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MPT 52352
  • Male, 28 Years
  • Activity Score2868

Debarun S

Never Compromising with Quality
  • Qualification:
    B.Tech
  • Experience:
    I have been teaching Mathematics, Physics, Computer, Science to the students of class I - V of all boards and Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science to the students of class VII - X of all boards since last four years. ... More [+]
  • Teaches:
    Science, Physics, Mathematics, Computer, Computer Science, Chemistry, School level computer, SSC Exams, Insurance Exams, IBPS, Defence Exams
  • Board:
    All Boards
  • Areas:
  • Pincode:
    700109
Profile Details
Profile Details

Qualification :

B.Tech

Total Experience :

4 Years

I have been teaching Mathematics, Physics, Computer, Science to the students of class I - V of all boards and Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science to the students of class VII - X of all boards since last four years. My teaching style is unique it is beneficial for boards as well as competitive examination like SSC exams, Defence / NDA, Insurance Exams (LIC & GIC), IBPS.

Tutoring Option:

I Can Manage Both

Tutoring Approach:

As an ex student of R K Mission Narendrapur and ex employee of IBM I know what are the moral values and what a child with particular mindset desires. So along with developing them common practices like audio visual approach, slideshow, notes and periodical assessment will be there.

Hourly Fees [INR]:

300.00

Tuition Schedule:

  • Sunday : --
  • Monday : --
  • Tuesday : --
  • Wednesday : --
  • Thursday : --
  • Friday : --
  • Saturday : --
Class 1 - 5 Mathematics, Computer, Science, Science, All Boards INR 300.00 /hour
Class 9 - 10 Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, School level computer, All Boards INR 300.00 /hour
Class 6 - 8 Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science, All Boards INR 300.00 /hour
Competitive Exams SSC Exams, Defence Exams, Insurance Exams, IBPS INR 300.00 /hour
Educational Resources
Educational Resources

Notes written by me [44]

BARRONS GRE IMPORTANT WORDs
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BARRON's GRE Important Word Collected in a SINGLE PDF file

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NETWORKING - Unix Socket Programming - Part 3
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This document provides information about Unix Socket Programming - Part 3 in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Unix Socket Programming - Part 2
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This document provides information about Unix Socket Programming - Part 2  in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Unix Socket Programming
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This document provides information about Unix Socket Programming in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Transport Layer Protocol- Implem...
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This document provides information about Transport Layer Protocol- Implementation Issues in Networking.

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NETWORKING - TCP - Part2
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This document provides information about more fetaures in Transport Layer Protocol in Networking.

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NETWORKING - TCP
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This document provides information about Transport Layer Protocol in Networking.

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NETWORKING - ARP, RARP, ICMP Protocols
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This document provides information about ARP,RARP,ICMP Protocols in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Routing Algorithms
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This document provides information about Routing Algorithms in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Layers
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This document provides information about Network layers and Routing.

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NETWORKING - Data Link Layer
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This document provides information about Data Link Layer in Networking.

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NETWORKING - IEEE 802.5 Token Ring - 2nd Part
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This document provides information about 2nd part of Token Ring Network and its fetaures.

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NETWORKING - IEEE 802.5 Token Ring
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This document provides information about IEEE 802.5: Token Ring Network and its operations.

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Networking - Ieee 802.3 Ethernet
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This document provides information about IEEE 802.3 and Ethernet in Networking.

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NETWORKING - CSMA/CA
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This document provides information about CSMA with Collision Avoidance in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Multiplexing & Network Topologie...
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This document provides information about Multiplexing and Network Topologies.

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NETWORKING - Data Encoding
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This document provides information about Data Encoding in Networking.

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NETWORKING - Layers
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This document provides information about various layers like Session Layer, Presentation Layer, Application Layer etc.

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Networking - Layered Architecture
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This document introduces the ISO-OSI layered architecture of Networks.

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RDBMS CONCEPT - SQL Syntax
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This document provides information about SQL Statements and Various Syntax in SQL

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RDBMS Concepts
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This document provides information about RDBMS IMPORTANT CONCEPT

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ORACLE PLSQL - Cursors
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This document discuss about the cursors in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Functions
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This document discuss about functions in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL- Procedures
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This document discuss about Procedures in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Arrays
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This document discuss about Arrays in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Strings
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This document discuss about strings in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Loops
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This document discuss about various Loops in PL/SQL like FOR LOOP, WHile LOOP.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Conditions
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This document provides information about various conditions in PL/SQL

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ORACLE PLSQL - Various Operators
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This document discusses about various operators in PL/SQL

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ORACLE PLSQL - Constants And Literals
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This document discuss constants and literals in PL/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Variables
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This document discuss Variables in Pl/SQL.

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ORACLE PLSQL - Data Types
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This document discuss the Data Types, variables, constants  in PL/SQL

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ORACLE PLSQL - PL SQL - Basic Syntax
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This document provides information about Basic Syntax of PL/SQL, Identifiers and  Delimeters.

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ORACLE PLSQL - PL/SQL - Setup
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This document provides the Environment Setup of PL/SQL.

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Oracle PLSQL - Introduction
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The document contains Information about PLSQL Tutorials

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ORACLE SQL - Tutorial 1
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The documents contains information about various  functions and features of Oracle. 

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ORACLE SQL
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ORACLE SQL

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ORACLE SQL - Tutorial 2
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More Built Function about ORACLE SQL

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ORACLE SQL - Tutorial 3
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This Tutorial describes more information about ORACLE SQL.

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ORACLE SQL Tutorial For Beginners Step By Ste...
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ORACLE SQL beginner's complete step by step guide FOR B.Tech CSE AND IT students.

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ORACLE SQL Tutorial For Beginners Step By Ste...
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ORACLE SQL beginner's complete step by step guide FOR B.Tech CSE AND IT students.

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ORACLE SQL Tutorial For Beginners Step By Ste...
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ORACLE SQL beginner's complete step by step guide FOR B.Tech CSE AND IT students.

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Height And Distance
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this study note will help you to understand about height and distance and their application in trigonometry. this notes has also some important problem based on solved examples

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Acid, Base And Salt
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It is a gist about the chapter acid-base and salt which is just to be looked on before eam.

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Presentations prepared by me [59]

Basic Electricity
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This presentation reflects some important and basic facts based on electricity

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Defining Atom
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As we proceed towards very basic physics and chemistry atom plays the most important role there. so it is very necessary to have clear conception of atom, Dalton\'s atomic theory and the sub particle residing inside atom. this presentation tries to illu...

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Concept Of Density
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This presentation clearly describes density from scratch. what is density, how densities of solid, liquid and gases depend etc. it also shows density chart of different element

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Determining Wave Frequency From A Graph
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This presentation describes what wave frequencies are and how to derive wave frequency from a graph

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Direction Of Acceleration Due To Gravity
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This slide explains what will be the direction of acceleration due to gravity of several objects.

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Electric Motor
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This slideshow nicely illustrates how an electric motor works. useful for class x students

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Prime Number
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This presentation helps students to have very good idea about prime numbers and how to come to the conclusion whether a number is prime or not.

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Projectile Motion
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This presentation clearly describes about projectile motion i.e object thrown at an angle, horizontally, verti cally, maximum height attained everything. hope it will help you

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Radioactive Decay
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This presentation clearly describes all the three type of decay viz alpha decay, beta decay and gamma decay

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SI Unit
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This presentation describes all the basic SI Unit and helps to understand what a homogenous equations are

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Circle Theorem
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Basic and important theorem based on circle. useful for secondary level students of mathematics

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Slope And Y Intercept
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This clearly describes the basic mathematical funda about what is slope and how it is calculated

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Balanced Forces
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This is to understand balanced forces and principal of moment calculation

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Writing Linear Equation
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This is about how to write linear equation in the form of y=mx+c

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Wave
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This a very good slide to understand wave and their various properties and also mathematical relations among this properties

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Spherical Mirrors
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This slide show illustrates about two type of spherical mirror e.g concave and convex mirrors and all the terms related to these mirrors.

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Volume Of A Cylinder
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This will help student to understand what volume is and how volume of a cylinder is calculated. rules of Unit conversion is also described.

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Tangents Of Circle
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This presentation will help student to understand what tangent is and how they are constructed.

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Noble Gas Family
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This presentation illustrates about group 18 in the periodic table, i.e the noble gas family

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Logarithmic Function
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This presentation gives the idea about logarithmic functions. useful for better grip in maths

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Light
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this presentation is about what light is , how human eye acts as a camera,concave and convex lenses, refraction of light etc. useful for class viii students

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Household Electricity
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This presentation briefly describes how the connections in household electricity is made and all the related fundamentals of household electricity

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GROUP 16
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This presentation describes group 16. the oxygen group of periodic table and the basic property. 

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Friction
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very basic fundamental aspect of friction. useful for class VII or VIII

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Element, Compound And Mixture
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as we know element, compound and mixtures are the three basic constituents of modern chemistry, hereby i am uploading a presentation which will briefly describe these things along with their property

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ELECTRICAL CIRCUT
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this is very basic presentation of electric circuit. useful for class VII science student

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Boyle's Law
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this is the presentation about Boyle's law. This presentation clearly answer all the basic question about boyle's Law

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Bond And Energy
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this presentation depicts how bond is related to energy. what exothermic and endo thermic reaction is

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Atoms And Periodic Table
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this presentation briefly describes how atom is varied along a periodic table. very basic presentation. helpful for CBSE class X students

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Magnetism
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This presentation describes basic magnetism theory as well as how magnetism is related to electricity and vice versa

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Square And Square Root
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This is a presentation for class v students which describes what square and what square root is

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Types Of Triangle
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This is a presentation for very basic level math students eg v or vi. This ellaborates what different types of triangle is

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Volume And Surface Area
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This is a presentation which depicts volume and surface areas of different three dimensional figures like cube, cuboid, sphere, cylinder, hemisphere etc.

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Sine And Cosine Rule
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This is a mathematical presentation which enables you to determine the sides and angles of a particular triangle when the triangle itself is not a right angled triangle.

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Perimeter And Area
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This is about what perimeter and area is and some common formulas for some 2D figures. Important for class vii students of CBSE board

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Pythagora's Theorem
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This is what the theorem is and how Pythagora\'s theorem is proved. Very much important keeping mathematical aspect in mind

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Mean Median And Mode
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This is statistics part of mathematics for class ix and x students. This presentation gives brief idea how to calculate mean, median and mode

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Area
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This is theoritical approach to how area is determined using calculus integration

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Newton's Laws
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This is about all the three laws of Newton and differnet terms reated to these three laws

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Motion
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This presentation shows what is motion and what are different types of motion. Very basic physics

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Transportation In Animals
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This presentation briefly describes how transportation of animal is done through blood and role of blood in transportation

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Congruency Of Triangle
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This presentation illustrates various congruency rules in triangles. Useful for class vii to x

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Volume And Surface Areas
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this presentation describes volume and surface areas of different objects like cone, cylinder, cube etc

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Quadratic Equation
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quadratic equation and various ways to solve them

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Models And Some Application Of Trigonometry
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this presentation will briefly describe about applications of trigomery. useful for class x cbse students

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Trigonometric Functions
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basic description to main three trigonometric functions

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T Ratios
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this ppt will briefly describe about main three function of trigonometric ratios. useful for class 10

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Co Ordinate Geometry
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this silde depicts how to calculate the distance between two points and the formula to determine the co ordinate of mid point

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Cartesian Plane And Gradient
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this presentation will provide you with the idea of cartesuan plane and gradient in co ordinate geometry

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Angles And Triangles
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a very basic idea about angles and triangles, for class v and vi

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Matter And Its Properties
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brief presentation on matter around us and its properties

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Newton's Laws Of Motion
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journey through all the three laws provided by Sir Isaac Newton

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Periodic Table
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Basic idea about periodic table

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Electrical Circuit And Basics Of Electricity
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Electrical circuit and basics of electricity

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Reflection Of Light
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This presentation briefly gives idea about reflection of light. Useful for class viii and class x cbse students

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Quadratic Equation
1 time downloaded

This presentation will help you to understand how you can solve a quadratic equation using factorising method

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Refraction Of Light
1 time downloaded

This slides will help you to understand about the basic things which occur in case of refraction of light

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Newton's Laws Of Motion
8 times downloaded

This presentation reflects the idea about all the three laws of motion

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Acid, Base And Salt
17 times downloaded

A thorough ptesentation of acid base and salt . helpful for class 10

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Answer
Answer
  • Answer:

    askiitians.com 0 Get instant 50% OFF on Online Material. Use coupon code: MOB50 | View Course list Home » Forum » Organic Chemistry » coordination-compounds mercy yadav Write the difference between double salt and complex compound. ? 2 years ago Share See our forum point policy Answers : (2) Vidyasagar Mohanraj 35 Points Double salts are molecular compounds which are formed by the evoporation of solution containing 2 or more salts in stoichiometric proportions.They dissociate into their constituent ions in solution eg: K2SO4.Al2(SO4)3.24H2O --> 2K^+ + 2Al^3+ + 4SO4^2- + 24H2O this is how it dissociates A complex compound is a compound formed from a lewis acid and a lewis base.They don''t dissociate into its constituent ions in solutions eg: Fe(CN)2 + 4KCN ---> K4[Fe(CN)6] K4[Fe(CN)6] on dissociation gives 4K^+ + [Fe(CN)6]^4- In K4[Fe(CN)6] the individual components lose their identity.The metal of the complex ion is not free in solution unlike the metal in double salt solution

  • Answer:

    Complex ions are ions with a central metal ion bonded to one or more molecules or ions. Examples: The copper ammine ion, Cu(NH3)62+ is a complex ion.

  • Question: What is polyhedra ?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    Polyhedra is a family of standards-based relational database systems designed for use in embedded systems,

  • Answer:

    Chelation describes a particular way that ions and molecules bind metal ions.[1] According to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), chelation involves the formation or presence of two or more separate coordinate bonds between a polydentate (multiple bonded) ligand and a single central atom.[2] Usually these ligands are organic compounds, and are called chelants, chelators, chelating agents, or sequestering agents. Chelation is useful in applications such as providing nutritional supplements, in chelation therapy to remove toxic metals from the body, as contrast agents in MRI scanning, in manufacturing using homogeneous catalysts, and in fertilizers.

  • Question: Can you tell me what are transuranium elements ?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    The transuranium elements (also known as transuranic elements) are the chemical elements with atomic numbers greater than 92 (the atomic number of uranium). All of these elements are unstable and decay radioactively into other elements.

  • Answer:

    Aqua regia (Latin, lit. "royal water"), aqua regis (Latin, lit. "king's water"), or nitro-hydrochloric acid is a highly corrosive mixture of acids, a fuming yellow or red solution. The mixture is formed by freshly mixing concentrated nitric acid and hydrochloric acid,[1] optimally in a volume ratio of 1:3. Aqua Regia was named so because it can dissolve the noble metals gold and platinum. However, titanium, iridium, ruthenium, rhenium, tantalum, niobium, hafnium, osmium, rhodium and tungsten are capable of withstanding its corrosive properties.[2] Applications Edit Aqua regia is primarily used to produce chloroauric acid, the electrolyte in the Wohlwill process. This process is used for refining the highest quality (99.999%) gold. Aqua regia is also used in etching and in specific analytic procedures. It is also used in some laboratories to clean glassware of organic compounds and metal particles. This method is preferred over the "traditional" chromic acid bath for cleaning NMR tubes, because no traces of paramagnetic chromium can remain to spoil spectra.[3] While chromic acid baths are discouraged because of the high toxicity of chromium and the potential for explosions, aqua regia is itself very corrosive and has been implicated in several explosions due to mishandling.[4] Due to the reaction between its components resulting in its decomposition, aqua regia quickly loses its effectiveness (yet remains a strong acid), so its components are usually only mixed immediately before use. While local regulations may vary, aqua regia may be disposed of by careful neutralization, before being poured down the sink. If there is contamination by dissolved metals, the neutralized solution should be collected for disposal.[5][6]

  • Question: What is potential difference?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    Potential difference between two points in a circuit is the work done in moving unit charge (i.e. one coulomb) from one point to the other. The units for potential difference are Joules per coulomb, or volts. (1 volt = 1 Joule/coulomb).

  • Answer:

    plane mirrors produce images with a number of distinguishable characteristics. Images formed by plane mirrors are virtual, upright, left-right reversed, the same distance from the mirror as the object's distance, and the same size as the object.

  • Question: What is a lunar eclipse?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow). This can occur only when the sun, Earth and moon are aligned (in "syzygy") exactly, or very closely so, with the Earth in the middle. Hence, a lunar eclipse can occur only the night of a full moon.

  • Answer:

    total eclipse occurs when the dark silhouette of the Moon completely obscures the intensely bright light of the Sun, allowing the much fainter solar corona to be visible. During any one eclipse, totality occurs at best only in a narrow track on the surface of Earth.[5] An annular eclipse occurs when the Sun and Moon are exactly in line, but the apparent size of the Moon is smaller than that of the Sun. Hence the Sun appears as a very bright ring, or annulus, surrounding the dark disk of the Moon.[6] A hybrid eclipse (also called annular/total eclipse) shifts between a total and annular eclipse. At certain points on the surface of Earth it appears as a total eclipse, whereas at other points it appears as annular. Hybrid eclipses are comparatively rare.[6] A partial eclipse occurs when the Sun and Moon are not exactly in line and the Moon only partially obscures the Sun. This phenomenon can usually be seen from a large part of the Earth outside of the track of an annular or total eclipse. However, some eclipses can only be seen as a partial eclipse, because the umbra passes above the Earth's polar regions and never intersects the Earth's surface.[6] Partial eclipses are virtually unnoticeable, as it takes well over 90% coverage to notice any darkening at all. Even at 99% it would be no darker than civil twilight.

  • Answer:

    Birds flying high in the sky do cast their shadow but because they are shading an area that is very tiny, the shadow is not visible. The higher the bird flies, the smaller the shadow it casts.

  • Question: How is a shadow formed?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    shadow is made when an object blocks light. The object must be opaque or translucent to make a shadow. A transparent object will not make any shadow, as light will pass straight through it.

  • Answer:

    The characteristics of an image produced by a pinhole camera The image produced by a pinhole camera is usually smaller than the object and appears to be inverted on both the vertical and horizontal axis when compared to the actual object. The image itself can be called "real" because it is visible on the screen. Characteristics of the image: generally smaller than the object vertical inversion (upside-down) horizontal inversion (symmetric) real The behaviour of light The rays coming from the object which pass through the pinhole must converge in order to cross at the level of the hole. Then, once inside the pinhole, the rays diverge. The vertical and horizontal inversions of the image when compared to the object can thus be explained by simple geometric logic. The analysis of the image produced by a pinhole camera demonstrates the rectilinear propagation of light.

  • Question: What is bioluminesence? How does it occur?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    What Is Bioluminescence? Bioluminescence is defined as the emission of light from a living organism that functions for its survival or propagation. It is a "cold" light, resulting from a specific biochemical mechanism involving chemical processes, often specific for that organism. Bioluminescent organisms occur mostly in the marine environment, and bioluminescence is one of the major communication mechanisms in the deep sea (1). Although less common terrestrially, observations are naturally more frequent there. Bioluminescence can be thought of as a chemiluminescence that is catalyzed by an enzyme. This light emission from an organism needs to be distinguished from other forms of luminescence, many also having biological function, fluorescence, iridescence, diffraction etc. How Does Bioluminescence Work? All bioluminescence reactions involve an oxygen oxidation of an organic molecule (called the luciferin). The reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme called a luciferase and in many cases, the bioluminescence intensity is assumed to reflect the velocity of the enzyme-substrate reaction, and this intensity is used to analyze the kinetics on the Michaelis-Menten model (Figure 5A). It was first a puzzle that the bioluminescence of aequorin and subsequently of several other like organisms, was found not to involve oxygen kinetically, and these proteins were labeled "photoproteins" (Figure 5B). It was eventually established that the oxygen had already bound to the luciferin, and the photoprotein therefore could be more accurately thought of as a luciferase binding a stabilized reaction intermediate, a peroxy-luciferin. Many bioluminescent reactions in vitro require cofactors in addition to oxygen, e.g., ATP and Mg2+ for the firefly, Ca2+ for photoproteins (1, 2, 4). In the animal itself (in vivo), there are additional proteins involved for production and regulation, some called "accessory proteins", examples being the fatty acid reductase group of enzymes that produce the bacterial luciferin, a long-chain aldehyde, and there are luciferin-binding proteins in the dinoflagellate and Sea Pansy bioluminescence systems. Also, there are "antenna proteins" that act to modulate the color of bioluminescence, the famous Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) in the jellyfish, and the Lumazine Protein family in some types of bacteria (4). These are named "antenna proteins" by analogy to proteins of similar function in photosynthesis, except that they act in a reverse sense.

  • Question: Why does copper cannot replace hydrogen from acids ?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    it has to do with the activity series. Hydrogen is more active than copper, so copper can't replace hydrogen. Hydrogen will replace copper, though.

  • Answer:

    In the reaction chambers, nitric oxide reacts with oxygen to produce nitrogen dioxide. Liquid from the bottom of the chambers is diluted and pumped to the top of the chamber and sprayed downwards in a fine mist. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are absorbed in the liquid and react to form sulfuric acid and nitric oxide. The liberated nitric oxide is sparingly soluble in water and returns to the gas in the chamber where it reacts with oxygen in the air to reform nitrogen dioxide. Some percentage of the nitrogen oxides are sequestered in the reaction liquor as nitrosylsulfuric acid and as nitric acid, so fresh nitric oxide must be added as the process proceeds. Later versions of chamber plants included a high temperature Glover tower to recover the nitrogen oxides from the chamber liquor, while concentrating the chamber acid to as much as 78% H2SO4. Exhaust gases from the chambers are scrubbed by passing into a tower through which some of the Glover acid flows over broken tile. Nitrogen oxides are absorbed to form nitrosylsulfuric acid which is then returned to the Glover tower to reclaim the oxides of nitrogen. Sulfuric acid produced in the reaction chambers is limited to about 35% concentration. At higher concentrations, nitrosylsulfuric acid precipitates on the lead walls as chamber crystals and is no longer able to catalyze the oxidation reactions.[2]

  • Answer:

    Bleach is an amazing, multi-purpose substance that is very useful in homes, hospitals, science laboratories and industry. It's a potent germ killer and can also whiten and brighten fabrics, remove stains and clean surfaces. Some people even use bleach in their art projects. There are several chemicals that can act as bleaches. The most common is sodium hypochlorite, or NaClO. Sodium hypochlorite dissolved in water is sometimes known as chlorine bleach. It destroys a wide range of bacteria, algae, fungi and viruses. Other hypochlorites can also act as bleaches, including calcium hypochlorite. This is sold as "bleaching powder". Some chemicals that don't belong to the hypochlorite family are bleaches too, such as hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate. This article is concerned with sodium hypochlorite bleach, however, which is easily obtainable and widely used. Sodium hypochlorite reacts with proteins in microbes, denaturing them, or changing their shape. A protein is made of one or more long chains of amino acids. Each chain is twisted and folded into a specific shape. If the shape changes, the protein can no longer do its job. The hypochlorous acid that forms when sodium hypochlorite reacts with water causes microbe proteins to denature and then clump together, forming a non-functional mass. This kills the microbes.

  • Question: Which types of protocols can be used in URL?

    Posted in: Computer Science | Date: 06/10/2015

    Answer:

    http

  • Question: How can we curb noise pollution?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 21/10/2015

    Answer:

    Below are a few things people and governments can do to make our communities and living laces quieter: noise and nuisanceConstruction of soundproof rooms for noisy machines in industrial and manufacturing installations must be encouraged. This is also important for residential building—noisy machines should be installed far from sleeping and living rooms, like in a basement or garage. noise and nuisanceUse of horns with jarring sounds, motorbikes with damaged exhaust pipes, noisy trucks to be banned. noise and nuisanceNoise producing industries, airports, bus and transport terminals and railway stations to sighted far from where living places. noise and nuisanceCommunity law enforcers should check the misuse of loudspeakers, worshipers, outdoor parties and discos, as well as public announcements systems. noise and nuisanceCommunity laws must silence zones near schools / colleges, hospitals etc. noise and nuisanceVegetation (trees) along roads and in residential areas is a good way to reduce noise pollution as they absorb sou

  • Answer:

    Matter can be broken down into two categories: pure substances and mixtures. Pure substances are further broken down into elements and compounds. Mixtures are physically combined structures that can be separated into their original components.

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    A centrifuge is a piece of equipment that puts an object in rotation around a fixed axis (spins it in a circle), applying a potentially strong force perpendicular to the axis of spin (outward). The centrifuge works using the sedimentation principle, where the centripetal acceleration causes denser substances and particles to move outward in the radial direction. At the same time, objects that are less dense are displaced and move to the center. In a laboratory centrifuge that uses sample tubes, the radial acceleration causes denser particles to settle to the bottom of the tube, while low-density substances rise to the top.[1] There are 3 types of centrifuge designed for different applications. Industrial scale centrifuges are commonly used in manufacturing and waste processing to sediment suspended solids, or to separate immiscible liquids. An example is the cream separator found in dairies. Very high speed centrifuges and ultracentrifuges able to provide very high accelerations can separate fine particles down to the nano-scale, and molecules of different masses.

  • Answer:

    Lactometer, a cylindrical vessel made by blowing a glass tube. One side of glass tube looks like a bulb with filled by mercury and another site is thin tube with scaled. For milk testing lactometer dipped in milk which we are testing. In lactometer the point up to which it sinks in the pure milk is marked after that put in water and marked at the point up to which it sinks in water. It sinks less in milk then water because as we know milk is denser then water. There are to portions i.e. 'M 'and 'W' which is divided in three parts and marked as 3, 2 and 1. That indicates the level of the purity. Here below some steps mentioned for testing - # Step 1- Whenever you want to test the milk purity, you just put the instrument in milk.# Step 2- If it sinks up to the mark 'M' which mentioned at instrument that means milk is pure or if not that means it is impure.# Step 3- If the milk is mixed in water then it would sink higher then marked 'M'.# Step4- If it stands at the mark 3 that means milk is 75% pure and respectively 2 for 50% purity and 1 means 25% purity. Lactometer is basically more suitable or useful in sea warfare where now the days most of shops and submarines also use it for milk purity test. Here below advantages of lactometer mentioned by which you have an idea about how it gives you advantage- Advantages of Lactometer Everyone can use lactometers easily. Results have maximum accuracy. Requires low maintenance cost. Price are minimum that's why anyone can purchase it. Lactometers are used for milk purity checker and also a very reliable instrument. It is scientifically observed that the cases of skimmed milk the lactometer fails to provide correct results if the density of skimmed milk is made equal to pure milk adding water. Conclusion- Lactometer is useful for milk testing by which anyone can measure their purity easily. It's necessary to eat or drink healthy for a healthy life.

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    Properties of Minerals The following physical properties of minerals can be easily used to identify a mineral: Color Streak Hardness Cleavage or Fracture Crystalline Structure Diaphaneity or Amount of Transparency Tenacity Magnetism Luster Odor Taste Specific Gravity Below is a detailed description of each of these properties of minerals. Properties of Minerals- A Detailed Description Color Most minerals have a distinctive color that can be used for identification. In opaque minerals, the color tends to be more consistent, so learning the colors associated with these minerals can be very helpful in identification. Translucent to transparent minerals have a much more varied degree of color due to the presence of trace minerals. Therefore, color alone is not reliable as a single identifying characteristic. Streak Streak is the color of the mineral in powdered form. Streak shows the true color of the mineral. In large solid form, trace minerals can change the color appearance of a mineral by reflecting the light in a certain way. Trace minerals have little influence on the reflection of the small powdery particles of the streak. The streak of metallic minerals tends to appear dark because the small particles of the streak absorb the light hitting them. Non-metallic particles tend to reflect most of the light so they appear lighter in color or almost white. Because streak is a more accurate illustration of the mineral’s color, streak is a more reliable property of minerals than color for identification. Hardness Hardness is one of the better properties of minerals to use for identifying a mineral. Hardness is a measure of the mineral’s resistance to scratching. The Mohs scale is a set of 10 minerals whose hardness is known. The softest mineral, talc, has a Mohs scale rating of one. Diamond is the hardest mineral and has a rating of ten. Softer minerals can be scratched by harder minerals because the forces that hold the crystals together are weaker and can be broken by the harder mineral. The following is a listing of the minerals of the Mohs scale and their rating: Talc Gypsum Calcite Fluorite Apatite Orthoclase Feldspar Quartz Topaz Corundum Diamond Cleavage & Fracture Minerals tend to break along lines or smooth surfaces when hit sharply. Different minerals break in different ways showing different types of cleavage. Cleavage is defined using two sets of criteria. The first set of criteria describes how easily the cleavage is obtained. Cleavage is considered perfect if it is easily obtained and the cleavage planes are easily distinguished. It is considered good if the cleavage is produced with some difficulty but has obvious cleavage planes. Finally it is considered imperfect if cleavage is obtained with difficulty and some of the planes are difficult to distinguish. The second set of criteria is the direction of the cleavage surfaces. The names correspond to the shape formed by the cleavage surfaces: Cubic, rhombohedral, octahedral, dodecahedral, basal or prismatic. These criteria are defined specifically by the angles of the cleavage lines as indicated in the chart below: Cleavage Type Angles Cubic Cleaves in three directions @ 90o to one anotherRhombohedral Cleaves in three directions but not @ 90o to one anotherOctahedral Cleaves in four directionsDodecahedral Cleaves in six directionsBasal Cleaves in one directionPrismatic Cleaves in two directions Fracture describes the quality of the cleavage surface. Most minerals display either uneven or grainy fracture, conchoidal (curved, shell-like lines) fracture, or hackly (rough, jagged) fracture. Crystalline Structure Mineral crystals occur in various shapes and sizes. The particular shape is determined by the arrangement of the atoms, molecules or ions that make up the crystal and how they are joined. This is called the crystal lattice. There are degrees of crystalline structure, in which the fibers of the crystal become increasingly difficult or impossible to see with the naked eye or the use of a hand lens. Microcrystalline and cryptocrystalline structures can only be viewed using high magnification. If there is no crystalline structure, it is called amorphous. However, there are very few amorphous crystals and these are only observed under extremely high magnification. Transparency or Diaphaneity Diaphaneity is a mineral’s degree of transparency or ability to allow light to pass through it. The degree of transparency may also depend on the thickness of the mineral. Tenacity Tenacity is the characteristic that describes how the particles of a mineral hold together or resist separation. The chart below gives the list of terms used to describe tenacity and a description of each term. Magnetism Magnetism is the characteristic that allows a mineral to attract or repel other magnetic materials. It can be difficult to determine the differences between the various types of magnetism, but it is worth knowing that there are distinctions made. Luster Luster is the property of minerals that indicates how much the surface of a mineral reflects light. The luster of a mineral is affected by the brilliance of the light used to observe the mineral surface. Luster of a mineral is described in the following terms: Metallic The mineral is opaque and reflects light as a metal would.Submettalic The mineral is opaque and dull. The mineral is dark colored.Nonmettalic The mineral does not reflect light like a metal. Nonmetallic minerals are described using modifiers that refer to commonly known qualities. Waxy The mineral looks like paraffin or wax.Vitreous The mineral looks like broken glass.Pearly The mineral appears iridescent, like a pearl.Silky The mineral looks fibrous, like silk.Greasy The mineral looks like oil on water.Resinous The mineral looks like hardened tree sap (resin).Adamantine The mineral looks brilliant, like a diamond. Odor Most minerals have no odor unless they are acted upon in one of the following ways: moistened, heated, breathed upon, or rubbed. Taste Only soluble minerals have a taste, but it is very important that minerals not be placed in the mouth or on the tongue. You should not test for this property in the classroom. Specific Gravity Specific Gravity of a mineral is a comparison or ratio of the weight of the mineral to the weight of an equal amount of water. The weight of the equal amount of water is found by finding the difference between the weight of the mineral in air and the weight of the mineral in water. Knowing the properties of minerals will help you to identify minerals in the field.

  • Question: What are incombustible substances? Give four examples.

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 21/10/2015

    Answer:

    neon is the only one i have got so far...........i'm searching for more Any material that does not readily burn. For everyday use, most metals, rock, and glass are non-combustible. Drywall (Sheetrock is a brand name) is made from gypsum rock, and is considered non-combustible- as is brick and concrete. Asbestos is very throughly non-combustible, but rarely used any more due to severe health hazards.

  • Question: Which rare gas is used to weld metals?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 21/10/2015

    Answer:

    In the metal fabrication industry, argon is used to create an inert gas shield during welding. Argon is frequently blended with carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H2), helium (He) or oxygen (O2) to enhance the arc characteristics or facilitate metal transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW or MIG).

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    Comparison chart Animal Cell Plant Cell Cell wall Absent Present (formed of cellulose) Shape Round (irregular shape) Rectangular (fixed shape) Vacuole One or more small vacuoles (much smaller than plant cells). One, large central vacuole taking up 90% of cell volume. Centrioles Present in all animal cells Only present in lower plant forms.

  • Question: Give an idea about the structure of atom.

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 21/10/2015

    Answer:

    xperiments of modern scientists. However, prior to the scientific revolution and the development of the scientific method starting in the 16th century, ideas about the atom were mainly speculative. It wasn't until the very end of the 19th century that technology became advanced enough to allow scientists a glimpse of the atom's constituent parts: the electron, nucleus, proton, and neutron. Greek Origins The idea that all matter is made up of tiny, indivisible particles, or atoms, is believed to have originated with the Greek philosopher Leucippus of Miletus and his student Democritus of Abdera in the 5th century B.C. (The word atom comes from the Greek word atomos, which means “indivisible.”) These thinkers held that, in addition to being too small to be seen, unchangeable, and indestructible, atoms were also completely solid, with no internal structure, and came in an infinite variety of shapes and sizes, which accounted for the different kinds of matter. Color, taste, and other intangible qualities were also thought to be composed of atoms. While the idea of the atom was supported by some later Greek philosophers, it was fiercely attacked by others, including Aristotle, who argued against the existence of such particles. During the Middle Ages in Europe, Roman Catholic theologians were heavily influenced by Aristotle's ideas, and so atomic philosophy was largely dismissed for centuries. However, the Greeks' conception of the atom survived, both in Aristotle's works (his arguments against) and in another classical work by the Roman author Lucretius, De rerum natura (“On the Nature of Things”), which was rediscovered in Europe at the start of the Renaissance. Modern Development Modern atomic theory is generally said to begin with John Dalton, an English chemist and meteorologist who in 1808 published a book on the atmosphere and the behavior of gases that was entitled A New System of Chemical Philosophy. Dalton's theory of atoms rested on four basic ideas: chemical elements were composed of atoms; the atoms of an element were identical in weight; the atoms of different elements had different weights; and atoms combined only in small whole-number ratios, such as 1:1, 1:2, 2:1, 2:3, to form compounds. Not all of these ideas were new; the Greeks had already introduced the idea that elements were composed of atoms and that atoms of different elements had different physical properties. Dalton's particular contribution, which distinguished his work from what had been done before, was his method for actually determining atomic weight. In an essay published in 1805, Dalton had included a list of atomic weights for 21 elements. Dalton was also the first to propose standard symbols for the elements. Subatomic Structure Dalton's work was mainly about the chemistry of atoms—how they combined to form new compounds—rather than the physical, internal structure of atoms, although he never denied the possibility of atoms' having a substructure. Modern theories about the physical structure of atoms did not begin until 1897, with J. J. Thomson's discovery of the electron. Actually, what Thomson discovered was that cathode rays were streams of negatively charged particles with a mass about 1,000 times smaller than a hydrogen atom. He claimed that these particles, which he called “corpuscles,” were the things that atoms were made from. The term “electron” predated Thomson's discovery—a few years earlier Irish physicist G. J. Stoney had proposed that electricity was made of negative particles called “electrons,” and scientists had adopted the word to refer to anything with an electric charge. However, Thomson, who was a physicist at Cambridge University, was the first to suggest that these particles were a building block of the atom. Thomson also tried to show how the electrons were situated in the atom. Since atoms were known to be electrically neutral, Thomson proposed (1904) a model in which the atom was a positively charged sphere studded with negatively charged electrons. It was called the “plum-pudding” model, since the electrons in the atom resembled the raisins in a plum pudding. This model did not survive unchallenged for long. In 1911, Ernest Rutherford's experiments with alpha rays led him to describe the atom as a small, heavy nucleus with electrons in orbit around it. This nuclear model of the atom became the basis for the one that is still accepted today. Bohr and Beyond In 1913, Danish physicist Niels Bohr, who had studied under both Thomson and Rutherford, further refined the nuclear model by proposing that electrons moved only in restricted, successive orbital shells and that the outer, higher-energy orbits determined the chemical properties of the different elements. Furthermore, Bohr was able to explain the spectral lines of the different elements by suggesting that as electrons jumped from higher to lower orbits, they emitted energy in the form of light. In the 1920s, Bohr's theory became the basis for quantum mechanics, which explained in greater detail the complex structure and behavior of atoms. Protons and Neutrons Since Thomson's discovery of the electron in 1897, scientists had realized that an atom must contain a positive charge to counterbalance the electrons' negative charge. In 1919, as a byproduct of his experiments on the splitting of atomic nuclei, Rutherford discovered the proton, which constitutes the nucleus of a hydrogen atom. A proton carries a single positive electrical charge, and every atomic nucleus contains one or more protons. Although Rutherford proposed the existence of a neutral subatomic particle, the neutron, in 1920, the actual discovery was made by English physicist James Chadwick, a former student of Rutherford, in 1932.

  • Question: Who appoints the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    president

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    responsibility Page issues Not to be confused with Collective responsibility. Cabinet collective responsibility, also known as collective ministerial responsibility,[1] is a constitutional convention in governments using the Westminster System that members of the cabinet must publicly support all governmental decisions made in Cabinet, even if they do not privately agree with them. This support includes voting for the government in the legislature. Some Communist political parties apply a similar convention of democratic centralism to their central committee. If a member of the cabinet does wish to openly object to a cabinet decision then they are obliged to resign from their position in the cabinet. Cabinet collective responsibility is related to the fact that, if a vote of no confidence is passed in parliament, the government is responsible collectively, and thus the entire government resigns. The consequence will be that a new government will be formed, or parliament will dissolve and a general election will be called. Cabinet collective responsibility is not the same as individual ministerial responsibility, which states that ministers are responsible and therefore culpable for the running of their departments.

  • Answer:

    The Council of Ministers, typically referred to as just 'the Council', is the EU's main decision-making and legislative body. In conjunction with the European Parliament, the Council of Ministers forms the EU's legislature. The Council of Ministers should not be confused either with the European Council or the Council of Europe. The former is a distinct EU institution that is discussed under below. The latter is an international body, completely separate from the EU, set up in 1949 with the aim of promoting democracy, human rights and the rule of law within its 40 member states. The Council of Ministers comprises ministers from each member state with responsibility for the policy area under discussion. As such, the Council of Ministers is not a body that has a fixed membership - rather it is a legislative concept that is given expression at any given time in one of nine distinct 'councils'.

  • Answer:

    In 1959, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. It marked the first major international consensus on the fundamental principles of children’s rights. Origin of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child In 1924, the League of Nations (LON) adopted the Geneva Declaration, a historic document that recognised and affirmed for the first time the existence of rights specific to children and the responsibility of adults towards children. The United Nations (UN) was founded after World War II. It took over the Geneva Declaration in 1946. However, following the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the advancement of rights revealed the shortcomings of the Geneva Declaration, which therefore had to be expanded.

  • Question: What is residual air?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Definition noun The amount of air that remains in the lungs following a maximal expiration. Supplement The residual air that remains in the lungs and are not expired. In unhealthy conditions such as asthma attack and diffuse obstructive emphysema, the residual volume is higher than normal.

  • Question: Which muscles help in respiration?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    In human physiology, the muscles of respiration are those muscles that contribute to inhalation and exhalation, by aiding in the expansion and contraction of the thoracic cavity. The diaphragm and, to a lesser extent, the intercostal muscles drive respiration during quiet breathing. Additional 'accessory muscles of respiration' are typically only used under conditions of high metabolic demand (e.g. exercise) or respiratory dysfunction (e.g. an asthma attack).

  • Question: Which industry is located near Rihand Project?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Sonbhadra or Sonebhadra is the 2nd largest district of Uttar Pradesh, India.Sonbhadra is the only district in India which borders four states namely Madhya Pradesh, Chhattishgarh Jharkhand and Bihar.The district has an area of 6788 km² and a population of 1,862,559 (2011 census), with a population density of 270 persons per km².It lies in the extreme southeast of the state, and is bounded by Mirzapur District to the northwest, Chandoli District to the north, Kaimur and Rohtas districts of Bihar state to the northeast, Garhwa district of Jharkhand state to the east, Koriya and Surguja districts of Chhattisgarh state to the south, and Singrauli district of Madhya Pradesh state to the west. The district headquarters is in the town of Robertsganj.Sonbhadra district is an industrial zone and it has lots of minerals like bauxite, limestone, coal,gold etc.Sonbhadra is called as Energy Capital of India because there are so many power plants.

  • Answer:

    tropic of cancer

  • Question: What is meant by 'contour interval'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Contour Lines and Intervals. A contour line is a line drawn on a topographic map to indicate ground elevation or depression. A contour interval is the vertical distance or difference in elevation between contour lines.

  • Question: What does RF stand for?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    radio frequency

  • Question: On which river is the Rihand Project located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Rihand Dam (Hindi: रिहन्द बांध) is a concrete gravity dam located at Pipri in Sonbhadra District in Uttar Pradesh, India. Its reservoir area is on the border of Madhya pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. This reservoir is known as Govind Ballabh Pant Sagar. It is on the Rihand River which is the tributary of the Son River.

  • Question: What are the objectives of European Community?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Objectives of the EU The Union’s objectives can be read in the Lisbon Treaty Art. 3 TEU and include, among others: the promotion of peace and the well-being of the Union´s citizens an area of freedom, security and justice without internal frontiers sustainable development based on balanced economic growth and social justice a social market economy - highly competitive and aiming at full employment and social progress a free single market The Union shall also combat social exclusion and discrimination and promote social justice and protection, equality between women and men, solidarity between generations and the protection of childrens' rights. The European Union aslo establish a set of values in Article 2 TEU. The EU Court can take values and aims into account when it decides on case law. Notes The first and most important EU objective was the establishment of a common market. Subsequent treaties included the aims of establishing: an Economic and Monetary Union; a Common Foreign and Security Policy; and, an area of Justice and Home Affairs. The Lisbon Treaty includes an even wider range of objectives.

  • Question: What are the reasons for the importance of Human Rights?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Adopted by the General Assembly on December 10, 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is one of the first major achievements of the United Nations. The United States is a charter member of the United Nations and the U.S. Representative to the U.N., Eleanor Roosevelt, was a lead drafter of the UDHR. The author States of Declaration, from different regions of the world, sought to ensure that the text would incorporate values common to all communities. The States affirmed the universal respect for inalienable rights and fundamental freedoms of each and every person, including the principles of the prohibition against arbitrary detention, the right to due process and other civil and political rights as well as social, cultural and economic rights. Significant development in thinking about human rights had already taken place in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Indeed, the American Declaration of Independence of 1776 stated: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness." While itself a non-binding document, the UDHR arguably is part of customary international law, reflecting the almost universal vision of nations about the universal human rights of all the people. These fundamental human rights should be “a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations” - UDHR Preamble. They are the basic rights that all human beings should enjoy, respect and protect. The UDHR, together with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), its two Optional Protocols, and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), form what is known as International Bill of Human Rights. International human rights law lays down obligations which States are bound to respect. By becoming parties to international treaties, States assume obligations and duties under international law to respect, to protect and to fulfill human rights. The obligation to respect means that States must refrain from interfering with or curtailing the enjoyment of human rights. The obligation to protect requires States to protect individuals and groups against human rights abuses. The obligation to fulfill means that States must take positive action to facilitate the enjoyment of basic human rights. Through ratification of international human rights treaties, Governments undertake to put into place domestic measures and legislation compatible with their treaty obligations and duties. Universal human rights should be applied to all persons without distinction of any kind: we are all human beings, so we are all entitled to enjoy these rights. “Human rights are what reason requires and conscience demands. They are us and we are them. Human rights are rights that any person has as a human being. We are all human beings; we are all deserving of human rights. One cannot be true without the other.” - Kofi Annan, Secretary-general of the United Nations Remember that, as Eleanor Roosevelt said, "the destiny of human rights is in the hands of all our citizens in all our communities." Main menu DWN WHO WE ARE OUR WORK JOIN US NEWS

  • Answer:

    Article 1. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Article 2. Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

  • Question: What is the protective covering of the brain?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The cranium and the cranial meninges surround and protect the brain. The cranial meninges are continuous with the spinal meninges, have the same basic structure, and bear the same names: the outer dura mater, the middle arachnoid mater , and the inner pia mater The cranial dura mater has two layers; the spinal dura mater has only one. The two dural layers are called the periosteal layer (which is external) and the meningeal layer (which is internal). The dural layers around the brain are fused

  • Question: By which process water enters the root hair cell?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Absorption of water and mineral salt take place mainly in the area of the root hair. Each root hair is a fine tube like out-growth of the epidermal cell. It grows in the soil particles. Hence it comes in close contact with the water present in the soil. Dissolved mineral salts are present in the soil water. Therefore the water surrounding each root hair is a dilute solution of mineral salts. Due to a high surface area: volume ratio of the root hair, the rate of water and mineral absorption is enhanced. The sap (plant juice) present in the root hair cell comprises of a relatively strong solution of sugars and various salts. The amount of water in the sap is therefore lower than the soil solution (the sap has a lower water potential). Due to this low water potential and the semi permeable membrane of the root hair cell, water enters in the plant by the process of osmosis. The sap of the cell now becomes more dilute than the sap of the next root hair cell. Hence water passes by osmosis from the root hair cell into the inner cell. Similarly the water passes from the inner cells to the cortex. This transfer process continues till water enters the xylem vessels and travels up the plants.

  • Answer:

    Sebaceous glands are exocrine glands that release sebum. These glands are connected with the hair follicles, and sebum is released through the same pore through which hair grows in most cases. Sebaceous glands are located on every surface of your skin, with the exception of your palms, bottom lip and the soles of your feet. (Which is a good thing. Can you imagine trying to run with oil coming out of the bottom of your feet?) Function of Sebaceous Glands Sebaceous glands function by producing and releasing sebum in order to help protect and lubricate the surface of the skin. Sebum is composed of fat, cellular debris and keratin. This lubrication helps to keep our skin from drying

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    Wildlife Photographer: Job Description, Salary and Requirements Working as a wildlife photographer requires little to no formal education. Learn about the knowledge required, job duties and education of such photographers to see if this is the right career for you. Show me popular schools Essential Information Wildlife photographers provide publications with images of animals, plants and environments from across the globe, although some self-publish as independent artists. In addition to understanding photographic techniques and methods, they must also comprehend the subjects of their images. Because photographers often work on a freelance basis, there are no strict educational standards in the field since clients purchase rights to the photographs themselves. Although post-secondary education in the field may be preferred, possessing hands-on skills with a camera, being able to develop and edit pictures, and possessing raw vision and talent may easily substitute for formal education.

  • Question: Is a career in law a good option?

    Posted in: Law Entrance | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The lowdown Of late, law has become a promising career option. To start early, many aspirants opt for the five-year BALLB course right after Class 12. In addition to the traditional branches such as civil, criminal, corporate, taxation, labour and election law, there are new areas, including space, cyber, intellectual property, and international laws, that a person can specialise in. You could specialise in a particular area depending on your “interest and inclination,” says Pravin H Parekh, president, Supreme Court Bar Association. A number of courses are now available in fields like human rights, intellectual property rights, and cyber law. Ideally, a fresh lawyer should do litigation for five to 10 years, spending two to three years in a trial court to learn cross-examination, pleadings, drafting etc, says Parikh. “The scope is very good. Today’s law students are better equipped than those about 10-15 years ago. Students take law as their first choice now than earlier when it used to be the last resort,” says Parekh Clockwork A typical work day of a lawyer is as follows: 10am: Reach office. Check mails. Start work 10.30am onwards: Meetings with clients, discussions 11.30am: Hearings at court and discussions 3pm: Leave court premises for office 5pm: Counsel clients, draft appeals, prepare documents etc 10 pm: Head home The payoff A fresh independent lawyer earns “zero to Rs. 15,000” a month in litigation. While firms have fewer vacancies, “good” ones noticed in courts get picked by seniors, says Pravin H Parekh, president, Supreme Court Bar Association. Further on, a lawyer’s income depends on factors such as reputation, expertise and kinds of cases handled. There are advocates who are said to charge Rs. 5 lakh to Rs. 1 crore for one court appearance Skills/TRAITS * Good communication skills * Quick responsiveness; excellent memory * Open, flexible mind * Good authoritative leadership qualities * Logical reasoning * Good listening and powerful oratorical skills * Out-of-the-box thinking ability * Knowledge of all statutes, rules and regulations, and notifications * Patience - for some cases can drag on endlessly Getting there Go for either a three-year LLB programme after graduation in any discipline, or for a five-year integrated BA LLB programme after passing Class 12. Admission to these courses is usually through a written competition, such as the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT). You could specialise in a particular area depending on your “interest and inclination,” says Parekh. A number of courses are now available in fields like human rights, intellectual property rights, and cyber law. Ideally, a fresh law

  • Answer:

    Tally is one of those basic-level short-term courses, which is well-known in India. An Accounting course like Tally doesn't require any kind of professional training, and is the same time user-friendly, which is why hordes of tally professionals are available today. However, the Industry has seen some advancement in technology; therefore, better and reliable accounting software has come into existence, known as SAP. With this software, Companies can process larger database with least hurdles and are now seeking candidates who are trained in SAP. It is opening new gates of opportunities for people who are seeking jobs after 12th. BAT, Not Like Other Commerce Courses Business Accounting and Taxation (BAT) is a diploma or short-term course that equips you with the expertise required in the field of Accounting and Compliance. This course will make you job-ready and help you specialize in the field of Accounting and Compliance if you are looking for immediate job opportunities after 12th or Graduation. Integrated with high-end applications like SAP and Advanced excel, this Accounting course will definitely develop the employable skills that are much needed in today's times. This course is indeed an all-rounder short-term course needed for a career after 12th. Career Path after Business Accounting and Taxation Accounts Receivable/Payable- Associate/Sr. Associate: If you love working on Excel, verifying accounts, preparing financial reports, have great data entry and analyzing skills, then this job role will work in your favor. This is a job that you can acquire as a fresh graduate, that too within 6 months or 1 year. General Ledger- Sr. Associate/Analyst: A company's accounting process gets stagnant if it lacks a responsible person who takes care of all the business transactions, one such responsible person is a General ledger Analyst. One has to be familiar with payroll, computer skills, and bookkeeping in order to justify the requirements of this role. If you think you are capable of handling the above responsibilities, then go for it. Accounts Executive: The duty of an Accounts Executive is more than just handling bills and making entries in accounting software. By taking up this role, you take up additional responsibilities like bank reconciliation, monthly book closing, recoding sales invoice and other opportunities that will add value to your career. Assistant / Senior Manager: In this role you would be responsible for provisioning, control, vertical specialization, compliance and risk. An Assistant or Senior Manager is required to look after budget, finalization of accounts, controls credit, and handle over

  • Answer:

    The development of hydroelectric power in any region depends upon physical factors as well as socio-economic factors. Among the physical factors are: Supply of water by heavy rain, snow melt water and springs, Relief to allow drop of water, and location of dams to create water reservoirs. The greater the drop, the more the kinetic energy released by falling water. Among the socio-economic factors are: Demand for electric power and Non-availability of other power resources, such as coal, mineral oil and atomic power. To consider all these factors for India, we may divide the country into three zones namely, high potential, medium potential and low potential.

  • Question: What is the D.V.C.?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    DVC can refer to: Damodar Valley Corporation, a multipurpose river valley project in India Da Vinci Code: The Da Vinci Code, a Dan Brown novel The Da Vinci Code (film), a film based on the novel Deer/Vehicle Collision Delaware Valley College, a private college in Pennsylvania Deputy Vice-Chancellor, a university administrative position Diablo Valley College, a community college in California Digital Video Cassette, the original name of MiniDV video recording format Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas, Latin for "Precicion, Power, Speed" and the motto of the International Practical Shooting Confederation Disney Vacation Club, a vacation timeshare company Distributed Version Control (for example, [GitHub]) Distributed Video Coding Divisional commander Deer Valley Crew Dual Valley Conference, a high school athletic conference in Massachusetts

  • Question: What are the important Hydel power projects in India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Tehri Dam Uttarakhand 2400 MW Srisailam Dam Andhra Pradesh 1670 MW Nagarjunasagar Andhra Pradesh 965 MW Sardar Sarovar Gujarat 1450 MW Baspa-II Himachal Pradesh 300 MW Nathpa Jhakri Himachal Pradesh 1500 MW Bhakra Dam Punjab 1325 MW Dehar Himachal Pradesh 990 MW Baira Suil Himachal Pradesh 180 MW Chamera-I Himachal Pradesh 540 MW Chamera-II Himachal Pradesh 300 MW Pong Himachal Pradesh 396 MW

  • Answer:

    The modernization needs of irrigation system operational management in India Although in India the major consumer of water is irrigated agriculture, the demands for various other competing and conflicting purposes are ever increasing. Ensuring water supplies in sufficient quantity and desired quality, properly distributed in time and space, has become a complex task. Water resource planning and management has become multidisciplinary in nature, requiring co-ordination among various government and non-government agencies. Making optimum use of water resources has long engaged human effort but it is only in recent times that it has taken the form of integrated water resources development and management. Pressure on the available water resources for conflicting uses has become so great that individual water resources projects, whether single purpose or multipurpose, cannot be undertaken or managed with optimum benefit unless there is a broad plan for the entire drainage area. Integrated development and management thus involves a co-ordinated and harmonious development of the various works (existing and new) in relation to all reasonable possibilities. This may include irrigation and drainage, generation of electrical energy, navigation, flood control, watershed management, industrial and domestic use of water, recreation and conservation of wildlife. Water resources development planning has traditionally been attempted at state level, as in the case of other sectors, although it is well known that water does not obey political or administrative boundaries. Yet a river basin or a sub-basin should be the basic hydrological unit for water resource planning. In the early stages of water resource development, projects were formulated to serve mainly irrigation requirements or irrigation combined with hydropower generation and some other incidental purposes. As projects were relatively few, inter-project considerations were more or less absent and each project was considered and planned as an independent entity. In spite of substantial growth in irrigated agriculture and consequent agricultural productivity over the years, irrigation systems in India are still facing many problems. The root cause of the poor performance of our irrigation systems may be the lack of scientific approach to their management. On most command areas served by a canal, water is poorly distributed over area and time. A common shortcoming is that tail-end users are not getting water or are getting insufficient and unreliable water. Conversely, head-end users often get too much water, either because they have no choice or deliberately, taking water when they can and often more than needed. Low irrigation efficiency is also attributed to changes in cropping patterns. In many cases, the cropping pattern actually adopted by the farmers is very different from the designed cropping pattern because it is mostly influenced by market forces, farmers' preferences, reliability of water supply and other factors. The on-farm irrigation practice prevailing in the country also results in wastage leading to low irrigation efficiency. Most farmers still irrigate the way their forefathers did thousands of years ago by flooding or channelling water through parallel furrows. This gravity system, typically least expensive to install, fails to distribute water evenly. Farmers are forced to apply an excessive amount of water to ensure that enough reaches the plants situated on higher ground or on the far side of a field. The adoption of field-to-field irrigation adds to the problem, as does poorly conceived irrigation scheduling. Modernization of irrigation system operational management by way of canal automation The overall water use efficiency of a manually operated system, exclusive of the use of any return flow, seldom exceeds 40 percent. It is reasonable to expect an increase of the overall efficiency of about 10 percent or more for a system with some automation. The advantages of automation are not limited to savings in operation cost and in water. It also alleviates the risk of waterlogging and salinization. A further advantage is that it increases the reliability and accuracy of water distribution. This contributes to the establishment of a climate of confidence between the operating authority and the farmers, which in turn contributes to the effective organization of water user groups and their participation in operation and maintenance activities. With automation, it may also be possible to accurately know the volume of water delivered to individuals or groups of farmers. This makes possible the introduction of volumetric water charges, combined or not with a system of annual volumetric allocation. This approach is a useful tool for encouraging farmers to optimize the use of limited water allocations and to increase productivity. Improvements in automatic control equipment have greatly expanded the field of canal operation and control. Automation has become a common term when discussing modern canal systems. `Automation' is defined as A procedure or control method used to operate a water system by mechanical or electronic equipment that takes the place of human observation, effort and decision; the condition of being automatically controlled or operated. Automating a canal system is therefore implementing a control system that includes automatic monitoring or the control equipment that upgrades the conventional method of canal system operation. Automation is used to simplify and reduce or replace the decision-making process of the operators and to implement a decision. It is increasingly used to improve the effectiveness and to reduce the cost of water supply system operations. Automation of distribution canals becomes essential for optimum conditions. The process must not be dismissed out of hand as too expensive. Its economics must be studied, keeping in mind that reduced on-farm costs and water requirements, and increased yields and management capabilities, provide savings that usually will more than make up for increased project costs. Reduction of project operation costs and water loss is also a benefit of automation and is usually the only one considered. Automation of a canal system should not be thought of as an end in itself, but rather as a means to better operate that system. The true goal should be to achieve the most efficient and beneficial operation possible. Expanding control system capabilities is one way of economically reaching this goal. Automation can be obtained in many ways, some extremely simple, others very complex. A long crested weir (also called duckbill or folded weir) by its very existence maintains a nearly constant water level in a canal under variable flows. A closed pipe line system connected to a variable source such as a canal carrying excess water to local needs, will automatically convey the exact amount of water that is withdrawn at the turnout valves. Float-actuated mechanical devices such as the Neyrtec constant level and the improved controlled leak canal gates are self-contained but can obtain a constant canal water level. These systems easily adjust to variable flow rates. If they are desired to control down to the no-flow regime rather than just regulate the flow, they need to be installed in top-level canals. They are sluggish in reaction as they receive input in sequence from each adjacent reach to transmit a change over the whole canal length. The objective of building and operating a canal system is to serve the farmlands, supply municipal and industrial needs, carry storm runoff to natural drainage channels, collect water from several independent sources into a single supply, convey water used for the generation of electrical power and supply water to fish and wildlife and for recreation. In order to serve the above purposes as efficiently and economically as practicable, canal operations should be tailored to meet the specific requirements of the systems.

  • Answer:

    ADVANTAGES: 1. Once a dam is constructed, electricity can be produced at a constant rate. 2. If electricity is not needed, the sluice gates can be shut, stopping electricity generation. The water can be saved for use another time when electricity demand is high. 3. Dams are designed to last many decades and so can contribute to the generation of electricity for many years / decades. 4. The lake that forms behind the dam can be used for water sports and leisure / pleasure activities. Often large dams become tourist attractions in their own right. 5. The lake's water can be used for irrigation purposes. 6. The build up of water in the lake means that energy can be stored until needed, when the water is released to produce electricity. 7. When in use, electricity produced by dam systems do not produce green house gases. They do not pollute the atmosphere. DISADVANATGES: 1. Dams are extremely expensive to build and must be built to a very high standard. 2. The high cost of dam construction means that they must operate for many decades to become profitable. 3. The flooding of large areas of land means that the natural environment is destroyed. 4. People living in villages and towns that are in the valley to be flooded, must move out. This means that they lose their farms and businesses. In some countries, people are forcibly removed so that hydro-power schemes can go ahead. 5. The building of large dams can cause serious geological damage. For example, the building of the Hoover Dam in the USA triggered a number of earth quakes and has depressed the earths surface at its location.

  • Question: What does the term Human Rights mean?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    What are human rights? Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. Universal human rights are often expressed and guaranteed by law, in the forms of treaties, customary international law , general principles and other sources of international law. International human rights law lays down obligations of Governments to act in certain ways or to refrain from certain acts, in order to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms of individuals or groups. Universal and inalienable The principle of universality of human rights is the cornerstone of international human rights law. This principle, as first emphasized in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights in 1948, has been reiterated in numerous international human rights conventions, declarations, and resolutions. The 1993 Vienna World Conference on Human Rights, for example, noted that it is the duty of States to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems.

  • Question: What is the functions of the General Assembly?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Functions and powers of the General Assembly Forum for multilateral negotiation Established in 1945 under the Charter of the United Nations, the General Assembly occupies a central position as the chief deliberative, policymaking and representative organ of the United Nations. Comprising all 193 Members of the United Nations, it provides a unique forum for multilateral discussion of the full spectrum of international issues covered by the Charter. It also plays a significant role in the process of standard-setting and the codification of international law. The Assembly meets from September to December each year, and thereafter as required. Functions and powers of the General Assembly The Assembly is empowered to make recommendations to States on international issues within its competence. The Assembly has initiated actions — political, economic, humanitarian, social and legal — which have affected the lives of millions of people throughout the world. The landmark Millennium Declaration, adopted in 2000, and the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document reflect the commitment of Member States to reach specific goals to attain peace, security and disarmament along with development and poverty eradication; to safeguard human rights and promote the rule of law; to protect our common environment; to meet the special needs of Africa; and to strengthen the United Nations. During the 69th session, a process of intergovernmental negotiations — held in informal meetings of the General Assembly plenary — was launched with the goal of building consensus among countries towards the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda. According to the Charter of the United Nations, the General Assembly may: Consider and approve the United Nations budget and establish the financial assessments of Member States; Elect the non-permanent members of the Security Council and the members of other United Nations councils and organs and, on the recommendation of the Security Council, appoint the Secretary-General; Consider and make recommendations on the general principles of cooperation for maintaining international peace and security, including disarmament; Discuss any question relating to international peace and security and, except where a dispute or situation is currently being discussed by the Security Council, make recommendations on it; Discuss, with the same exception, and make recommendations on any questions within the scope of the Charter or affecting the powers and functions of any organ of the United Nations; Initiate studies and make recommendations to promote international political cooperation, the development and codification of international law, the realization of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and international collaboration in the economic, social, humanitarian, cultural, educational and health fields; Make recommendations for the peaceful settlement of any situation that might impair friendly relations among nations; Consider reports from the Security Council and other United Nations organs. The Assembly may also take action in cases of a threat to the peace, breach of peace or act of aggression, when the Security Council has failed to act owing to the negative vote of a permanent member. In such instances, according to its “Uniting for Peace” resolution of November 1950 (resolution 377 (V)), the Assembly may consider the matter immediately and recommend to its Members collective measures to maintain or restore international peace and security (See "Special sessions and emergency special sessions”). The search for consensus Each of the 193 Member States in the Assembly has one vote. Votes taken on designated important issues — such as recommendations on peace and security, the election of Security Council and Economic and Social Council members, and budgetary questions — require a two-thirds majority of Member States, but other questions are decided by simple majority. In recent years, an effort has been made to achieve consensus on issues, rather than deciding by a formal vote, thus strengthening support for the Assembly’s decisions. The President, after having consulted and reached agreement with delegations, can propose that a resolution be adopted without a vote. Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly There has been a sustained effort to make the work of the General Assembly more focused and relevant. This was identified as a priority during the 58th session, and efforts continued at subsequent sessions to streamline the agenda, improve the practices and working methods of the Main Committees, enhance the role of the General Committee, strengthen the role and authority of the President and examine the Assembly’s role in the process of selecting the Secretary-General. As a result of the ongoing revitalization of its work for instance, the General Assembly now elects its President, Vice-Presidents and Chairs of the Main Committees according to its rules of procedure, at least three months in advance of the start of the new session in order to further strengthen coordination and preparation of work among the Main Committees and between the Committees and the Plenary.

  • Answer:

    The Congress was not consistent on the Partition. On April 2, 1942, the Congress Working Committee criticized the secessionist idea. Congress Image Courtesy : 2.bp.blogspot.com/_pCG_c3Rq788/S6s1GPk8UvI/1947.jpg But at the same time Congress committee said that it cannot think in terms of compelling the people of any territorial unit to remain in the Indian Union against their declared and established will. Its election manifesto of 1945 reiterated this principle, thus setting at naught the Jagat Narain Lai resolution, adopted by the All India Congress Committee (AICC) on May 2, 1942, which ruled out liberty to any component State or territorial unit to secede. Rajaji’s formula, in March 1944, accepted plebiscite on Partition in areas where in the Muslim population is in absolute majority. On September 24, 1944 Gandhi himself offered Jinnah his plan for “two sovereign independent States” with a Treaty of Separation on defense, foreign affairs, etc. Thus, from 1940 onwards, the trend was unmistakably against India’s unity. Both Gandhi and the Congress had accepted the principle of Partition, based on consent of the areas concerned. Time was fast running out on India’s unity. The British government’s statement on December 6, 1946 rejected the Congress interpretation of the grouping formula and expressed its view that here has never been any prospect of success for the Constituent Assembly except upon the basis of the agreed procedure. Should a Constitution come to be framed by the Constituent Assembly in which a large section of the Indian population had not been represented, His Majesty’s Government could not, of course, contemplate as the Congress have stated they would not contemplate forcing such a Constitution upon any unwilling parts of the country. This gave the Congress one of two choices – unqualified acceptance of the Cabinet Mission’s Plan or Partition. It preferred the latter. Once again, Gandhi rejected the Plan. But the direct action day observed by Muslim league and the following incidents of Hindu-Muslim riot made Congress believe that partition was the only option if otherwise there could be lasting peace even if British leave India. And so Congress accepted the partition.

  • Question: What was the British reaction to the Quit India Movement?

    Posted in: History | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Quit India Movement (Hindi: भारत छोड़ो आन्दोलन Bhārat Chhodho Āndolan), or the India August Movement (August Kranti), was a civil disobedience movement launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on 8 August 1942, during World War II, demanding an end to British Rule of India.[1] The Cripps Mission had failed, and on 8 August 1942, Gandhi made a call to Do or Die in his Quit India speech delivered in Mumbai at the Gowalia Tank Maidan. The All-India Congress Committee launched a mass protest demanding what Gandhi called "An Orderly British Withdrawal" from India. Even though it was wartime, the British were prepared to act. Almost the entire leadership of the INC was imprisoned without trial within hours of Gandhi's speech. Most spent the rest of the war in prison and out of contact with the masses. The British had the support of the Viceroy's Council (which had a majority of Indians), of the All India Muslim League, the Communist Party, the princely states, the Indian Imperial Police, the British Indian Army and the Indian Civil Service. Many Indian businessmen profiting from heavy wartime spending did not support Quit India. Many students paid more attention to Subhas Chandra Bose, who was in exile and supporting the Axis Powers. The only outside support came from the Americans, as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressured Prime Minister Winston Churchill to give in to some of the Indian demands. The Quit India campaign was effectively crushed.[2] The British refused to grant immediate independence, saying it could happen only after the war against the Axis powers had ended. Procession view at Bengaluru Sporadic small-scale violence took place around the country and the British arrested tens of thousands of leaders, keeping them imprisoned until 1945. In terms of immediate objectives Quit India failed because of heavy-handed suppression, weak coordination and the lack of a clear-cut programme of action. However, the British government realised that India was ungovernable in the long run due to the cost of World War II, and the question for postwar became how to exit gracefully and peacefully.

  • Question: The first biosphere reserve was?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve was the first biosphere reserve in India established in the year 1986, located in the Western Ghats and Nilgiri Hills ranges of South India. Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, is a World Heritage Site declared by UNESCO in 2012 and includes the Mudumalai, Mukurthi, Wayanad and Bandipur national parks.

  • Question: What is the scientific name of great Indian bustard?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Great Indian Bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps) or Indian bustard is a bustard found in India and the adjoining regions of Pakistan. A large bird with a horizontal body and long bare legs, giving it an ostrich like appearance, this bird is among the heaviest of the flying birds. Once common on the dry plains of the Indian subcontinent, as few as 250 individuals were estimated in 2011 to survive and the species is critically endangered by hunting and loss of its habitat, which consists of large expanses of dry grassland and scrub. These birds are often found associated in the same habitat as blackbuck.

  • Question: What is a spur?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    noun 1. a device with a small spike or a spiked wheel that is worn on a rider's heel and used for urging a horse forward. 2. a thing that prompts or encourages someone; an incentive. "wars act as a spur to practical invention" synonyms: stimulus, incentive, encouragement, stimulant, stimulation, inducement, impetus, prod, prompt; More verb 1. urge (a horse) forward by digging one's spurs into its sides. "she spurred her horse towards the hedge" 2. prune in (a side shoot of a plant) so as to form a spur close to the stem. "spur back the lateral shoots"

  • Question: What is anthophore?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    a form of floral stalk, produced by the elongation of the internode between the calyx and the corolla, and bearing the corolla, stamens, and pistil. Origin of anthophore Expand. Greek.

  • Question: Which inflorescence does aloe vera have?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    The inflorescence is a dense raceme (i.e. indeterminate inflorescence with pedicellate flowers) borne on a peduncle arising from the center of the leaf rosette. The flowers are pendant, with a tubular yellow perianth around 2 cm. long. The plant bears fruit which is triangular in shape and has many seeds in it.

  • Question: Which plant is also known as serpent wood?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Acacia xiphophylla, commonly known as snakewood or snake-wood, is a tree in the family Fabaceae. Endemic to Western Australia, it occurs on saline semi-arid land in the Gascoyne River and Ashburton catchments east and north of Carnarvon. Snakewood grows as a spreading tree, usually with two or three main trunks. It can grow up to five metres high and eight metres wide. Like most Acacia species, it has phyllodes rather than true leaves. These are bluish grey in colour, and may be up to eight centimetres long and eight millimetres wide. The flowers are yellow, and held in cylindrical clusters about three centimetres long. The pods are up to twelve centimetres long and eight millimetres wide, and have constrictions between the seeds. The wood of other trees with wavy grain or wavy coloration has also been called snakewood.

  • Question: Which part of the cell is associated with heredity?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 28/01/2016

    Answer:

    Chromosomes contain almost all of the genetic information that determines inheritance. Different plant and animal species have different shapes and numbers of chromosomes. Humans normally have 46 and our nearest living relatives, the chimpanzees and gorillas, have 48. Having more chromosomes does not necessarily mean that an organism is structurally more complex. For instance, chickens have 78, and there is a fern species that has 1260. More extraordinary still is a microscopic single celled organism named Oxytricha click this icon to hear the preceding term pronounced. It has approximately 46 million chromosomes. Having the same number of chromosomes does not mean that two animals are the same species. This can be seen readily from the comparisons in the table on the right. Within a species, different chromosomes are visually distinguishable on the basis of their size and the form of their components. The contracted strands form arms or chromatids click this icon to hear the preceding term pronounced. The point of attachment of two or more chromatids is called a centromere click this icon to hear the preceding term pronounced.

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