Authentication

  • Question: What is confederation?

    Posted in: Political Science | Date: 24/12/2015

    Answer:

    Confederation is an organization which consists of a number of parties or groups united in an alliance or league.

  • Answer:

    •Spare production capacity: If there is plenty of spare capacity then a business can increase output without a rise in costs and supply will be elastic in response to a change in demand. The supply of goods and services is most elastic during a recession, when there is plenty of spare labour and capital resources. •Stocks of finished products and components: If stocks of raw materials and finished products are at a high level then a firm is able to respond to a change in demand - supply will be elastic. Conversely when stocks are low, dwindling supplies force prices higher because of scarcity •The ease and cost of factor substitution/mobility: If both capital and labour are occupationally mobile then the elasticity of supply for a product is higher than if capital and labour cannot easily be switched. E.g. a printing press which can switch easily between printing magazines and greetings cards. Or falling prices of cocoa encourage farmers to switch into rubber production •Time period and production speed: Supply is more price elastic the longer the time period that a firm is allowed to adjust its production levels. In some agricultural markets the momentary supply is fixed and is determined mainly by planting decisions made months before, and also climatic conditions, which affect the production yield. In contrast the supply of milk is price elastic because of a short time span from cows producing milk and products reaching the market place.

  • Answer:

    Demand Loan In a demand loan account, the entire amount is paid to the debtor at one time, either in cash or by transfer to his savings bank or current account. No subsequent debit is ordinarily allowed except by way of interest, incidental charges, insurance premiums, expenses incurred for the protection of the security etc. Repayment is provided for by instalment without allowing the demand character of the loan to be affected in any way. There is usually a stipulation that in the event of any instalment, remaining unpaid, the entire amount of the loan will become due. Interest is charged on the debit balance, usually with monthly rests unless there is an arrangement to the contrary. No cheque book is issued. The security may be personal or in the form of shares, Govt. paper, fixed deposit receipt, life insurance policies, goods, etc. 2. Term Loan When a loan is granted for a fixed period exceeding three years and is repayable according to the schedule of repayment, it is known as a term loan. 3. Overdraft An overdraft is a fluctuating account wherein the balance sometimes may be in credit and at other times in debit. Overdraft facilities are allowed in current accounts only. 4. Cash Credit A cash credit is essentially a drawing account against credit granted by position to do so.

  • Question: What is a land - locked country?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 05/01/2016

    Answer:

    A landlocked state or country is a sovereign state entirely enclosed by land, or whose only coastlines lie on closed seas. There are currently 48 such countries, including four partially recognised states. Only two, Bolivia andParaguay in South America, lie outside Afro-Eurasia (the Old World).

    Eg. Liechtenstein in Europe is surrounded by two landlocked countries; Switzerland and Austriawhile Uzbekistan in Asia is surrounded by five, all of them are stan countries (ending with "stan"). They are Afghanistan, Kazakhstan,Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan andTurkmenistan.

  • Question: What does the term 'double circulation' mean?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 05/01/2016

    Answer:

    The majority of mammals (including humans) utilize a double circulatory system. This means that we have two loops in our body in which blood circulates. One is oxygenated, meaning oxygen rich, and the other is deoxygenated, which means it has little to no oxygen, but a lot of carbon dioxide.

  • Answer:

    It's necessary to match the donor and recipient blood types to prevent hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), clot formation, renal failure, and death. If blood types are incorrectly mixed, the antibodies of one may attack the antigens of the other.  For example, type A blood contains A angtigens on the surface and anti-B antibodies. Type B blood contains B antigens on the surface and anti-A antibodies. If type A blood is donated to a recipient of type B blood, the recipient's anti-A antibodies will attack the type A's A antigens. Red blood cells will be destroyed and the host's body will develop blood clots, release toxins that will result in death.  Type O blood can generally be given to anyone. It's known as the "universal donor" because it contains A and B antibodies but NO antigens. The recipient's body will accept the blood. However, type O blood can ONLY receive type O blood. Otherwise, it's anti-A and anti-B antibodies will attack the received blood.  Type AB blood can generally receive any blood type. It's known as the "universal recipient." Type AB has both A and B antigens but no antibodies. Therefore, it accepts any antigens. However, type AB blood can only be donated to another person of type AB blood. Otherwise, the host's anti-A and/or anti-B antibodies will attack the A and/or B antigens of the AB blood. 

  • Answer:

    WBC - have a nucleus, come in different forms ( granular, agranular, lobed)  RBC - have no nucleus, have only one form ( biconcave disc shapes). ( however, structure is changed by sickle cell anaemia).

  • Question: Is it possible for blood to clot under the skin?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 05/01/2016

    Answer:

    Yes, it is possible for blood to clot under the skin. Our skin contains a vast number of tiny blood capillaries; which upon any internal injury, begins to rupture. Blood is released as a result & clots are formed. Eg. dengue, malaria etc.

  • Question: What are the results of the First World War?

    Posted in: History | Date: 05/01/2016

    Answer:

    The results of the World War 1 may be summed up as follows:

    First, the World War I ended up with the defeat of the Central Powers under the leadership of Germany.

    Second, the World War I also saw the collapse of four Empires-German, Austrian, Turkish and Russian.

    Third, the World War I paved the way for the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia.

    Fourth, Russia withdrew from the War by signing the Treaty of Breast-Litovsk by which she had to accept harsh terms dictated by Germany.

    Fifth, another important result of the World War I was the triumph of democracy in Europe. Democratic governments were established in different countries of Europe.

    Sixth, as a result of the World War I the trade-union movement started in different countries at a large scale. The labour became actively conscious about their rights.

  • Question: What is the overall balanced equation for photosynthesis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 05/01/2016

    Answer:

    Photosynthesis is the process in plants and certain other organisms that uses the energy from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose (a sugar) and oxygen.

    The overall balanced chemical equation for the reaction is:

    6 CO2 + 6 H2O → C6H12O6 + 6 O2 

    Where: CO2 = carbon dioxide  H2O = water light is required C6H12O6 = glucose O2 = oxygen

     

  • Answer:

    FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE SOUTH ASIAN CLIMATE

    •LATITUDE is the angular distance north and south of the equator and is measured in degrees along ameridian as on map or globe.

    •Latitude directly influences the amount of solar energy reaching any point on the

    earth’s surface over the

    course of the year.

    •The earth is divided into four latitude zones:1.

    The tropical zone lies between 23.5 degrees north and 23.5 degrees south of the equator and receivesabundant solar energy throughout the year. In this zone, the sun is directly overhead the moon.They have tropical climates

    dry and rainy.

    2.The subtropical zone lies between 23.5 degrees to 35 degrees north and south of the equator. This zonehas significant variations in the amount of energy received from the sun. The sun is high overhead and thesolar energy is very high in June and in July in the northern hemisphere and is very high in December andin January in the southern hemisphere.

    3.The mid-latitude zone lies between 35 degrees and 55 degrees and experiences a sharp seasonality.During summer, the sun is high in the sky and the hours of daylight are long and the solar energy isabundant. During winter, the sun is low in the sky and days are short because the solar energy is in shortsupply.These are places between the Arctic and the Tropic of Cancer and between the Tropic of Capricorn andthe Antarctic Circle. The countries in these regions have temperate climate and marked seasonal changes.

     

    4. The high-latitude zone lies above 55 degrees latitude; the summer sun never gets overhead. In winter,the sun barely rises above the horizon even at noon.The high latitude climates or the Frigid Zone are areas in the High Latitude have polar climates.Temperatures in these latitudes are always cold and never warm. The average temperature of thewarmest month is below 10C.

    Frigid Zone - area beyond Arctic or Antarctic Circles: either of two areas of the Earth's surface, one lyingbetween the Arctic Circle and the North Pole, the other lying between the Antarctic Circle and the SouthPole.

    Oceanicity

    The degree to which a point on the earth's surface is in all respects subject to the influence of the sea; it isthe opposite of continentality; oceanicity usually refers to climate and its effects; one measure for thischaracteristic is the ratio of the frequencies of maritime to continental types of air mass. Also known as oceanity.

  • Answer:

    The western part of northern plain experiences continental type of climate. In these areas, the summers are very hot & winters are very cold. The air is generally devoid of moisture.

    On the eastern side, the winters are mild while the summers are hot with much moisture in the air.

    The coastal regions experience an equitable type of climate.

  • Answer:

    The light-independent reactions (the "dark" reactions) - occur in the stroma.

  • Question: What is the Balfour Declaration 1917?

    Posted in: History | Date: 09/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Balfour Declaration was a short letter by Arthur Balfour to arguably one of the most influential Jewish families – the Rothschild’s. It was assumed that the letter gave the British government’s support to the creation of a Jewish homeland.

  • Question: What is the difference between cell and tissue?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2016

    Answer:

                                      Cell                                                                  Tissue

    Definition

    Cells are smallest unit of life.                                                       Group of like minded cells.

    Components

    Mitochondria, Golgi bodies, lysosomes, ribosomes, nucleus, etc.                  Similar cells

    Types

    Eukaryotic Cell And Prokaryotic Cell             Epithelial tissue, nerve tissue, muscle tissue, and connective tissue.

    Developmental processes

    Mitosis or meiosis                                        Tissue repair through regeneration and fibrosis

    Functions

    Growth, metabolism, creation, and protein synthesis.            Group of similar cells come together to perform a similar                                                                                            function and to form organs.

     

  • Question: What was Operation Barbarosa?

    Posted in: History | Date: 09/01/2016

    Answer:

    Operation Barbarossa was the name given to Nazi Germany’s invasion of Russia on June 22nd 1941. Barbarossa the largest military attack of World War Two and was to have appalling consequences for the Russian people.

  • Answer:

    Demersal fish are bottom feeders. They can be contrasted with pelagic fish which live and feed away from the bottom in the open water column.Demersal fish fillets contain little fish oil (one to four percent), whereaspelagic fish can contain up to 30 percent.

  • Question: What is commutation?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 09/01/2016

    Answer:

    Daily movement of people between any two places between two cities, towns or even between the centre part and periphery of the city is called commutation.

  • Answer:

    Plasmolysis

  • Question: Who is the head of the Municipal Corporation?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Mayor

  • Question: Under what pretext was Oudh annexed by the British?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Doctrine Of Lapse

  • Question: What is the term of office of the Gram Panchayat?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Five years

  • Question: What is the main condition for membership of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The OPEC Secretariat (hereinafter “OPEC”) aims to contribute to public knowledge by disseminating information about its activities. The use of the data, analysis and any other information (hereinafter the “Material”) contained on this website constitutes an agreement between OPEC and the reader (hereinafter the “User”) under the Terms and Conditions herein stipulated.

     

  • Question: What are the disadvantages of the red soil?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The disadvantages of red soil are-  (i) The red soil is thin, poor, porous and has loose gravel.  (ii) And it is also poor in lime, phosphate, nitrogen and humus.

  • Question: With which crop 'retting' is associated?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Jute

  • Question: What is the difference between sensory and motor neuron?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Motor neurons are cells that carry information from the central nervous system to the muscles and glands, while sensory neurons send signals from body parts to the central nervous system. Sensory neurons are found over the body, such as in the skin, ears, eyes, nose and tongue. Interneurons in the central nervous system allow information to flow between motor and sensory neurons

  • Question: Why is millet called a 'dry crop'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Millets are known as dry crops because they are tough & hardy crops. They are drought resistant crops which need high temperatures (27-32 C) & little rainfall (50 cm-100 cm).

  • Question: What is the symptom and cause of myopia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Myopia Symptoms and Signs

    If you are nearsighted, you typically will have difficulty reading road signs and seeing distant objects clearly, but will be able to see well for close-up tasks such as reading and computer use.

    Other signs and symptoms of myopia include squinting, eye strain and headaches. Feeling fatigued when driving or playing sports also can be a symptom of uncorrected nearsightedness.

    If you experience these signs or symptoms while wearing your glasses or contact lenses, schedule acomprehensive eye examination with your optometrist or ophthalmologist to see if you need a stronger prescription.

  • Question: What is the symptom and cause of myopia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    What Causes Myopia?

    Myopia occurs when the eyeball is too long, relative to the focusing power of the cornea and lens of the eye. This causes light rays to focus at a point in front of theretina, rather than directly on its surface.

    Nearsightedness also can be caused by the corneaand/or lens being too curved for the length of the eyeball. In some cases, myopia is due to a combination of these factors.

    Myopia typically begins in childhood and you may have a higher risk if your parents are nearsighted. In most cases, nearsightedness stabilizes in early adulthood but sometimes it continues to progress with age.

  • Question: Why are capillaries thin walled?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    A single capillary is so small that it allows only one blood cell to flow through it at a time. The capillary walls are also very small, only one cell thick. These thin walls easily allow water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and other nutrient and waste substances to exchange between blood cells and the surrounding tissue.

  • Answer:

    Function

    It is normally pointed upward during breathing with its underside functioning as part of the pharynx, but during swallowing, elevation of thehyoid bone draws the larynx upward; as a result, the epiglottis folds down to a more horizontal position, with its superior side functioning as part of the pharynx. In this manner it prevents food from going into the trachea and instead directs it to the esophagus, which is at the back. Should food or liquid enter the windpipe due to the epiglottis failing to close properly, the gag reflex is induced to protect the respiratory system.

  • Answer:

    Location

    The epiglottis is a flap made of elastic cartilage tissue covered with a mucous membrane, attached to the entrance of the larynx

  • Question: What are the main objectives of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    OPEC's objective is to co-ordinate and unify petroleum policies among Member Countries, in order to secure fair and stable prices for petroleum producers; an efficient, economic and regular supply of petroleum to consuming nations; and a fair return on capital to those investing in the industry.

  • Question: Who founded the Theosophical Society?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Helena Blavatsky

  • Answer:

    1.The moderates and the extremists  joined together.  2. The Congress and Muslim league  Co-operated with each other to achieve                  self Government  3. It was at this session Jawaharlal Nehru met Gandhiji for the first time.

  • Question: With which crop 'ginning' is associated?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Cotton

  • Question: What is 'crop rotation'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Crop rotation is one of the oldest and most effective cultural control strategies. It means the planned order of specific crops planted on the same field. It also means that the succeeding crop belongs to a different family than the previous one. The planned rotation may vary from 2 or 3 year or longer period.

  • Answer:

    Plantation crops constitute a large group of crops. The major plantation crops include coconut, arecanut, oil palm, cashew, tea, coffee and rubber; the minor plantation crops include cocoa.

  • Answer:

    Importance of Plantation Crops:

    The term Plantation crops refers to those crops which are cultivated on an extensive scale in a large contiguous area, owned and managed by an Individual or a company. The crops include tea, coffee, rubber, cocoa, coconut, arecanut, oil palm, palmyrah, cashew, cinchona etc. These plantation crops are high value commercial crops of greater economic importance and play a vital role in our Indian economy. The main draw back with this sector: of crops in India is that major portion of the area is of small holdings (except Tea) which hinders the adoption of intensive cultivation. In the case of coffee 97.13 per cent of the growers have holdings below ten hectares and in Rubber, 82 per cent of the total area is of small hojdings having an average size of 0.5 ha.

    The Economic Importance of these Crops are:

    1. They contribute to national economy by way of export earnings. These crops occupy less than 2 per cent of the total cultivated area (i.e. 3.82 per cent of total crop land) but they generate an income of around Rs. 16,000 million or about 12.72 per cent of the total export earnings of ail commodities or 75 per cent of total earnings from the export of agricultural produces.

    2. India is the leading country in the total production of certain plantation crops in the world. For instance, our production meets the share of 47 per cent in tea and 66 per cent in each of cashew and arecanut,

    3. Plantation industry provides direct as well as indirect employment lo many millions of people. For instance, tea industry offers direct employment to 10 lakhs and indirect employment to 10 lakh people, while-cashew processing factories alone provide employment to 3 lakhs people besides 2 lakhs farmers are employed in cashew cultivation.

    4. Plantation industry supports many by-product industries and also many rural industries. For example, coconut husk is used to produce coir fiber annually to a tune of 2,19,600 tones in India.

    5. These crops help to conserve the soil and ecosystem. Tea planted in hill slopes and cashew in barrel and waste lands protect the land from soil erosion during the rainy season or due to heavy winds.

    Area of Plantation Crops in India:    The area and production is more in Kerala (1073000.7 ha and 4359000.9 MT) followed by Karnataka (679000.2 ha and 1401000.0 MT), Tamil Nadu (503000.0 ha and 3810.6 MT), Andhra Pradesh (289000.0 ha/and 1021000.2 MT).

  • Question: In which year and by whom was the 'August Offer' made?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    On 8 August 1940, early in the Battle of Britain, the Viceroy of India, Lord Linlithgow, made the so-called August Offer, a fresh proposal promising the expansion of the Executive Council to include more Indians, the establishment of an advisory war council, giving full weight to minority opinion, and the recognition of Indians' right to frame their own constitution (after the end of the war). In return, it was hoped that all parties and communities in India would cooperate in Britain's war effort.

  • Answer:

    (1) The whole of India including the Princely States should form a Federation.

     

    (2) The Central Government should be in charge of foreign affairs, defence and communication.

    (3) The provinces and the states should enjoy all other powers.

    (4) The British Indian Provinces and the territories should be divided into three groups, the first group should contain Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, Sind and Baluchistan. The second group should contain Bengal and Assam. The third group should contain the rest of the Provinces.

    These first two groups should contain the Muslim majority areas and the third group the Hindu areas.

    (5) A Constituent Assembly should be elected to frame a constitution for the Indian Union.

    (6) The three groups of Provinces should also possess their separate constitution.

    (7) A Province should have the right to leave the Union in future if it so liked after elections under its new constitutions.

    (8) There should be an Interim National Government with leaders of the Indian parties to take charge of the administration.

     

  • Question: What were the consequences of the Truman Doctrine?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    On 22 May 1947, President Harry Truman signed the formal “Agreements on Aid to Greece and Turkey,” the central pillars of what became known as the “Truman Doctrine.” Though the principles of the policy were first articulated in a speech to a joint session of Congress on 12 March 1947, it took two months for Truman to line up the funding for Greece and Turkey and get the legislation passed through Congress.

    In his March address, Truman reminded his audience of the recent British announcement — a warning, really — that they could no longer provide the primary economic and military support to the Greek government in its fight against the Greek Communist Party, and could not prevent a spillover of the conflict into Turkey. Truman asserted that these developments represented a seismic shift in post-war international relations. The United States, he declared, had to step forward into a leadership role in Europe and around the world. Nations across the globe, as he put it, were confronted with an existential threat. They thus faced a fundamental choice about whether or not states “based upon the will of the majority” with government structures designed to provide “guarantees of individual liberty” would continue. If unsupported in the face of anti-democratic forces, a way of life “based upon the will of a minority [might be] forcibly imposed upon the majority”, a government orientation which he contended depended on “terror and oppression.”

    Ultimately, the “foreign policy and the national security of this country,” Truman reasoned, were at stake in the global conflict over democratic governance and thus in the particular tenuous situations confronting Greece and Turkey.

    The fates of the two states were intertwined. Both nations had received British aid,  he said. If Turkey and Greece faltered, or “fell” to communists, then the stability of the Middle East would be at risk; thus US assistance also was “necessary for the maintenance of [Turkey’s] national integrity.”

    The President therefore made the ambitious proposal that was elemental to his “doctrine”: thereafter “it must be the policy of the United States to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures.” Truman requested $400 million in assistance for the two nations, in a move that many at the time — and most subsequent scholarship — depicted as marking a sort of de facto onset of the Cold War.

    While transformative, the precise significance of Truman’s speech is a subject of debate. As historian John Lewis Gaddis has argued, “despite their differences, critics and defenders of the Truman Doctrine tend to agree on two points: that the President’s statement marked a turning point of fundamental importance in the history of American foreign policy; and that US involvement in the Vietnam War grew logically, even inevitably, out of a policy Truman thus initiated.”

    However, Truman’s speech and authorization of funding on which the principles depended was neither a subtle nor a decisive shift toward the strategy of containment as many later politicians and scholars have surmised. As Martin Folly observes in a superb piece on Harry Truman in the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History: “It is easy to see the Marshall Plan for European economic recovery as following directly from the Truman Doctrine.” Folly goes on to note that this association is wrong. There is little evidence to support a claim that Truman or his powerful then-Undersecretary of State Dean Acheson conceived of the Doctrine as a first step toward, for instance, the measured but firm anti-Soviet resolution showed in the US response to the Berlin Crisis (in the form of the Berlin airlift) nor was the doctrine directly linked to the Marshall Plan as it developed in the year to come. However, as Folly suggests, the Doctrine “reflect[s] Truman’s own approach to foreign affairs as it had evolved, which was that the United States needed to act positively and decisively to defend its interests, and that those interests extended well beyond the Western Hemisphere.”

    The major ideological shift represented by the Truman Doctrine and the aid to Greece and Turkey its its simultaneous rejection of the long-standing injunction to “steer clear of foreign entanglements” and an embrace of a heightened expansion of a sphere of influence logic. For the first time in US history, the nation’s peacetime vital interests were extended far outside of the Western Hemisphere to include Europe and, indeed, much of the world. According to Truman, it is “the policy of the United States to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures.”

    This new logic of pro-active aid and intervention to support “vital interests” (always hotly contested, continually open to interpretation) worldwide undergirds the ways in which the United States continues to debate the nation’s internationalist as well as unilateralist options abroad in Ukraine, Libya, Syria, Afghanistan, Nigeria, and elsewhere.

    Wherever one stands on debates over the “proper” US role in the world and contemporary geopolitical challenges, the antecedents are clear. After 1947 American national security—and foreign relations more broadly — were no longer premised on a limited view of protecting the political and physical security of US territory and citizens. Instead, the aid agreement signed on 22 May 1947 clinched a formalized US commitment to (selectively) assist, preserve, intervene, and/or reshape the political integrity, structures, and stability of non-communist nations around the world. The consequences of this aid agreement were profound for the early Cold War and for the shape of international relations in the world today.

  • Question: Who started the Non-Aligned Movement?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Jawaharlal Nehru of India, Sukarno of Indonesia, Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia, Gamal Abdul Nasser of Egyptand Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana

  • Question: Why small-sized land holding in India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The average size of operational land holdings has reduced by half from 2.28 ha in 1970-71 to 1.16 ha in 2010-11 (Graph I). Consequently, the number of land holdings in the marginal and small categories have swelled by 56 million and 11 million respectively, during the same period (Graph 2).

  • Question: Which factors helped in the growth of Nationalism?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Many causes contributed to the emergence of the nationalist movement in India. They were as follows:

    1. British Imperialism:

    The British imperialism was the most important factor, which contributed to the rise of nationalism in India. It made the geographical unification of the country possible. Before the advent of the British, the people of the south were usually separate from the rest of India except for some short inter­vals. The British imperialism made the people to think as one nation.

    2. Influence of the Western Civilization:

    The establishment of British rule in India made closer relations with the Western world possible. Thus, the contacts with the European countries influenced the Indians immensely. The nineteenth century in Europe was the century of nationalism and liberalism. The Indians came to learn their lessons from the Europeans on both these ideologies.

    Indians imbibed the ideas of nationalism and liberalism from the Western countries particularly from Germany, Italy, Greece, and Belgium. Besides this, the ideas of Western think­ers namely, Macaulay, Burke, Bentham, Mill, Spencer, Rousseau, and Voltaire also inspired and encouraged the ideas of independence among the Indians. Thus, there was a growth of political consciousness and awakening among the Indians.

    3. Spread of English Language:

    There was a rapid spread of English education in India especially after the revolt of 1857. The second half of the nineteenth century was a golden age of Liberalism in Europe, particularly England. The study of the political classics of English literature from Milton to Mill planted in the minds of English-educated Indians the seeds of liberalism in its two aspects—nationalism and democracy.

    Thus with the spread of English education, the educated Indians gradually became politically conscious. The British introduced the English lan­guage in India with their own selfish interest in mind. At the beginning, they mainly needed Indian clerks educated in English in order to strengthen their rule in India. English education also facilitated people of different provinces to come close to one another. Thus, it helped in raising, national feelings, and political con­sciousness among the Indians.

    4. Development of Means of Communication:

    The introduction of telegraphs and railways in 1852 and 1853 respectively gave India swift means of transport and communication. The modern means of communication shattered the age-old iso­lation of Indian villages and the people of remote part had the opportunity of coming closer to each other. They also promoted trade and commerce and helped people of different regions to develop social and intellectual intercourse.

    The new social and economic link removed their orthodox ways and made them conscious of their social disabilities. The introduction of uniform system of administration in India also brought a feeling of unity among Indians. Thus, the improvements in the means of transport and communication also quickened the pace of nationalist movement in the country.

    5. The Contribution of the Scholars:

    Several scholars and religious reformers played their role in furthering the cause of progress of the nationalist movement in the country. They emphasized the past glory and the rich heritage of India. The study and publication of the ancient Indian literature by the Asiatic Society of Bengal and the scholars such as Max Muller, Monier Williams, Colebrooke, Ranade, Hari Prasad Shastri, R.G. Bhandarkar, Rajendra Lai Mittra, etc., revealed to the people of India the splendor of the Sanskrit language and also inculcated among them a feeling of pride in their past and their faith in the future.

    6. The Contribution of the Social and Religious Reformers:

    Religious and social reformers, namely, Raja Rammohan Roy, Keshab Chandra Sen, Debendranath Tagore, Iswar Chandra Vidyasagar, Swami Dayanand Saraswati, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Vivekananda, and others had left a tremendous influence on the people of India; and they also were responsible for inspiring the countrymen to treasure the ideals of freedom and liberty.

    7. Influence of the Western Civilization:

    The establishment of British rule in India made closer relations with the Western world possible. Thus, the contacts with the European countries influenced the Indians immensely. The nineteenth century in Europe was the century of nationalism and liberalism.

    The Indians came to learn their lessons from the Europeans on both these ideologies. Indians imbibed the ideas of nationalism and liberalism from the Western countries, particularly from Germany, Italy, Greece, and Belgium. Besides this, the ideas of Western thinkers, namely, Macaulay, Burke, Bentham, Mill, Spencer, Rousseau, and Voltaire also inspired and encouraged the ideas of independence among the Indians. Thus, there was a growth of political consciousness and awakening among the Indians.

    8. Spread of English Language:

    There was a rapid spread of English education in India especially after the revolt of 1857. The second half of the nineteenth century was a golden age of Liberalism in Europe, particularly England. The study of the political classics of English literature from Milton to Mill planted in the minds of English educated Indians the seeds of liberalism in its two aspects—nationalism and democracy.

    Thus with the spread of English education, the educated Indians gradually became politically conscious. The British introduced the English lan­guage in India with their own selfish interest in mind. At the beginning, they mainly needed Indian clerks educated in English in order to strengthen their rule in India.

    English education also facilitated people of different provinces to come close to one another. Thus, it helped in raising, national feelings and political con­sciousness among the Indians. The social and religious reformers asked the people of India to look to their glorious past and try to bring back the same. They taught people to have faith in themselves.

    9. The Development of Indian Press and Literature:

    The Indian Press and literature both English and vernacular also used national conscious among the people of the country. Newspapers like the “Indian Mirror”, “Bombay Samachar” “The Hindu Patriot”, “The Amrit Bazar Patrika”, “The Hindu”, “The Kesari”, “The Bengalee”, etc., tremendously influenced the people of India and thus, left an indelible mark on the political life of the country. The writings of Din Bandhu Mitra, Hem Chandra Banerjee, Navin Chandra Sen, Bankim Chandra Chaterjee, R.C. Dutta and Rabindra Nath Tagore also affected the minds of the people. The “Anand Math” of Bankim Chandra Chaterjee has rightly been regarded as the “Bible” of modern Bengalee patriotism. Thus, the writings of the patriots and scholars brought about a revolution in the minds of the Indians. It is these revolutionary minds that were responsible for the growth of Indian nationalism.

    10. Economic Exploitation:

    The primary objective of the British rule in India was the economic exploitation. They took away raw materials from India and brought here their manufactured goods. The policy of economic exploitation ruined the Indian industries; and the British were taking away the wealth of India to their country.

    Their free trade policy proved ruinous for Indian trade and industries. Indian industries failed to compete with those of the British because the British had all the advantages and privileges on their side. Moreover, the British officials working in India had become a drain on the Indian resources.

    The economic system of India was molded to the needs of the people of England. Thus, the interests of the Indian people’ were completely ignored. No wonder the relations between the Indians and the Britishers became strained.

    11. Discrimination against Indians in the Appointment to Government Services:

    From the beginning, there was much discrimination shown in respect of appoint­ment of Indians to the government services. No Indian was given high positions. The British did not trust the Indians and their sincerity.

    The Proclamation of Queen Victoria in 1858 declared that Indians, henceforward, would be appointed to high posts on the basis of their merit irrespective of their caste, religion, or race. But this policy was not properly implemented.

    The policy of discrimination, arbitrary, and unjust policy of the Government created a great discontent and unrest among the educated people of India. They started taking active part in the national move­ment with the aim of driving away the British altogether from India.

    12. Racial Jealousies:

    During the mutiny, the relations of the Europeans and the Indians were greatly embittered. Many Britishers were killed in the Mutiny. So, the Britishers were full of vengeance. The helpless and the innocent Indians became the victims of their vengeance.

    The English killed their prisoners without trial and in a manner held by all Indians to be the height of barbarity. Some villages were marked out for destruction and all the men inhabiting there were slaughtered and indiscriminate burning of inhabitants occurred wherever the English armies moved.

    Such of atrocities aroused discontent and unrest among the people of India. Though the mutiny was suppressed for the time being, they were not able to suppress the feelings of nationalism among the people of India.

    Indians were prevented from travelling in the upper class railway compartment. Even the ruling chiefs were bullied into unlacing the boots shampooing the weary legs of the Sahibs just back from hunting expeditions. The administration of criminal justice was also scandalous.

    13. The Events of the Reign of Lord Lytton:

    The period from 1870 to 1884 was extremely tumultuous and was seen as the beginning time of Indian nationalism. The several acts of omission and commission in the time of Lord Lytton acceler­ated the nationalist movement. Lord Lytton held his famous Delhi Darbar in 1877 at a time when the people of South India were suffering from the effects of terrible famine.

    Most of the import duties on British textile imports were removed to please the textile manufacturers of England. Indians interpreted the action as proof of the British desire to ruin small but growing textile industry of India. In 1878, the Arms Act was passed, which disarmed the Indians. It appeared that it was an attempt by the government to weaken the whole nation.

    The second Afghan War cost the Indian treasury a lot. Lytton passed the Vernacular Press Act in 1878. The people belonging to all walks of life condemned the discriminatory provisions of the Act. It has been pointed out that the Act was a retrograde and ill-conceived measure injurious to the future progress of India.

    At the same time in 1878, the government announced new regulations reducing the maximum age limit for sitting in the Indian Civil Service Examination from 21 years to 19. All these measures created a widespread discontentment among the Indians. Anti-Indian administration of Lord Lytton helped to intensify discontent against foreign rule.

    14. Ilbert Bill Controversy:

    During the viceroyalty of Lord Rippon, a controversy arose concerning the Ilbert Bill. Rippon tried to pass a law to enable the Indian district magistrates and sessions judges to try the Europeans in criminal cases. The Europeans in India organized a vehement agitation against the bill, which was drafted by Ilbert, the law member of Rippons government.

    They poured abuses on Indians. Lord Rippon became the target of agitation. The Europeans declared that even the most highly educated among the Indians were unfit to try the Europeans. In the end, the government bowed before the Europeans. The Indians became conscious of the degradation to which foreign rule had reduced them. It increased racial bitterness, and led to the growth of national discontent.

  • Answer:

    Reduction of nitrobenzene in neutral medium using ammonium chloride solution and zinc dust gives phenyl hydroxylamine. These hydroxylamines when warmed with Tollen's regent are easily oxidised to the corresponding nitroso compounds and thus reduce Tollen's reagent to metallic silver.

  • Question: which organism causes Kala Azhar?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Leishmania parasite found in sand flies.

  • Answer:

    • glucocorticoids
    • cytostatics
    • antibodies
    • drugs acting on immunophilins

  • Question: which lymphocyte does the HIV virus attack?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

     HIV attacks and destroys the T helper lymphocytes, or T-cells, which are crucial to the immune system and immune response. 

  • Question: Which important product is associated with Raniganj?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Coalfield

  • Question: On which river is the Farakka Project located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Andhra Pradesh

  • Answer:

    Andhra Pradesh

  • Question: What is the function of the SAARC Secretariat?

    Posted in: History | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The SAARC seeks to promote the welfare of the peoples of South Asia, strengthen collective self-reliance, promote active collaboration and mutual assistance in various fields, and cooperate with international and regional organizations.

  • Answer:

    Gas exchange

    Gas                        % in inhaled air                  % in exhaled air

    Oxygen                            21                                  16

    Carbon dioxide                  0.04                                4

    Nitrogen                            79                                   79

  • Question: What is the location and function of Tympanum?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    In frogs and toads,tympanum is a large external oval shape membrane made up of nonglandular skin.[2] [3]it is located just behind the eye. It does not actually process sound waves; it simply transmits them to the amphibian's inner ear, which is protected from water and other foreign objects.

    A frog’s ear drum is called a Tympanum and works in very much the same way that our human ear drums work. A frog’s ear drum, just like a humans ear drum, is a membrane that is stretched across a ring of cartilage like a snare drum that vibrates. There is rod that is connected to the ear drum, which vibrates by sounds that come at the frog. That sound is just pressure waves. The rod sloshes around in the inner ear fluid, which causes microscopic hairs to move, which send signals to the frog’s brain for interception. A frog’s ear lungs also vibrate when sound waves come toward it, although they are less sensitive than the frogs ear drum.

  • Question: What the statistical study of human population is called?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Demography

  • Answer:

    Pia mater directly covers the brain and spinal cord. 

  • Answer:

    Use either soap and hot water (rinsing the germs away) or a disinfectant to kill the germs. 

  • Question: What is the difference between artery and vein?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    The chief difference between arteries and veins is the job that they do. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the body, and veins carry oxygen-poor blood back from the body to the heart. Your body also contains other, smaller blood vessels.

  • Question: In which cavity in the body the human lungs are located?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    The thoracic cavity contains the lungs and the heart.

  • Answer:

    calcium carbonate, silica, alumina and iron ore

  • Question: What is 'mini-steel plant'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    Mini steel plants are smaller, have electric furnaces, use steel scrap and sponge iron. They have re-rollers that use steel ingots as well. They produce mild and alloy steel of given specifications.

  • Question: What was the objective of the Indian National Army?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

     Its aim was to secure Indian independence from British rule. 

  • Question: What are the two types of Subordinate Court in States?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    Civil and criminal courts.

  • Question: What is the full form of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

  • Question: When and where was the first SAARC summit held?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    The first summit was held in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 7–8 December 1985

  • Question: What is original Jurisdiction of the High Court?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    The original jurisdiction of a court is the power to hear a case for the first time, as opposed to appellate jurisdiction, when a higher court has the power to review a lower court's decision.

  • Question: What is sulphonamides?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/01/2016

    Answer:

    Sulphonamides (sulfa drugs) are one of a group of drugs derived from sulphanilamide that prevents the growth of bacteria.

    Sulphonamides compete with p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) for the enzyme dihydropteroate synthetase, which is important in the formation of folic acid that is required by the bacteria. Folic acid is required for the synthesis of precursors of DNA and RNA both in bacteria and in mammals. Mammals obtain their folic acid in their diet but bacteria need to synthesize it. Sulphonamides inhibit the growth of bacteria but do not kill them i.e. their action is bacteriostatic.

    Many sulphonamides are rapidly excreted and very soluble in urine so they are used to treat infections of the urinary tract.

  • Answer:

    Bangalore

  • Question: What are the top medical colleges in India?

    Posted in: AICEE | Date: 23/01/2016

    Answer:

    All India Institute of Medical Sciences Delhi, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research CentreKochi, Armed Forces Medical College Pune, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute

  • Question: Who said "Swaraj is my birthright and I will have it."?

    Posted in: History | Date: 23/01/2016

    Answer:

    BALGANGADHAR TILAK

  • Question: where in India jute is cultivated widely?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 23/01/2016

    Answer:

    In India, jute is mainly grown in West Bengal,Bihar,Assam.

  • Question: In which State is Hirakud Project located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 23/01/2016

    Answer:

    Odisha

  • Answer:

    Bal Gangadhar Tilak was an outstanding leader of the Indian national movement scholar and thinker. In fact Tilak had been intimately associated with the Indian freedom struggle. From the period of 1870 to the beginning of 1920, Tilak's association with the Indian national movement could be divided into three phases. The first stage commenced from about 1879-80 AD, the second stage from 1891-97and the third stage from1905-08. Tilak's role in the Indian National Movement brought forward important developments. Though he began his fight on the Maratha soil yet his activities crossed the threshold Maharashtra.  The first stage in Tilak's role in the Indian National Movement extended over a period of 10 years. It was during these years that his radical political views and outlook was moulded. With the help of several colleagues, Tilak launched number educational undertakings in a private Secondary School that was independent of British official institutions, the Deccan Education Society and a college. At the same time in collaboration with some of the Maratha patriots, Tilak started two weekly newspapers the Mahratta and the Kesari. However during 1890s he had differences of opinion with his colleagues and as a result Tilak withdrew from the Deccan Education Society. Thus, the first stage is identified by Tilak combining broad educational work with political propaganda.  In the second stage of his career, the differences of opinion between Bal Gangadhar Tilak and the Maharashtra Moderate Nationalists widened. In the Sarvajanik Sabha, the difference was out in the open too. In 1895, Tilak succeeded in ousting the Moderates from the society and becoming its actual leader. He then moved forward to active political struggle against the colonial regime, to widely applying means and methods designed to enlist the masses into the struggle. In 1895 the Maharashtra Nationalists' radical wing came into being as a result of the breaking of the native political society in the then Deccan. Subsequently in 1897 with the aggravation of the political situation in Western India, culminated in Tilak's arrest and his being sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment.  This ushered in the third stage of Tilak's career. In the period of the 1905-08 revolutionary upsurge Tilak became the chief leader of the democrat tic wing of the national movement not only of Maharashtra but of the whole of India. Likewise covering ten years, 1898-1908, the third stage terminated in another trial of Tilak, his being sentenced to transportation, and a great revolutionary spurt of the masses of Mumbai who elevated the struggle for India's liberation to a new and higher plane.

  • Question: Why was the Civil Disobedience movement launched?

    Posted in: History | Date: 23/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Congress declared that if the government did not accept a constitution based on the dominion status within a year, it would adopt ‘Purana Swaraj’ as its goal.

     

    In 1929, having a meeting with Ramsay Macdonald, the Prime Minister of England, Lord Irwin returned to India and declared that the object of the British Government was to grant India dominion status. But the Prime Minister under pressure of the conservative leaders, failed to keep his promise. When Gandhiji met Lord Irwin in December 1929, the latter refused to make any commitment regarding dominion status.

    In utter despair Gandhiji said, ‘I have burnt my boat’. The country became prepared to fight for ‘Purana Swaraj’.

    According to Amales Tripathi, the main cause of the Civil Disobedience movement was worldwide economic depression during the period 1929-1930. Young leaders of the Congress became impatient for a movement. The revolutionaries were not sitting idle. The organizations of the works and the peasants gathered strength under organizations of the workers and the peasants gathered strength under the leadership of the communists. All these events led Gandhiji to feel the necessity of launching Civil Disobedience movement.

  • Question: What was the 'Jallianwala Bagh Tragedy'?

    Posted in: History | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    The Jallianwala Bagh massacre, also known as the Amritsar massacre, was an event which took place on 13 April 1919 when a crowd of nonviolent protesters, along with Baishakhi pilgrims, who had gathered in Jallianwala Bagh, Amritsar, Punjab were fired upon by troops of the British Indian Army under the command of Colonel Reginald Dyer. The civilians had assembled to participate in the annual Baisakhi celebrations—both a religious and cultural festival for the Punjabis.

  • Question: Which organ produces urea?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Urea is produced in the liver and is a metabolite (breakdown product) of amino acids.

  • Question: What is the difference between blood plasma and serum?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Serum is that part of blood which is similar in composition with plasmabut exclude clotting factors of blood. Fibrinogen is a protein that is involved in blood coagulation.

  • Question: Why is the land of Bangladesh fertile?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Land of Bangladesh is fertile because of alluvial plain formed by Ganga & Brahmaputra rivers which flow through it.

  • Question: Why in Bhutan, there are no extensive valleys?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    There are no extensive valleys because the Himalayan ranges in this region lie very close to each other.

  • Question: Which part of the ovary produces progesterone?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

     corpus luteum

  • Question: Why does Nepal have limited cultivable land?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Nepal has limited cultivable land because of its extremely cold climate, infertile soil & hardly any rainfall. The land is not navigable because of its high mountains.

  • Answer:

    Agriculture and fishing

  • Question: What is meant by 'Home Rule'?

    Posted in: History | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Home rule is the power of a constituent part (administrative division) of a state to exercise such of the state's powers of governance within its own administrative area that have been decentralized to it by the central government.

  • Answer:

    The Himalayas by virtue of their high altitude, direction & length play a very significant role in the climate of South Asia.

  • Answer:

    North-Western Himalayas & Trans-Himalayan region

  • Question: Which states of India touch the borders of Nepal?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Sikkim, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Bihar & Uttaranchal.

  • Question: why in Bhutan the rivers flow from North to South?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    The rivers flow from north to south because of elevation or the topography of the land. In the north, there are the great Himalayas but in the south the land is flat.

  • Answer:

    WCP lies along the Arabian Sea, is narrow & has lagoons, while ECP lies along the Bay of Bengal, is wider & more level. WCP is known as Maharashtra, Kanara coast in Karnataka, Malabar coast in Kerala; while known as northern Circars in North and Coromandel coast in South. WCP has estuaries and is uneven; ECP has fertile deltas of rivers.

  • Answer:

    The organ of Corti, or spiral organ, is the receptor organ for hearing and is located in the mammalian cochlea. Described as "a masterpiece of cellular micro-architecture", this highly varied strip of epithelial cells allows for transduction of auditory signals into nerve impulses' action potential.Transduction occurs through vibrations of structures in the inner ear causing displacement of cochlear fluid and movement of hair cells at the organ of Corti to produce electrochemical signals

  • Question: What was the Rowlatt Act, 1919?

    Posted in: History | Date: 06/02/2016

    Answer:

    Rowlatt Acts, (February 1919), legislation passed by the Imperial Legislative Council, the legislature of British India. The acts allowed certain political cases to be tried without juries and permitted internment of suspects without trial.

  • Answer:

     In simple terms, the umbilical cord is a growing fetus's lifeline. It is a flexible, tube-like structure that connects a fetus to the mother's placenta, an organ attached to the uterine wall that, in turn, connects to the mother's blood supply.

    The umbilical cord carries oxygenated blood and nutrients from the placenta to the fetus through the abdomen, where the navel forms. It also carries deoxygenated blood and waste products from the fetus to the placenta. When the baby is born, the umbilical cord is cut close to the baby's body, and the stump falls off on its own. 

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