MPT - 73671

Kiran K Male, 28 Years

Associated for 8 Years 4 Months
Engineering Subjects Tutor

Activity Score - 1241

  • Total Experience:
    12 Years
  • Hourly Fees:
    INR 600
Tutoring Experience :
I have been teaching Mathematics, Physics, Business Maths, Chemistry to the students of class VI - XII of all boards and Mathematics, Civil, Mechanical, Drawing to the engineering students of college level since last six years. My teaching style is unique it is beneficial for boards as well as competitive examination.
Tutoring Option :
Home Tuition Only
Tutoring Approach :
I approach tutoring in such a way that I show the students the basics, and then give them a variety of practice exercises and urge them figure out the answers themselves. If in doubt, I would keep prompting them to find the right answers thereby helping them to grasp the right concepts.
Teaches:
Class 9 - 10 Mathematics Physics Chemistry All Boards INR 500 / Hour
Class 11 - 12 Mathematics Physics Business Mathematics Chemistry All Boards INR 600 / Hour
Engineering Subjects Mathematics Civil Mechanical Drawing INR 600 / Hour
Class 6 - 8 Mathematics Physics Chemistry All Subjects All Boards INR 400 / Hour
  • Question: Who started the Non-Aligned Movement?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru; Indonesia's first president, Sukarno; Egypt's second president, Gamal Abdel Nasser; Ghana's first president Kwame Nkrumah; and Yugoslavia's president, Josip Broz Tito started Non-Aligned Movement

  • Question: What are the various psychometric properties of air ?

    Posted in: Mechanical | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Relative humidity, Humidity Ratio, Specific humidity, Dry bulb temperature, Wet bulb temperature, Dew Point Temperature, Vapour Pressure, Enthalpy, Degree of saturation & Specific Volume

  • Answer:

    Different physical & chemical characteristics of crude oil are Specific gravity, Surface tension, Viscosity, Pour point, Flash point, Solubility in water and how these parameters change with time, These parameters are measured at standard temperature and atmospheric pressure

  • Question: What are engineering applications of cryogenics?

    Posted in: Mechanical | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Liquefied gases, such as liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, are used in many cryogenic applications, Some other Applications are Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR), Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Electric power transmission, Forward looking infrared (FLIR)

  • Answer:

    A clutch is a mechanism designed to disconnect and reconnect driving and driven members, Heat is the enemy of friction clutches, brakes, and clutch-brakes. Most often, the enemy is within. You must keep it neutralized

  • Question: What are the various sources of heat load ?

    Posted in: Mechanical | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    1) Friction 2) Heat from the human beings 3) Outdoor air heat 4) Heat from the electrical and electronic appliances

  • Question: What are the thermal considerations in brake design?

    Posted in: Mechanical | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    During braking the kinetic energy of the car is converted into thermal energy through friction in the brakes. The heat from the rotors can have detrimental effect on the performance of the brake and other components of the car, Once the rotor and the pad temperature get high (over 400ºC) brake fades sets in. Brake fade reduces the brake torque for a given actuation, So they consider the Material which absorbs large heat fastly

  • Question: Why was the Dandi March undertaken by Mahatma Gandhi?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Dandi March was Initiated by Mohandas Gandhi in order to allow the extraction and production of salt from seawater as was the practice of the Bhartiya (Indian) people

  • Answer:

    Kesari (newspaper)

  • Answer:

    The 31st Session of the Congress was held at Lucknow in 1916 which moderates and the extremists  joined together, The Congress and Muslim league  Co-operated with each other to achieve self Government, It was at this session Jawaharlal Nehru met Gandhiji for the first time.

  • Question: Which factors helped in the growth of Nationalism?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Many causes contributed to the emergence of the nationalist movement in India. They were as follows: 1. British Imperialism 2. Influence of the Western Civilization 3. Spread of English Language 4. Development of Means of Communication 5. The Contribution of the Scholars 6. The Contribution of the Social and Religious Reformers 7. Influence of the Western Civilization 8. Spread of English Language 9. The Development of Indian Press and Literature 10. Economic Exploitation 11. Discrimination against Indians in the Appointment to Government Services 12. Racial Jealousies 13. The Events of the Reign of Lord Lytton 14. Ilbert Bill Controversy

  • Question: Who founded the Theosophical Society?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Helena Blavatsky

  • Question: Who is the head of the Municipal Corporation?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Mayor is the head of the Municipal Corporations in India. The Municipal Commissioner is the official in charge of this organization.

  • Question: What are the main objectives of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is a permanent, intergovernmental Organization, created at the Baghdad Conference on September 10–14, 1960, objective is to co-ordinate and unify petroleum policies among Member Countries, in order to secure fair and stable prices for petroleum producers; an efficient, economic and regular supply of petroleum to consuming nations; and a fair return on capital to those investing in the industry

  • Question: What is the term of office of the Gram Panchayat?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Five years

  • Answer:

    The original jurisdiction of a court is the power to hear a case for the first time, as opposed to appellate jurisdiction, when a higher court has the power to review a lower court's decision.

  • Question: What is the main condition for membership of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The OPEC aims to contribute to public knowledge by disseminating information about its activities. The use of the data, analysis and any other information contained on this website constitutes an agreement between OPEC and the reader under the Terms and Conditions herein stipulated

  • Answer:

    Collective responsibility, also known as collective ministerial responsibility,[1] is a constitutional convention in governments using the Westminster System that members of the cabinet must publicly support all governmental decisions made in Cabinet, even if they do not privately agree with them. This support includes voting for the government in the legislature. Some Communist political parties apply a similar convention of democratic centralism to their central committee. If a member of the cabinet does wish to openly object to a cabinet decision then they are obliged to resign from their position in the cabinet.

  • Question: Can the legislative Council of a State be dissolved?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Yes, Notwithstanding anything in article 168, Parliament may by law provide for the abolition of the Legislative Council of a State having such a Council or for the creation of such a Council in a State having no such Council, if the Legislative Assembly of the State passes a resolution to that effect by a majority of the total membership of the Assembly and by a majority of not less than two-thirds of the members of the Assembly present and voting.

  • Answer:

    Jawaharlal Nehru's concept of nonalignment brought India considerable international prestige among newly independent states that shared India's concerns about the military confrontation between the superpowers and the influence of the former colonial powers. New Delhi used nonalignment to establish a significant role for itself as a leader of the newly independent world in such multilateral organisations as the United Nations (UN) and the Nonaligned Movement

  • Answer:

    The main aim of the EEC, as stated in its preamble, was to "preserve peace and liberty and to lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe". Calling for balanced economic growth, this was to be accomplished through:

    The establishment of a customs union with a common external tariff Common policies for agriculture, transport and trade, including standardization (for example, the CE marking designates standards compliance) Enlargement of the EEC to the rest of Europe

  • Question: What was the Mountbatten Plan for the transfer of power?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    3 June Plan, This was also known as the Mountbatten Plan. The British government proposed a plan announced on 3 June 1947 that included these principles: 1.Principle of Partition of India was accepted by the British Government 2.Successor governments would be given dominion status 3.Implicit right to secede from the British Commonwealth The Indian Independence Act 1947 was the implementation of June 3 Plan

  • Question: What is meant by the term "Provincial Autonomy"?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Provincial autonomy is its basic idea, as the contemplated Federation presumes the existence of provinces independent of outside control, and responsible for their government within defined limits.

  • Question: What was the Divide and Rule Policy of the British?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Divide and rule (or divide and conquer) is gaining and maintaining power by breaking up larger concentrations of power into pieces that individually have less power than the one implementing the strategy. The concept refers to a strategy that breaks up existing power structures and prevents smaller power groups from linking up.

  • Answer:

    The 'non-cooperation phase was a significant phase of the Indian independence movement from British rule. It was led by Mahatma Gandhi and was supported by the Indian National Congress. Gandhiji started the non-cooperation movement for removing British in January 1920 after the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre. It aimed to resist British rule in India through nonviolent means. Protestors would refuse to buy British goods, adopt the use of local handicrafts, pocket liquor shops

  • Question: What are Governor's judicial powers?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Governor has power to pardon, commute and suspend sentences of any person affected on any offences against any law relating to matters to which the executive power of the State extends. These powers are not expected to be exercised arbitrarily except for good and sufficient reasons. Senior Judicial appointments in States are also made in the name of the Governor. The Governor is above law. He cannot be sued in any Court for civil and criminal matters. These immunities are generally accorded to all Heads of the States. He is also consulted in case of appointment of Judges of the High Court of the State.

  • Question: What are Governor's executive powers?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Executive Power of the State is vested with the Governor who is empowered to exercise it either directly or through officers subordinate to him. All executive actions of the State Government are done in his name. He is authorized to make rules regarding the way in which orders and instructions made and executed in his name are to be authenticated.

    His executive power includes the power of appointment. He appoints the Chief Minister of the State and other Ministers are appointed by him on the advice of the Chief Minister. He allocates the various portfolios among the members of the Council of Ministers. He also appoints the Advocate-General, the Chairman and members of the Public Service Commission. He is consulted in the appointment of the Judges of the High Court of the State.

  • Answer:

    All India Forward Bloc

  • Question: Who was the first Viceroy of India?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Warren Hastings, the first Governor-General of Fort William from 1773 to 1785. Many parts of the Indian peninsula were governed by the East India Company, which nominally acted as the agent of the Mughal Emperor.

  • Answer:

    The first session was held from 28–31 December 1885, in Gokuldas Sanskrit college, Mumbai

  • Question: How is the Chief Minister of a State appointed?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

     The Governor appoints and swears in the Chief Minister, whose council of ministers are collectively responsible to the assembly.

  • Answer:

    not less than 25 years of age, to be member of the Legislative Assembly

  • Question: What are the objectives of ASEAN?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The ASEAN Declaration states that the aims and purposes of the Association are: (1) to accelerate the economic growth, social progress and cultural development in the region through joint endeavors in the spirit of equality and partnership in order to strengthen the foundation for a prosperous and peaceful community of Southeast Asian nations, and (2) to promote regional peace and stability through abiding respect for justice and the rule of law in the relationship among countries in the region and adherence to the principles of the United Nations Charter. In 1995, the ASEAN Heads of State and Government re-affirmed that "Cooperative peace and shared prosperity shall be the fundamental goals of ASEAN."

  • Question: What are the objectives of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    OPEC's objective is to co-ordinate and unify petroleum policies among Member Countries, in order to secure fair and stable prices for petroleum producers; an efficient, economic and regular supply of petroleum to consuming nations; and a fair return on capital to those investing in the industry.

  • Question: Which countries are the members of SAARC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The member states are Afghanistan,Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. SAARC was founded by seven states in 1985.

  • Question: When and where was the EEC founded?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The European Economic Community (EEC) was a regional organisation which aimed to bring about economic integration between its member states. It was created by the Treaty of Rome in March 25, 1957

  • Answer:

    High Commissioner

  • Question: What is meant by 'Disarmament'?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    Disarmament is the act of reducing, limiting, or abolishing weapons. Disarmament generally refers to a country's military or specific type of weaponry. Disarmament is often taken to mean total elimination of weapons of mass destruction, such as nuclear arms. General and Complete Disarmament was defined by the United Nations General Assembly as the elimination of all WMD, coupled with the balanced reduction of armed forces and conventional armaments, based on the principle of undiminished security of the parties with a view to promoting or enhancing stability at a lower military level, taking into account the need of all States to protect their security

  • Question: What are the principles of the Panch Sheel?

    Posted in: History | Date: 18/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, known in India as thePanchsheel Treaty (from Sanskrit, panch:five, sheel:virtues), are a series of principles which formed the bedrock of the relationship between India and the people's republic of China.

  • Question: What is borax bead test?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The bead test is a traditional part of qualitative inorganic analysis to test for the presence of certain metals, The oldest one is the borax bead test or blister test, A small loop is made in the end of a platinum or Nichrome wire (as used in the flame test) and heated in a Bunsen flame until red hot. It is then dipped into powdered borax, and the adhering solid is held in the hottest part of the flame where it swells up as it loses its water of crystallization and then shrinks, forming a colourless, transparent glass-like bead (a mixture of sodium metaborate and boric anhydride)

  • Question: What are the monomers of Buna-S?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Monomers of Buna-S are styrene and butadiene

  • Question: What is the use of a) diclofenac b) equanil

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Diclofenac is used to relieve pain, swelling (inflammation), and joint stiffness caused by arthritis. Reducing these symptoms helps you do more of your normal daily activities. This medication is known as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

    Equanil medication is used short-term to treat symptoms of anxiety and nervousness. It acts on certain centers of the brain to help calm your nervous system.

  • Question: What are ar functional groups present in anisole?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Fuctional Group's present in Anisole are Methoxy & Methyl group

  • Answer:

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is an organic compound with the molecular formula CH3NCO. Synonyms are isocyanatomethane, methyl carbylamine, and MIC. Methyl isocyanate is an intermediate chemical in the production of carbamate pesticides (such as carbaryl, carbofuran, methomyl, and aldicarb), Bhopal disaster is the event caused due to leakage, Thousands inhaled and died, Many more were affected.

  • Question: What were the 3 main points in bohr's model of an atom?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    1. Electrons orbit the nucleus in orbits that have a set size and energy. 2. The energy of the orbit is related to its size. The lowest energy is found in the smallest orbit. 3. Radiation is absorbed or emitted when an electron moves from one orbit to another.

  • Question: What are the various series of hydrogen spectrum?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Various series of hydrogen spectrum are Lyman series (n′ = 1), Balmer series (n′ = 2),     Paschen series (Bohr series n' = 3), Brackett series (n′ = 4), Pfund series (n′ = 5), Humphreys series (n′ = 6)

  • Question: Elaborate Wolf kishner reduction.

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Wolff–Kishner reduction is a reaction used in organic chemistry to convert carbonyl functionalities into methylene groups. In the context of complex molecule synthesis, it is most frequently employed to remove a carbonyl group after it has served its synthetic purpose of activating an intermediate in a preceding step. As such, there is no obvious retron for this reaction. Originally reported by Nikolai Kischner in 1911 and Ludwig Wolff in 1912, it has been applied to the total synthesis of scopadulcic acid B, aspidospermidine and dysidiolide

  • Question: What is carbon dating?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Carbon dating is a variety of radioactive dating which is applicable only to matter which was once living and presumed to be in equilibrium with the atmosphere, taking in carbon dioxide from the air for photosynthesis, Radiocarbon dating (also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14 C), a radioactive isotope of carbon.

  • Question: What is the kinetic energy of an election in nth orbit?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    K.E = mv2/2 = mZ2e4/8ε02h2n2

  • Question: what is the use of tollens reagent?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Tollens' reagent is a chemical reagent used to determine the presence of an aldehyde or alpha-hydroxy ketone functional groups. The reagent consists of a solution of silver nitrate and ammonia. It was named after its discoverer, the German chemist Bernhard Tollens. A positive test with Tollens' reagent is indicated by the precipitation of elemental silver, often producing a characteristic "silver mirror" on the inner surface of the reaction vessel.

  • Question: what happens during nuclear fusion?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    when similar nuclei collide and form a new heavier nuclei.  this process releases huge amounts of energy much more than nuclear fission. 

    this is due to the well known equation E = mc^2

  • Question: what is Moseley's law?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Moseley's law is an empirical law concerning the characteristic x-rays that are emitted by atoms. The law was discovered and published by the English physicist Henry Moseley in 1913. It is historically important in quantitatively justifying the conception of the nuclear model of the atom, with all, or nearly all, positive charges of the atom located in the nucleus, and associated on an integer basis with atomic number.

  • Question: what are thermionic emissions?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Thermionic emission is the thermally induced flow of charge carriers from a surface or over a potential-energy barrier. This occurs because the thermal energy given to the carrier overcomes the work function of the material. The charge carriers can be electrons orions, and in older literature are sometimes referred to as "thermions". After emission, a charge that is equal in magnitude and opposite in sign to the total charge emitted is initially left behind in the emitting region.

  • Question: give an example of a moderator used in atomic reactor?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Commonly used moderators include regular (light) water (roughly 75% of the world's reactors), solid graphite (20% of reactors) and heavy water (5% of reactors). Beryllium has also been used in some experimental types, and hydrocarbons have been suggested as another possibility.

  • Question: what are the various configurations of a transistor?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    There are three basic circuit configurations that can be used with transistors Known as common emitter, common base and common collector, these three circuit configurations have different attributes.

  • Question: Where is the Central Secretariat of ASEAN located?

    Posted in: History | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Jakarta, Indonesia

  • Answer:

    not less than 30 years as per Article 173 of Indian Constitution to be a member of the Legislative Council.

  • Question: What is modulus of rigidity?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Modulus of Rigidity - G  - (or Shear Modulus) is the coefficient of elasticity for a shearing force. It is defined as "the ratio of shear stress to the displacement per unit sample length (shear strain)", Modulus of Rigidity can be experimentally determined from the slope of a stress-strain curve created during tensile tests conducted on a sample of the material.

  • Question: What is a full wave rectifier?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    A full-wave rectifier converts the whole of the input waveform to one of constant polarity (positive or negative) at its output. Full-wave rectification converts both polarities of the input waveform to pulsating DC (direct current), and yields a higher average output voltage. Two diodes and a center tapped transformer, or four diodes in a bridge configurationand any AC source (including a transformer without center tap), are needed.[3] Single semiconductor diodes, double diodes with common cathode or common anode, and four-diode bridges, are manufactured as single components.

  • Answer:

    Relation between the elastic constants E, µ and k

    E=3k(1-2μ)

  • Question: Chemical formula of gammaxene?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Gammexane Compound Name:Lindane Compound Name (CAS):1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane Compound Name (IUPAC):1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane Molecular Formula:C6H6Cl6

  • Question: What is Westron and westrosol?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    1,1,2,2 – tetrachloro ethane or acetylene tetrachloride is called westron and

    Trichloro ethylene ( CHCl = CCl2) is called westrol.

  • Question: What is stokes law?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Stokes’s law,  mathematical equation that expresses the settling velocities of small spherical particles in a fluid medium. The law, first set forth by the British scientist Sir George G. Stokes in 1851, is derived by consideration of the forces acting on a particular particle as it sinks through a liquid column under the influence of gravity. The force acting in resistance to the fall is equal to 6πrηv, in which r is the radius of the sphere, η is the viscosity of the liquid, and v is the velocity of fall. The force acting downward is equal to 4/3πr3 (d1 - d2)g, in which d1 is the density of the sphere, d2 is the density of the liquid, and g is the gravitational constant. At a constant velocity of fall the upward and downward forces are in balance. Equating the two expressions given above and solving for v therefore yields the required velocity, expressed by Stokes’s law as v = 2/9(d1 - d2)gr2/η

  • Question: What Is critical velocity?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Critical velocity is the speed that a falling object reaches when gravity and air resistance equalize on the object. constant velocity of a superfluid in capillaries which is equivalent to the bandgap width divided by the fermi momentum (otherwise known as critical speed or the Landau critical velocity).

  • Question: What is the composition of the Zila Parishad?

    Posted in: History | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Revenue district shall be the jurisdiction of Zilla Parishad (ZP). It was considered to be a coordinating unit, unlike Panchayat Samiti, in addition to performing supervisory functions. All the presidents of the Panchayat Samiti are the members of the Zilla Parishad, The members of legislative assembly representing the district are also the mem­bers of the parishad, including medical and health, agriculture, veterinary, engineering, education, backward classes welfare, public works and other development departments. The Chairman of the Zilla Parishad should be the District Collector and Magistrate, and one of the district officers will have to act as the Secretary of Zilla Parishad.

  • Answer:

    The Chief Minister is the leader of the Legislative Assembly of the State, As the chief spokesman of the State Government, he explains the government policies, He comes to the rescue of a minister if he faces any difficulty during the debates in the Assembly, He has to bear the responsibility of getting the important Bills passed, The Constitution virtually gives a preeminence to the leadership of the Chief Minister by placing him at the head of the Council of Ministers, The Chief Minister allocates or re-allocates the portfolios among the ministers, If there is any conflict of opinion between the Chief Minister and any other minister, the latter has to resign, If the Chief Minister resigns, the entire Council of Ministers is bound to resign. So, in case of necessity, he tries to keep the Council of Ministers under his control by brandishing the threat of resignation

  • Answer:

    The Chief Minister is the chief adviser to the Governor, Generally the Governor exercises all his functions on the advice of the Chief Minister, Besides, he has to act as the principal channel of communication between the Governor and the Council of Ministers, It is his duty to communicate to the Governor all decisions of the Council of Ministers, He has to furnish such information relating to the affairs of the State as the Governor may call for

  • Answer:

    (a) The main function of the Speaker is to preside over the meetings of the Legislative Assembly.

    (b) He maintains order and discipline during meetings. He maintains its decorum and dignity.

    (c) He interprets Rules of Business and enforces them.

    (d) He protects the rights of the MLAs and punishes those who breach the privilege of the House.

    (e) He appoints the Chairman and members of different Committees of the House.

    (f) He determines 'defection' under Anti-Defection Act, 1985.

    (g) He casts his vote in case of 'tie' (when the supporters and opponents of a resolution have equal votes).

  • Answer:

    Hirakud Dam

  • Answer:

    Durgapur Thermal Power Station

  • Answer:

    Gujarat

  • Answer:

    Inundation canal are long canals taken off from large rivers.They receive water when the river is high enough and especially when in flood. While Perennial canals are lined to dams and barrages to provide water throughout the year, and they irrigate a vast area

  • Question: Which important product is associated with Digboi?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Crude Oil, Petroleum Products

  • Question: What the statistical study of human population is called?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

     Demography is a social science which entails the statistical study of human populations

  • Question: What is the location and function of Tympanum?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Thats just another word for your eardrum!  The tympanic membrane (also tympanum or myrinx), is a thin membrane that separates the external ear from the middle ear. Its function is to transmit sound from the air to the ossicles inside the middle ear. The malleus bone bridges the gap between the eardrum and the other ossicles.

  • Question: In which state tank irrigation is very important?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Tank Irrigation in Peninsular India where Andhra Pradesh , Karnataka & Tamil Nadu are Important States

  • Question: On which river is the Farakka Project located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Ganga

  • Question: Which important product is associated with Raniganj?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Coal

  • Question: What is the effect of shivering?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Shivering is a safe guard for your body to defend against the cold , your muscles twitch quickly to create heat , which in turn helps keep your core warm

  • Question: What is the major problem of small-scale industry?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Major problems faced by the small scale industries are : (1) Finance (2) Raw Material (3) Idle Capacity (4) Technology (5) Marketing (6) Infrastructure (7) Under Utilisation of Capacity (8) Project Planning

  • Answer:

    The major problems of Indian Jute Industries are mentioned below: 1.High cost of production: Equipments for production are all worn out, outmoded in design. Many mills are uneconomic. Products are made costlier. 2.Storage of raw Jute: Jute industry suffers from inadequate supply of raw jute. Shortage of Power Supply: Load-shedding creates problem of under-utilization of capacity. 3.Growth of Jute mills in Bangladesh and loss of foreign market: Newly started jute industry in Bangladesh has captured some of the market of Indian jute goods. 4.Emergence of substitute goods against gunny bags and loss of demand for jute goods both at home and abroad: Indian jute goods have been losing ground in the world market primarily due to keen competition from synthetic substitutes and also supplies from Bangladesh and China.

  • Question: Which state is an important producer of groundnut?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu states are important producer's of groundnut

  • Question: Who is known as the father of pearl industry?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Kokichi Mikimoto

  • Answer:

    Methaemoglobinemia

    Methaemoglobinaemia caused by the decreased ability of blood to carry vital oxygen around the body. One of the most common causes is nitrate in drinking water. It is most important in bottle fed infants and water from wells in rural areas is of special concern. Controlling nitrate levels in drinking water sources to below around 50mg/litre is an effective preventive measure.

  • Question: Which states are leading producers of wheat in India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Major wheat growing states in India are Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Bihar and Gujarat

  • Question: What is 'crop rotation'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Crop rotation is the practice of growing a series of dissimilar or different types of crops in the same area in sequenced seasons. It helps in reducing soil erosion and increases soil fertility and crop yield, Crop rotation gives various nutrients to the soil. A traditional element of crop rotation is the replenishment of nitrogen through the use of green manure in sequence with cereals and other crops. Crop rotation also mitigates the build-up of pathogens and pests that often occurs when one species is continuously cropped, and can also improve soil structure and fertility by alternating deep-rooted and shallow-rooted plants. Crop rotation is one component of polyculture

  • Question: Why are capillaries thin walled?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    This layer is so thin that molecules such as oxygen, water and lipids can pass through them by diffusion and enter the tissues. Waste products such as carbon dioxide and urea can diffuse back into the blood to be carried away for removal from the body. Capillaries are so small the red blood cells need to partially fold into bullet-like shapes in order to pass through them in single file.

  • Question: Why is millet called a 'dry crop'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown around the world as cereal crops or grains for fodder and human food. Millets are important crops in the semiarid tropics of Asia and Africa (especially in India, Nigeria, and Niger), with 97% of millet production in developing countries.[1] The crop is favored due to its productivity and short growing season under dry, high-temperature conditions

  • Question: What is the symptom and cause of myopia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Short sightedness does not affect your close-up vision, but it does affect your ability to see objects further away properly.

    Symptoms of short sightedness

    If objects in the distance appear blurry, it could be a sign that you suffer from short sightedness. Close-up vision is generally unaffected in people with myopia. However, in very severe cases of short sightedness, close-up vision can also become blurry

    Causes of short sightedness

    Short sightedness is a refractive error caused by an imperfection in the eye. The imperfection changes the way your eye focuses the light rays that pass into it. This can happen when The eyeball is longer than normal and The cornea is more curved than normal

  • Question: What are the disadvantages of the red soil?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    The red soil is thin, poor, porous and has loose gravel and it is also poor in lime, phosphate, nitrogen and humus

  • Question: In which states of India the red soil is found?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    It is found in Indian states such as  Tamil Nadu, southern Karnataka, north-eastern Andhra Pradesh and some parts of Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Odisha.

  • Question: Which states receive rain in ]anuary-February?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Punjab and haryana

  • Answer:

    Kaiga Power station, Kakrapar Power station, Madras (Kalpakkam) Power station, Narora Power station, Rajasthan Power station, Tarapur Power station and Kudankulam Power station

  • Question: what is Bayer's reagent?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 19/01/2016

    Answer:

    Baeyer's reagent is an alkaline solution of cold potassium permanganate, which is a powerful oxidant making this a redox reaction. Reaction with double or triple bonds (-C=C- or -C≡C-) in an organic material causes the color to fade from purplish-pink to brown. It is a syn addition reaction. Aldehydes and formic acid (and formic acidesters) also give a positive test.

  • Question: Why Mumbai is warmer than Kanpur in December?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Mumbai is warmer than kanpur in december because mumbai is near the coastal region so the temperature becomes moderate.

  • Answer:

    In India, evergreen forests are found on the eastern and western slopes of the Western Ghats in such states as Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Kerala and Maharashtra. And also found in Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Tripura, West Bengal and Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

  • Question: Which place in India receives the heaviest rainfall?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    mawsynram (meghalaya).... previously it used to be chirapunji (meghalaya)

  • Question: What are the important features of the Indian Monsoon?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    (a) Rainfall is mainly Relief (Orographic). Most of the rainfall is caused due to the obstruction of moisture bearing winds by the mountain ranges. As a result, windward side gets heavy rain while the leeward side gets scanty rain.

    (b)Rainfall is erratic and unpredictable. The amount of rainfall varies from time to time, often resulting in floods and droughts. Sometimes the rainfall occurs early and at times it is delayed.

    (c)Rainfall occurs mainly in summer. A large part of the country receives rainfall mainly in the summer from the South West Monsoon winds. Very little rain is caused in winter from the N.E winter monsoons.

    (d)Rainfall is unevenly distributed. Some regions receive over 200 cms of rain and suffer from floods while others receive less than 50 cms annually and experience semi-desert conditions.

  • Question: What does the acronym SAARC stand far?

    Posted in: History | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation

  • Question: Through which openings on the stem, transpiration occurs?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    stomatal opening

  • Question: Which fluid is present inside and outside the brain?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Cerebrospinal fluid

  • Question: Where India's nuclear power plants are located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Kaiga Power station, Kakrapar Power station, Madras (Kalpakkam) Power station, Narora Power station, Rajasthan Power station, Tarapur Power station and Kudankulam Power station

  • Answer:

    The ureters are muscular tubes that transport urine from the kidneys tothe urinary bladder

  • Answer:

    The non-conventional sources of energy have many advantages. They are discussed below:

    1. Cheaper and Renewable: Most of the Non-conventional Power resources are cheaper and renewable as compared to the conventional sources.

    2.  Scarcity of Fossil Fuels: The overall limitation and scarcity of fossil fuels has given rise to the urgent need for exploiting alternative energy sources.

    3.  Rural Energy Needs: Locally available non-conventional and renewable power resources can meet localized rural energy needs with minimum transportional cost.

    4. Inexhaustible and Environment friendly: Power from Non-conventional and Renewable is a must in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of the coal-based power plants. It is inexhaustible in nature and environment friendly.

  • Question: What is the difference between a barrage and a dam?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    A barrage is a weir that has adjustable gates installed over top of it, to allow different water surface heights at different times. The water level is adjusted by operating the adjustable gates. A dam is a high impervious barrier constructed across a river valley to form a deep storage reservoir.

  • Question: What is meant by Satyagraha?

    Posted in: History | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Satyagraha loosely translated as "insistence on truth" (satya "truth"; agraha "insistence" or "holding firmly to") or holding onto truth or truth force, is a particular philosophy and practice within the broader overall category generally known as nonviolent resistance or civil resistance. The term satyagraha was coined and developed by Mahatma Gandhi. He deployed satyagraha in the Indian independence movement and also during his earlier struggles in South Africa for Indian rights. Satyagraha theory influenced Nelson Mandela's struggle in South Africa under apartheid, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s and James Bevel's campaigns during the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, and many other social justice and similar movements

  • Question: Why in summer urine is slightly thicker than in winter?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    In summer sweating takes place and water losses from our body so two maintain the water balance in the body only harmful nitrogenous waste removed from the body that's why urine is thick in summer.

  • Question: What is the structure and function of the mitochondria?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Mitochondria Structure

    A mitochondrion contains two main membranes composed of phosopholipid bilayers and proteins -

    The smooth outer membrane – This encloses the entire organelle and contains porin protein molecules that serve as diffusion channels for minute protein molecules across the membrane. Larger molecules can enter only if their signaling sequence can bind to a large translocase protein in the outer membrane.

    The folded inner membrane – This contains about 1/5th of the mitochondrion protein, but has no porin proteins, and includes several hundred polypeptides. The inner membrane is impermeable and ions and molecules require special membrane transporters to pass through it. The inner membrane folds are known as cristae.

    The cristae – With their folds, the cristae increase the total surface area of the inner membrane. The cristae create two sections in the mitochondrion -

    The intermembrane space – This lies between the outer and inner membranes.

    The matrix – This is the inner space enclosed by the inner member. The matrix contains about 2/3rd of the total mitochondrion protein. It also contains several hundred enzymes, transfer RNA (tRNA) and copies of the mitochondrial DNA genome.

    Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell. The function of the mitochondria is to provide the chemical energy necessary to carry out the various cellular activities. Defects in the mitochondria structure or in the gene organization in the mitochondria lead to ill health and disease.

  • Question: What is the scientific name of heeng?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    FERULA ASAFOETIDA

  • Question: Who was the first test tube baby? Where was she born?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Louise Joy Brown is best known as the world's first "test-tube baby." Her birth by Caesarian section shortly before midnight on July 25, 1978, at Oldham General Hospital in England

  • Question: When is anti tobacco day?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is observed around the world every year on May 31.

  • Question: Which drug is also known as brown sugar?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Heroin drug is also known as brown sugar

  • Question: Which antibody is the largest?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Immunoglobulin M, or IgM for short, is a basic antibody that is produced by B cells. IgM is by far the physically largest antibody in the human circulatory system. It is the first antibody to appear in response to initial exposure to an antigen.

  • Question: Which organism causes whooping cough?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Pertussis, a respiratory illness commonly known as whooping cough, is a very contagious disease caused by a type of bacteria called Bordetella pertussis. 

  • Question: Which organism causes herpes genitalis?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2), although it also can be caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), which normally causes cold sores around the mouth.

  • Question: Which disease is caused by balantidium coli?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Balantidium coli causes a disease called Balantidiasis

  • Question: What is chloropicrin?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Chloropicrin, also known as PS and nitrochloroform, is a chemical compound currently used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial, fungicide, herbicide, insecticide, and nematicide. Its chemical structural formula is Cl₃CNO₂

  • Question: What is rectified spirit?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Rectified spirit, also known as neutral spirits, rectified alcohol, or ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin is highly concentrated ethanol which has been purified by means of repeated distillation, a process that is called rectification

  • Question: What is gerontology?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Gerontology is the study of aging and older adults. The science of gerontology has evolved as longevity has improved. Researchers in this field are diverse and are trained in areas such as physiology, social science, psychology, public health, and policy.

  • Question: What is morphallaxis?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Morphallaxis is the regeneration of specific tissue in a variety of organisms due to loss or death of the existing tissue. The word comes from the Greek allazein, which means to exchange.

  • Question: Which was the first national park of the world?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Yellowstone National Park

  • Question: Where is kaziranga national park?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Assam

  • Question: Where is kanha national park?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

    Kanha Tiger Reserve, also called Kanha National Park, is one of the tiger reserves ofIndia and the largest national park of Madhya Pradesh state in India

  • Question: What is amniocentesis?

    Posted in: Zoology | Date: 20/01/2016

    Answer:

     Amniocentesis, also known as Amniotic Fluid Test is a test that detects chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus. A sample of amniotic fluid is taken from the amniotic sac (amnion) surrounding the unborn baby and its DNA is examined for genetic abnormalities.

  • Question: When was the term "Commonwealth" used for the first time?

    Posted in: History | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    "Commonwealth" was first proposed as a term for a federation of the six Australian crown colonies at the 1891 constitutional convention in Sydney.

  • Question: What are the effects of the Cold War?

    Posted in: History | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The Cold War had many effects on society, both today and in the past. In Russia, military spending was cut dramatically and quickly. The effects of this were very large, seeing as the military-industrial sector had previously employed one of every five Soviet adults and its dismantling left hundreds of millions throughout the former Soviet Union unemployed.

  • Question: What is the difference between myopia and hypermetropia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    hypermetropia is 'Long-sightedness', this is directly opposite to that of Myopia in that people who have Hyperopia can view objects that are in the distant clearly yet when viewing objects at a close distance, the objects are out of focus. this is because the light rays are focused behind the retina rather on the retina itself.The cause for hyperopia is usually because the eyeball is too short or the person possesses poor accommodation abilities in the lens and as such can not refract diverging light rays on the retina but behind retina causing the closer objects to become blurry. 

    Myopia is 'short-sightedness' in that a person who is myopic sees objects that are close clearly but when it comes to objects at a distance then the vision become blurry and is out of focus. The light rays from distance are essentially focussed in front and before the retina and hence the light rays are then diverged once again at the retina surface causing the person to be Myopic.The usual cause of Myopia is due to an elongated eyeball or the cornea has too much curvature, as a result the eye isn't focused correctly which results in distant objects being blurry

  • Question: What is the process of fusion of ovum and sperm?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Human fertilization

  • Answer:

    mahatma gandhi

  • Answer:

    Major wheat growing states in India are Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Bihar and Gujarat

  • Question: What is 'ginning'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Cotton Ginning is the process of separating the cotton fibers from the cotton seeds. 

  • Question: What is sulphonamides?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Sulfonamides (sulfa drugs) are drugs that are derived from sulfanilamide, a sulfur-containing chemical. Most sulfonamides are antibiotics, but some are prescribed for treating ulcerative colitis.

  • Question: What are the functions of Lymph?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    1. Lymph acts as a "middle man" which transports oxygen, food materials, hormones, etc., to the body cells and brings carbon dioxide and other metabolic wastes, from the body cells to blood and then finally pours the same into the venous system.

    2. Body cells are kept moist by the lymph.

    3. Lymph nodes produce lymphocytes. Lymph takes lymphocytes and antibodies from the lymph nodes to the blood.'

    4. It destroys the invading microorganisms and foreign particles in the lymph nodes.

    5. It absorbs and transports fat and fat soluble vitamins from the intestine. Lymph capillaries present in the intestinal villi are called lacteals which are associated with absorption and transportation of fat and fat soluble vitamins.

    6. It brings plasma portein macromolecules synthesized in the liver cells and hormones produced in the endocrine glands to the blood. These molecules cannot pass into the narrow blood capillaries but can diffuse into the lymphatic capillaries.

    7. Lymph maintains the volume of the blood, as soon as the volume of the blood reduces in the blood vascular system, the lymph rushes from the lymphatic systems to the blood vascular system.

  • Question: Which endocrine cells present in the Pancreas?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The islets are a compact collection of endocrine cells arranged in clusters and cords and are crisscrossed by a dense network of capillaries.

  • Question: Why is tea cultivated on hill slopes?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    a slope less than 15% is preferable. Steeper slopes present a major erosion risk and require terracing or special management such as contour furrows or preferably grass strips. A slight slope will improve air drainage and reduce damage from frost. Do not plant coffee at the bottom of a slope or in shallow dips where cold air can pool, as frost damage is more likely here. Usually it is best not to plant the bottom third of a slope as it will be colder and sometimes waterlogged.

  • Question: What is epiglottis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The epiglottis is a flap made of elastic cartilage tissue covered with a mucous membrane, attached to the entrance of the larynx. It projects obliquely upwards behind the tongue and the hyoid bone, pointing dorsally.

  • Question: What is Penicillin?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Penicillin V is an antibiotic in the penicillin group of drugs. It fights bacteria in your body. Penicillin V is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as ear infections,. Penicillin V may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

  • Question: Which vessel contains the highest concentration of urea?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Hepatic vein

  • Question: Is wheat a Rabi or Kharif crop?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Rabi Crop

  • Question: Which millet crops grown widely in India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The most widely grown millet is pearl millet, which is an important crop in India, Finger millet, proso millet, and foxtail millet are also important crop species.

  • Question: Why are millets called 'dry' crops?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown around the world as cereal crops or grains for fodder and human food. Millets are important crops in the semiarid tropics of Asia and Africa (especially in India, Nigeria, and Niger), with 97% of millet production in developing countries. The crop is favored due to its productivity and short growing season under dry, high-temperature conditions

  • Question: What is a Rabi crop?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Rabi crops or Rabi harvest are agriculturalcrops sown in winter and harvested in the spring in the South Asia. The term is derived from the Arabic word for "spring", which is used in the Indian subcontinent, where it is the spring harvest (also known as the "wintercrop").

  • Question: What is 'oil cake'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    A press cake or oil cake is the solids remaining after pressing something to extract the liquids. Their most common use is in animal feed.

    Some foods whose processing creates press cakes are olives for olive oil (pomace), peanuts for peanut oil, coconut flesh for coconut cream and milk (sapal), grapes for wine (pomace), apples for cider (pomace), and soybeans for soy milk (used to make tofu) (this is called okara) or oil. Other common press cakes come from flax seed (linseed), cottonseed, and sunflower seeds. However, some specific kinds may be toxic, and are rather used as fertilizer, for example cottonseed contains a toxic pigment, gossypol, that must be removed before processing.

  • Answer:

    Maharashtra

  • Question: What is placenta in mammals?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Placenta helps to transport nutrients from maternal blood into foetus.

  • Question: What is Medulla Oblongata?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The medulla oblongata (or medulla) is located in the hindbrain, anterior to the cerebellum. The medulla oblongata is a cone-shaped neuronal mass responsible for multiple autonomic (involuntary) functions ranging from vomiting to sneezing. The medulla contains the cardiac, respiratory, vomiting and vasomotor centers and therefore deals with the autonomic functions ofbreathing, heart rate and blood pressure

  • Answer:

    Rourkela Steel Plant (RSP) in Odisha set up with German collaboration, Bhilai Steel Plant (BSP) in Chhattisgarh set up with Soviet collaboration (1959), Durgapur Steel Plant (DSP) at Durgapur, West Bengal set up with British collaboration (1965), Bokaro Steel Plant (BSL) in Jharkhand (1965) set up with Soviet collaboration 

  • Question: Which state leads in the cultivation of Jowar?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Maharashtra

  • Answer:

    The RBC mainly functions as a carrier of respiratory gasses, The main function WBC is fighting disease and developing immunity.

  • Question: What is meant by 'reflex action'?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    When a receptor is stimulated, it sends a signal to the central nervous system, where the brain co-ordinates the response. But sometimes a very quick response is needed, one that does not need the involvement of the brain. This is a reflex action.

  • Question: When the Kharif crops are sown & harvested?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Kharif crops are usually sown with the beginning of the first rains in July, during the south-west monsoon season starts on 16 April and lasts until 15 October. In India, the kharif season varies by crop and state, with kharif starting at the earliest in May and ending at the latest in January, but is popularly considered to start in June and to end in October. 

  • Question: What is meant by air pollution?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Air pollution is the introduction of particulates, biological molecules, or other harmful materials into Earth's atmosphere, causing diseases, death to humans, damage to other living organisms such as animals and food crops, or the natural or built environment.

  • Question: What the wall of the heart is made up of?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    The wall of the heart consists of three layers: the epicardium (external layer), the myocardium (middle layer) and the endocardium (inner layer). The epicardium is the thin, transparent outer layer of the wall and iscomposed of delicate connective tissue.

  • Question: Which cells of the retina are sensitive to colour?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

     Cone cells, or cones, are one of two types of photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye. They are responsible for color vision and function best in relatively bright light, as opposed to rod cells, which work better in dim light.

  • Question: What are 'Western Disturbances'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Western Disturbance occurs in India, Pakistan and Nepal to describe an extratropical storm originating in the Mediterranean, that brings sudden winter rain and to the northwestern parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is a non-monsoonal precipitation pattern driven by the Westerlies.

  • Answer:

    the latitudinal extent of india is 8degree4'north to 37degree6'north  the longitudinal extent of india is 68degree7'east to 97degree25'east

  • Question: What is Flaccidity?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    flaccidity is when the cell loses water. these cells are easy to distinguish under a microscope because the cell membrane and contents pull away from the cell wall

  • Question: What is Turgor Pressure?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Turgor pressure pushes the plasma membrane against the cell wall of plant, bacteria, and fungi cells as well as those protist cells which have cell walls.

    This pressure, turgidity or turgidness, is caused by the osmotic flow of water from an area of low solute concentration outside the cell into the cell's vacuole, which has a higher solute concentration. Healthy plant cells are turgid and plants rely on turgidity to maintain rigidity. In contrast, this phenomenon is not observed in animal cells which have no cell walls to prevent them from being burst by the flow of water into the cell and must either continually pump out water, with a contractile vacuole, or live in an isotonic solution where there is no osmotic pressure.

  • Question: What is the difference between Hormone and Enzyme?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Enzymes are the biological catalyst which speed up the rate of biochemical reactions without undergoing any changes.

    Hormones are molecules, usually a peptide (eg: insulin) or steroid (eg: estrogen) that is produced in one part of an organisms and triggers a specific cellular reactions in target tissues and organs some distance away.

  • Question: What are the disadvantages of tank irrigation?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    1. Tanks use up large areas of land which could be used for agriculture.

    2. They dry up in summer and are not of much use.

    3. A lot of water evaporates as they are very shallow.

    4. It is difficult to carry water to the fields due to rocky terrain.

  • Question: What are the advantages of bio-gas plants?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    1. Renewable Source of Energy: To begin with, biogas is considered to be a renewable source of energy. Since it often produced from materials that form sewage and waste products, the only time it will be depleted is when we stop producing any waste. 2. Non-Polluting: It is also considered to be non-polluting in nature. The production of biogas does not require oxygen, which means that resources are conserved by not using any further fuel. 3. Reduces Landfills: It also uses up waste material found in landfills, dump sites and even farms across the country, allowing for decreased soil and water pollution. 4. Cheaper Technology: Applications for biogas are increasing as the technology to utilize it gets better. It can be used to produce electricity and for the purpose of heating as well. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is biogas that has been compressed and can be used as a fuel for vehicles. Production can be carried out through many small plants or one large plant. 5. Large number of Jobs: Either way, work opportunities are created for thousands of people in these plants. These jobs are a blessing in rural areas, which are the targeted grounds for the use of biogas. In fact, biogas can easily be decentralized, making it easier to access by those living in remote areas or facing frequent power outages. 6. Little Capital Investment: Biogas are easy to set up and require little capital investment on a small scale basis. In fact, many farms can become self sufficient by utilizing biogas plants and the waste material produced by their livestock each day. A single cow can provide enough waste material within a day to power a light bulb the entire day. 7. Reduces Greenhouse Effect: It also reduces the greenhouse effect by utilizing the gases being produced in landfills as forms of energy. This is a major reason why the use of biogas has started catching on. It recycles most forms of biodegradable waste and works on simple forms of technology.

  • Question: What is meant by an 'inundation canal'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    inundated canals are long canals taken off from large rivers and it receive water when the river is high enough and especially when it is in flood .

  • Question: What is meant by the term "Oil-cake"?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    A press cake or oil cake is the solids remaining after pressing something to extract the liquids. Their most common use is in animal feed.

    Some foods whose processing creates press cakes are olives for olive oil (pomace), peanuts for peanut oil, coconut flesh for coconut cream and milk (sapal), grapes for wine (pomace), apples for cider (pomace), and soybeans for soy milk (used to make tofu) (this is called okara) or oil. Other common press cakes come from flax seed (linseed), cottonseed, and sunflower seeds. However, some specific kinds may be toxic, and are rather used as fertilizer, for example cottonseed contains a toxic pigment, gossypol, that must be removed before processing.

  • Question: Which State in India is the largest producer of coffee?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Karnataka

  • Question: Give an example of a transgenic plant?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Bt corn varieties

  • Question: What is the percentage of alcohol in brandy?

    Posted in: Botany | Date: 21/01/2016

    Answer:

    Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn, "gebrande wijn" "burned wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink.

  • Question: Which fluid is surrounding the developing embryo?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Amniotic fluid

  • Question: Which gland has both endocrine and exocrine functions?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    The pancreas is a dual-function gland, having features of both endocrine and exocrine glands

  • Question: What is UNESCO stands for?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

  • Question: What is the expanded form of SAPTA?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    South Asian Preferential Trade Arrangement

  • Question: What is meant by topping?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    a ​substance, ​especially a ​sauce or ​pieces of ​food, that is put on ​top of other ​food to give ​extra ​flavour and to make it ​look​ attractive

  • Question: Which organ produces urea?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    liver

  • Answer:

    Maharashtra and Karnataka

  • Question: What were the aims of the United Nations Organisation?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    The aims of the un are-  1.to promote world peace  2.to protect human rights  3.to help developing countries by funding  4.to promote better relations between countries  5.to promote social,economic and cultural development  6.to facilitate international law  7.to facilitate international security 

  • Question: When and by whom was the Ramkrishna Mission founded?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Swamy Vivekananda founded the Ramakrishna Mission on 1st May, 1897

  • Question: What is the liquid part of blood without corpuscles?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Plasma

  • Question: In which State is Hirakud Project located?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Odisha

  • Question: What is the normal term of the Lok Sabha?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    5 Years

  • Question: What is the protective covering of lungs?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

     mulberry silk is produced mainly in the states of Karnataka,Andhra Pradesh & Tamil Nadu

  • Question: Which state is famous for Mulberry Silk?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

     mulberry silk is produced mainly in the states of Karnataka,Andhra Pradesh & Tamil Nadu

  • Question: Which state is famous for coir industry?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Kerala

  • Question: What is the full form of OPEC?

    Posted in: History | Date: 25/01/2016

    Answer:

    Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries

  • Question: Which is more acidic? Water or. Alcohol?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    alcohols have methyl groups, ethyl groups ect... attached to the alcohol. Carbon and its hydrogens are considerd electron donating groups (because they are not electronegative like F, O or N); therefore they donate part of their electric charge toward the oxygen on the alcohol making that oxygen less able to distribute the electron from the lost hydrogen. Meanwhile, water can lose a hydrogen and does not contain any electron donating groups (such as Carbon) and the oxygen is better suited to distribute the extra electrons from the lost hydrogen. think about it... if carbon is donating part of its electrons to oxygen in an alcohol, there is less room for that oxygen to take on the electrons from a lost hydrogen vs water.

  • Question: What is SI unit of temperature?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Kelvin is the SI unit of temperature

  • Question: What is the Big Bang Theory?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    The Big Bang Theory is the leading explanation about how the universe began. At its simplest, it talks about the universe as we know it starting with a small singularity, then inflating over the next 13.8 billion years to the cosmos that we know today.

    Because current instruments don't allow astronomers to peer back at the universe's birth, much of what we understand about the Big Bang Theory comes from mathematical theory and models. Astronomers can, however, see the "echo" of the expansion through a phenomenon known as the cosmic microwave background

  • Question: What are the two types of latent heat?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Two common forms of latent heat are latent heat of fusion (melting) and latent heat of vaporization (boiling).

  • Question: What is a chromosome?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Chromosomes are bundles of tightly coiled DNA located within the nucleus of almost every cell in our body. Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes.

  • Question: What is the full form of CNG?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    CNG is Compressed Natural Gas

  • Question: What is the full form of LPG?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Liquefied Petroleum Gas

  • Question: What is the melting point of ice?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    The melting point of ice is the same as freezing point of water that is, zero Deg. C (OR) 273 K

  • Question: Which is the Southern most point of our country?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    The southernmost point of India is the Indira Point (formerly known as Pygmalion Point and for a brief period of time as India Point) is situated on the island of Great Nicobar in the Nicobar Islands, eastern Indian Ocean. The point is located in the Union Territory of Andaman and Nicobar Islands and is named in honour of Indira Gandhi.

  • Question: What is the full form of GMO?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Genetically Modified Organism

  • Question: Which is the most popular continent?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Asia

  • Answer:

    Australia

  • Question: What is meant by change in state?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    A change of state is a change in the object from a solid to liquid or from a solid to gas or from liquid to solid. ice changing into water is an example of a change in state

  • Question: Why do gases diffuse rapidly?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    The energy in gas molecules is very high compared to liquids and solids. As these particles have high energy and a lot of space in which to move, they diffuse comparitively quickly.

  • Question: What is meant by the term 'fuel'?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Fuel is the source of energy that makes an engine or machine function. Gasoline is the fuel used in most automobiles. The wind is the fuel for wind-turbine generators, and for sailing vessels. Uranium is the fuel for atomic powered submarines.

  • Question: What is sublimation?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/03/2016

    Answer:

    Sublimation is the transition from the solid phase to the gasphase without passing through an intermediate liquid phase. This endothermic phase transition occurs at temperatures and pressures below the triple point.

  • Question: What is meant by corrosion of iron?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    The corrosion of iron is more commonly known as rusting. Rusting occurs when oxygen combines chemically with objects made of iron (i.e. fences, cars, etc.). For this, rusting is also refereed to as an oxidation reaction. In terms of a chemical reaction, rusting occurs as follows: 2 Fe(s) + (3/2) O2(g) --> Fe2O3(s).

  • Question: What is osmoregulation?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Osmoregulation means the physiological processes that an organism uses to maintain water balance; that is, to compensate for water loss, avoid excess water gain, and maintain the proper osmotic concentration (osmolarity) of the body fluids. Most humans are about 55 to 60 percent water by weight (45 percent in elderly and obese people and up to 75 percent in newborn infants). Many jellyfish are 95 percent or more water.

  • Question: What is WAN?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    WAN = Wide Area Network, it means a computer network that covers a large area. The largest and most well known example of a WAN is the Internet.

  • Question: Which is most fertile region of India ?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain, also known as Indus-Ganga and the North Indian River Plain

  • Question: What is the function of epiglottis in man?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Epiglottis Function: Although it's very small, the epiglottis serves a critical role in human survival. The esophagus and larynx (or voice box) are situated next to each other in the throat, but have very different purposes. The esophagus delivers food to the lower digestive system whereas the larynx is the passageway for air to enter the lungs. To prevent food or drink from getting into the lungs, the epiglottis moves to cover the larynx when swallowing. This movement is accomplished by muscles reacting to contact with food or drink.

  • Question: What is 'nerve impulse'?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    A nerve impulse is also known as an action potential. It is a wave of depolarization and repolarization that travels along a nerve's axon, nerve impulse is the electrical discharge that travels along a nerve fiber; "they demonstrated the transmission of impulses from the cortex to the hypothalamus" also The signals that nerves carry, sometimes called nerve impulses

  • Question: What are the main constituents of the bronze?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Bronze is a general term describing alloys of copper, the most common type of Bronze today is an alloy of copper and tin (often lead or other materials are added too to improve quality). 

  • Question: What is a polymer?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    A polymer is chemical compound where molecules are bonded together in long repeating chains. These materials, polymers, have unique properties and can be tailored depending on their intended purpose.

  • Question: How are metalloids different from metals?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Metalloids have properties in between those of the metals and non-metals and are semiconductors (whereas metals are conductors and nonmetals are not conductors) and used extensively in circuitry (like computer chips). They are all solids at room temperature, not quite as malleable as metals....but not quite as brittle as nonmetals. They can be shiny (have luster) or not whereas all metal are shiny.

  • Question: What is menopause?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    The word "menopause" means the "end of monthly cycles" a Greek word pausis (cessation) and the root men- (month), because the word "menopause" was created to describe this change in human females, where the end of fertility is traditionally indicated by the permanent stopping of monthly menstruation or menses. Natural menopause occurs when the ovaries naturally begin decreasing their production of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. Menopause is not a disease that needs to be cured, but a natural life-stage transition.

  • Question: Why metals conduct electricity?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Metals undergo a metallic bonding, meaning when two metals shares their valence electron they undergo metallic bonding. Within the metallic bond, there are enormous amount of free electrons or what we call " SEA OF ELECTRONS, MOBILISE NOT STATIONARY"constantly moving within the lattice. As we know electrons can carry electric and thermal energy through vibrations and pass the energy from each other throughout the lattice or structure. if u put a piece of metal under the sun light, eventually it will get hot and that's because electrons absorb the thermal energy from sun light and gets excited, the same way " when a guy see a hot girls" and starts vibrating.

  • Question: What is 'astigmatism'?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Astigmatism is a common eye condition that's easily corrected by eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. Astigmatism is characterized by an irregular curvature of the cornea. This type of disorder is also known as a refractive error. Astigmatism occurs in nearly everybody to some degree. For significant curvature, treatment is required.

  • Question: What is the major fuel component of biogas?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Methane

  • Question: What is the latitudinal extent of India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    The latitudinal extent of India from 8°4'N to 37°6'N

  • Question: What is a genetic disorder?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    A genetic disorder is a genetic problem caused by one or more abnormalities in the genome, especially a condition that is present from birth (congenital). Most genetic disorders are quite rare and affect one person in every several thousands or millions, Genetic disorders may or may not be heritable, i.e., passed down from the parents' genes. In non-heritable genetic disorders, defects may be caused by new mutations or changes to the DNA. In such cases, the defect will only be heritable if it occurs in the germ line. The same disease, such as some forms of cancer, may be caused by an inherited genetic condition in some people, by new mutations in other people, and mainly by environmental causes in still other people. Whether, when and to what extent a person with the genetic defect or abnormality will actually suffer from the disease is almost always affected by the environmental factors and events in the person's development.

  • Question: What are enantiomers?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Enantiomers are organic compounds in which a carbon atom, known as a chiral carbon, is bonded to four distinct and non-identical alkyl or functional groups (for example, a hydroxyl, a methyl, an ethyl and an amine). This means they can be arranged in two different ways; from the perspective of one of the groups, the other three can either be in one order - "clockwise" - or the opposite - "anticlockwise". 

  • Question: What are polymers?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Polymers are substances containing a large number of structural units joined by the same type of linkage. These substances often form into a chain-like structure. Polymers in the natural world have been around since the beginning of time. Starch, cellulose, and rubber all possess polymeric properties. Man-made polymers have been studied since 1832.

  • Question: What is emphysema?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    Emphysema is in the COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) family. It is a disease caused by smoking that leads to the destruction of the elastic recoil/elasticity of the lungs

  • Question: What is synapse?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 30/03/2016

    Answer:

    A synapse is a small gap at the end of a neuron that allows a signal to pass from one neuron to the next. Synapses are found where nerve cells connect with other nerve cells. 

  • Question: What are the main constituents of the bronze?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 31/05/2016

    Answer:

    copper, commonly with about 12% tin

  • Question: Who wrote Macbeth ?

    Posted in: English | Date: 18/07/2016

    Answer:

    Macbeth is a play by William Shakespeare

  • Question: What is the capital of Cameroon ?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 18/07/2016

    Answer:

    Yaoundé is the capital of Cameroon

  • Answer:

    That Earth's water originated purely from comets is implausible, since a result of measurements of the isotope ratios of deuterium to protium (D/H ratio) in the four comets Halley, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, and 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, by researchers such as David Jewitt, is approximately double that of oceanic water

  • Question: What are the advantages and limitations of solar cookers?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 19/08/2016

    Answer:

    Advantages of a solar cooker : 

    (1) There is no cost of fuel. 

    (2) It is environment friendly and there is no residue like ash etc. 

    (3) Cooking is hygienic and nutritious. 

    Disadvantages of a solar cooker : 

    (1) The cooking is slow. 

    (2) It connot be used at all times. 

    (3) A solar cooker can perform only limited functions. 

    (4) Solar cookers have limited utility at the places where sunlight is less as in polar regions or where there are too much rains. 

  • Answer:

    A-Dhaka

  • Answer:

    E-None of These - 2nd Position

  • Answer:

    E- None of these

  • Answer:

    B - Economics

  • Answer:

    A - 22:31

  • Answer:

    D - Public

  • Answer:

    C - SEARCH - 214673

  • Answer:

    C - EDRIRL

  • Answer:

    Wrong Number in the sequence is 29

  • Answer:

    20

  • Answer:

    SPOKES

  • Answer:

    GOODS

  • Answer:

    LINE

  • Answer:

    A - 50 Days

  • Answer:

    Option D

  • Answer:

    Option C

  • Answer:

    Option E

  • Answer:

    Option C

  • Answer:

    B - LactoBacillus

  • Answer:

    SPOKES

  • Question: The minimum time required to hear an echo is

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 12/02/2019

    Answer:

    0.1Sec

  • Question: What is meant by ‘LASER’?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 12/02/2019

    Answer:

    A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term "laser" originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation"

  • Question: What is the full form of CNG?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    CNG means Compressed Natural Gas.

  • Question: Which instrument is used to measure sound under water ?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Hydrophone

  • Question: The most fertile plain in the world

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    The northern plains of india are considered one of the world's most fertile due to the following reasons : ● Most of the peninsular rivers flow through it giving abundance of water for cultivation. ● Also the rivers which bring fresh and fertile soils from the himalayas leave it near the plains making it extremely fertile.

  • Question: What are the features of Indian agriculture?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    8 Main Features of Indian Agriculture Source of livelihood Dependence on monsoon Labour intensive cultivation Under employment Small size of holdings Traditional methods of production Low Agricultural production Dominance of food crops

  • Question: We get ‐----from silkworm.

    Posted in: EVS | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Silk

  • Question: What are the 2 sources of fresh water?

    Posted in: Geography,Geography | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    There are many sources of fresh water on earth. Sources of fresh water are ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, and even underground water called groundwater and rain water also

  • Question: Who invented abacus?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Tim Cranmer

  • Answer:

    INIFD Deccan

  • Answer:

    Hamstech College of Creative Education

  • Answer:

    INIFD- Inter National Institute of Fashion Designing, Lindsay Street

  • Answer:

    International Academy for Certification and Training (IACT) Mumbai

  • Answer:

    International Academy for Certification and Training (IACT) Thyagaraya Nagar, Chennai

  • Question: Where is apical meristem found?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Apical meristem is found at the apices, or tips of the plant, both the tip of the shoot and the root, and is a region of actively dividing cells

  • Question: What is osmotic pressure?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    The pressure that would have to be applied to a pure solvent to prevent it from passing into a given solution by osmosis, often used to express the concentration of the solution

  • Question: Name the two devices working on archimedes prinicple.

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    lactometer, saccharometer

  • Answer:

    Italy, Germany and Japan

  • Question: Which Battle sealed the fate of France in 1815?

    Posted in: History | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Battle of Waterloo

  • Answer:

    Option C (2^3-2=6)

  • Question: Two parallel wires carrying in opposite directions:

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    Option B

  • Answer:

    Option B

  • Question: What are the three sub ranges of the himachal mountains

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 20/11/2019

    Answer:

    The following are the three main divisions of Himalayas running from North to South :

    (1) Himadri : It is the northern most range of the Himalayan mountains. It contains most of the highest peaks like Mt Everest, Kanchenjunga etc.

    (2) The Himachal : It is also known as lesser Himalayas. This range lies in the south of Himadri .Almost all the hill stations like Manali ,Shimla, Nainital are located in this region.

    (3) The Shiwalik : This is the outermost range of the himalayas .These ranges are made up of sediments which isbrought down by the rivers flowing from the northern Himalayan ranges .The valleys which separate the lesser Himalaya and shiwalik is known as duns like dehra dun, kotli fun, patli dun

    Read more on Brainly.in - https://brainly.in/question/9155112#readmore

  • Answer:

    the d subshell has 5 orbitals that hold up to 10 electrons

  • Question: Do plasmids replicate?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Every plasmid has its own 'origin of replication' – a stretch of DNA that ensures it gets replicated (copied) by the host bacterium

  • Question: Who is the father of the computer?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Charles Babbage

  • Question: why is battle of plassy important in The history of india

    Posted in: History | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Battle of Plassey was a major battle that took place on 23 June 1757 at Palashi, Bengal. It was an important British East India Company victory over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies. It let the British East India Company take control of this part of the Indian subcontinent.

  • Question: why is battle of plassy important in The history of india

    Posted in: History | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Battle of Plassey was a major battle that took place on 23 June 1757 at Palashi, Bengal. It was an important British East India Company victory over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies. It let the British East India Company take control of this part of the Indian subcontinent.

  • Question: Define harvesting.

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Harvesting is the process of gathering a ripe crop from the fields. Reaping is the cutting of grain or pulse for harvest, typically using a scythe, sickle, or reaper. On smaller farms with minimal mechanization, harvesting is the most labor-intensive activity of the growing season.

  • Question: What is Biology?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical processes, molecular interactions, physiological mechanisms, development and evolution.

  • Question: What is Dihybrid cross?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Dihybrid cross is a cross between two different lines/genes that differ in two observed traits. According to Mendel's statement, between the alleles of both these loci there is a relationship of completely dominant - recessive traits

  • Question: What is leaf venation?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Venation is the pattern of veins in the blade of a leaf. The veins consist of vascular tissues which are important for the transport of food and water. Leaf veins connect the blade to the petiole, and lead from the petiole to the stem

  • Question: 23+x = 345, find the value of x.

    Posted in: Mathematics | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    23+x=345

    x=345-23=322

  • Question: State the Name of Ores of aluminum.

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    The ores of Aluminium are Bauxite, Corundum, Felspaar, Cryolite, Alunite and Kaolin

  • Question: Who is called "Nana Saheb of Bengal"?

    Posted in: History | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Ramratan Mallick

  • Answer:

    Option B - Operating system

  • Question: Define 1N force

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    One newton is equal to 1 kilogram meter per second squared. In plain English, 1 newton of force is the forcerequired to accelerate an object with a mass of 1 kilogram 1 meter per second per second.

  • Answer:

    Rivers of South India are dependent on the monsoons and shrink during the dry season

  • Question: Name the central cavity in coelentrata

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Central cavity is called coelenteron or gastrovascular cavity

  • Question: What is mutation?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    A mutation is a change that occurs in our DNA sequence, either due to mistakes when the DNA is copied or as the result of environmental factors such as UV light and cigarette smoke

  • Question: What is Endoplasmic reticulum?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in biology, a continuous membrane system that forms a series of flattened sacs within the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and serves multiple functions, being important particularly in the synthesis, folding, modification, and transport of proteins . All eukaryotic cells contain an endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In animal cells, the ER usually constitutes more than half of the membranous content of the cell.

  • Question: What is plasmolysis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Plasmolysis is the process in which cells lose water in a hypertonic solution. The reverse process, deplasmolysis or cytolysis, can occur if the cell is in a hypotonic solution resulting in a lower external osmotic pressure and a net flow of water into the cell. Through observation of plasmolysis and deplasmolysis, it is possible to determine the tonicity of the cell's environment as well as the rate solute molecules cross the cellular membrane

  • Question: What is tha difference between force and load?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    force is the dynamic load { force= mass× acceleration} and it can act in any direction. load is a static load { F= mg} and it can act only in downward direction.

  • Question: What is mesosome in a prokaryotic cell?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Mesosome is a convoluted membranous structure formed in a prokaryotic cell by the invagination of the plasma membrane. Its functions are as follows: (1) These extensions help in the synthesis of the cell wall and replication of DNA. They also help in the equal distribution of chromosomes into the daughter cells. (2) It also increases the surface area of the plasma membrane to carry out various enzymatic activities. (3) It helps in secretion processes as well as in bacterial respiration.

  • Question: What is taxonomic key?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    A taxonomic key is a simple tool used to identify a specific object. A taxonomic key is one of the most useful tools available to scientists trying to identify an unknown organism. Systematists rely on keys to help identify known organisms and determine whether they have discovered a new organism entirely. Taxonomic keys are useful tools guiding researchers towards the known name of an organism. However, all taxonomic keys are not created equally. They are often created on a regional level or for a particular group of organisms (i.e., Plants of the Great Lakes Region, Argentinean Monocots etc.). So it is important to pick a key that represents the diversity of the region or group of organisms you are interested in examining

  • Question: What is mosaic vision?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Mosaic vision form in bright light.Ommatidia (compound eyes of insects are made up of small units called ommatidia;in case of cockroach,it is 2000) fully covered by pigmented membrane. The light rays reflected from an object enter into a number of ommatidia.Only straight light rays enters into an ommatidium and reaches into its receptor region and form the image of corresponding part of the object, while cross light rays get absorbed.Thus several images (pieces) of an object are received and assembled by brain, thus whole object becomes visible.

  • Question: What is stroke volume?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    In cardiovascular physiology, stroke volume (SV) is the volume of blood pumped from the left ventricle per beat. Stroke volume is calculated using measurements of ventricle volumes from an echocardiogram and subtracting the volume of the blood in the ventricle at the end of a beat (called end-systolic volume) from the volume of blood just prior to the beat (called end-diastolic volume). The term stroke volume can apply to each of the two ventricles of the heart, although it usually refers to the left ventricle. The stroke volumes for each ventricle are generally equal, both being approximately 70 mL in a healthy 70-kg man.

  • Question: What is etiolation?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Etiolation is a process in flowering plants grown in partial or complete absence of light. It is characterized by long, weak stems; smaller leaves due to longer internodes; and a pale yellow color (chlorosis). The development of seedlings in the dark is known as "skotomorphogenesis" and leads to etiolated seedlings

  • Answer:

    Amphibians are those organisms which live on both land and in water. Bryophytes are called amphibians of the plant kingdom because these plants though live in soil but they need water for sexual reproduction. The sperm of bryophyte (antherozoids) are flagellate and need water to swim to the eggs. In other words, as these plants need water for reproduction unlike other plants, they are called as amphibians

  • Answer:

    Placentation refers to the arrangement of ovules inside the ovary. It is of five basic types. (A) Marginal placentation - The ovary in which the placenta forms a ridge along the ventral suture of the ovary and the ovules develop on two separate rows is known to have marginal placentation. This type of placentation is found in peas. (B) Parietal placentation - When the ovules develop on the inner walls of the ovary, the ovary is said to have parietal placentation. (C) Axile placentation - In axile placentation, the placenta is axial and ovules are attached to it. Examples include China rose, lemon, and tomato. (D) Basal placentation - The ovary in which the placenta develops from its base and a single ovule is found attached to the base is said to have basal placentation. It is found in marigold and sunflower. (E) Free central placentation - In free central placentation, the ovules develop on the central axis while the septa are absent. This type of placentation is found inDianthus and primrose.

  • Question: What is an amalgam?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    An amalgam is an alloy of mercury with another metal. It may be a liquid, a soft paste or a solid, depending upon the proportion of mercury. These alloys are formed through metallic bonding, with the electrostatic attractive force of the conduction electrons working to bind all the positively charged metal ions together into a crystal lattice structure. Almost all metals can form amalgams with mercury, the notable exceptions being iron, platinum, tungsten, and tantalum. Silver-mercury amalgams are important in dentistry, and gold-mercury amalgam is used in the extraction of gold from ore. Dentistry has used alloys of mercury with metals such as silver, copper, indium, tin and zinc.

  • Question: What are ovoviviparous animals?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Ovoviviparous animals produce eggs, The eggs develop and hatch within the female's body. . Ovoviviparous animals include snakes, and insects, some sharks and other fish, including all Rays

  • Question: What are androgens?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    An androgen is any natural or synthetic steroid hormone that regulates the development and maintenance of male characteristics in vertebrates by binding to androgen receptors. This includes the embryological development of the primary male sex organs, and the development of male secondary sex characteristics at puberty. Androgens are synthesized in the testes, the ovaries, and the adrenal glands.

  • Question: What is autecology and synecology?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Autecology & Synecology are two main branches of ecology. Autecology is the study of individual organism or individual species. It is also known as population ecology. Synecology is the study of group of organisms of different species which are associated together as a unit in form of a community. Autecology helps us to understand the relationships between individual plants and environment. Synecology helps us to understand the relationships between communities and environment.

  • Question: What is pleiotropy?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Pleiotropy occurs when one gene influences two or more seemingly unrelated phenotypic traits. Such a gene that exhibits multiple phenotypic expression is called a pleiotropic gene. Mutation in a pleiotropic gene may have an effect on several traits simultaneously, due to the gene coding for a product used by a myriad of cells or different targets that have the same signalling function

  • Answer:

    Option A

  • Question: Which organ of the body produces bile?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Liver

  • Question: Which gland controls the blood pressure?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Adrenal Gland

  • Question: What is the weight of a human heart?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    According to the specialist, the average weight of a female human heart is 9 ounces (approximately 255gm) and a male's heart is 10.5 ounces (approximately 300gm).

  • Question: What is follicle atresia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Follicular atresia is the breakdown of the ovarian follicles, which consist of an oocyte surrounded by granulosa cells and internal and external theca cells. It occurs continually throughout a woman's life, as she is born with millions of follicles but will only ovulate around 400 times in her lifetime. Typically around 20 follicles mature each month but only a single follicle is ovulated; the follicle from which the oocyte was released becomes the corpus luteum. The rest undergo follicular atresia

  • Question: What is follicle atresia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Follicular atresia is the breakdown of the ovarian follicles, which consist of an oocyte surrounded by granulosa cells and internal and external theca cells. It occurs continually throughout a woman's life, as she is born with millions of follicles but will only ovulate around 400 times in her lifetime. Typically around 20 follicles mature each month but only a single follicle is ovulated; the follicle from which the oocyte was released becomes the corpus luteum. The rest undergo follicular atresia

  • Question: What is serology?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Serology is the scientific study of serum and other bodily fluids. In practice, the term usually refers to the diagnostic identification of antibodies in the serum. Such antibodies are typically formed in response to an infection (against a given microorganism), against other foreign proteins (in response, for example, to a mismatched blood transfusion), or to one's own proteins (in instances of autoimmune disease).

  • Question: What do you mean by activation energy?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 21/11/2019

    Answer:

    Activation energy, in chemistry, the minimum amount of energy that is required to activate atoms or molecules to a condition in which they can undergo chemical transformation or physical transport. In transition-state theory, the activation energy is the difference in energy content between atoms or molecules in an activated or transition-state configuration and the corresponding atoms and molecules in their initial configuration. The activation energy is usually represented by the symbol Ea

  • Question: Is external memory unit a component of computer?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Yes, It is also one of the component of computer

  • Answer:

    A LAN (local area network) is a group of computers and network devices connected together, usually within the same building. By definition, the connections must be high speed and relatively inexpensive (e.g., token ring or Ethernet). Most Indiana University Bloomington departments are on LANs

    A WAN (wide area network), in comparison to a MAN, is not restricted to a geographical location, although it might be confined within the bounds of a state or country. A WAN connects several LANs, and may be limited to an enterprise (a corporation or an organization) or accessible to the public. The technology is high speed and relatively expensive. The Internet is an example of a worldwide public WAN

  • Answer:

    Word has two typing modes: Insert and Overtype. Insert mode (the default) lets you insert text as you type. This means that you can position your insertion point anywhere inside a block of text and begin typing, and the new text will be inserted before the existing text. Use Overtype mode to type over existing text.

  • Question: What is meant by ‘LASER’?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term "laser" originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation".

  • Question: What is Ram and rom

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Random Access Memory (RAM) – It is also called as read write memory or the main memory or the primary memory, the programs and data that the CPU requires during execution of a program are stored in this memory, it is a volatile memory as the data loses when the power is turned off.

    Read Only Memory (ROM) – Stores crucial information essential to operate the system, like the program essential to boot the computer, it is not volatile, always retains its data, used in embedded systems or where the programming needs no change, used in calculators and peripheral devices.

  • Question: Who created the third generation computer?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Jack Kilby

  • Question: What is Computer Animation?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Computer animation is the process used for digitally generating animated images. The more general term computer-generated imagery (CGI) encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only refers to moving images. Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics, although 2D computer graphics are still used for stylistic, low bandwidth, and faster real-time renderings. Sometimes, the target of the animation is the computer itself, but sometimes film as well

  • Question: Explain the electric flux.

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    In electromagnetism, electric flux is the measure of the electric field through a given surface,  although an electric field in itself cannot flow. It is a way of describing the electric field strength at any distance from the charge causing the field.

    The electric field E can exert a force on an electric charge at any point in space. The electric field is proportional to the gradient of the voltage.

  • Question: What is Office Communicator?

    Posted in: MS Office | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft Office Communicator 2007 is an official add-on from Microsoft that is designed to allow better collaboration and communications between several individuals. At the core, Microsoft Office Communicator 2007 contains an IM and voice call component, with the ability to share desktops and videos between participants. Microsoft Office Communicator 2007 downloads and installs seamlessly.

  • Question: What is Tally ERP 9?

    Posted in: Tally ERP 9 | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Tally.ERP 9 is one of the most popular accounting software used in India. It is a complete enterprise software for small & medium enterprises.

    Tally.ERP 9 is a perfect business management solution and GST software with an ideal combination of function, control and in-built customisability.

    Tally.ERP 9 permits business owners and their associates to interact more in accounts related discussions and is a complete product which retains its original simplicity but yet offers comprehensive business functionalities such as Accounting, Finance, Inventory, Sales, Purchase, Point of Sales, Manufacturing, Costing, Job Costing, Payroll and Branch Management along with compliance capabilities for Excise, TDS, TCS, and now GST too!

  • Question: What is MS Outlook?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft Outlook is a personal information manager from Microsoft, available as a part of the Microsoft Office suite. Primarily an email application, it also includes a calendar, task manager, contact manager, note taking, journal, and web browsing.

  • Question: What is MS Windows 2007?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Windows 7 is a personal computer operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems.

  • Question: What is MS Excel?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet developed by Microsoft for Windows, macOS, Android and iOS. It features calculation, graphing tools, pivot tables, and a macro programming language called Visual Basic for Applications. It has been a very widely applied spreadsheet for these platforms, especially since version 5 in 1993, and it has replaced Lotus 1-2-3 as the industry standard for spreadsheets. Excel forms part of the Microsoft Office suite of software.

  • Question: What is MS Front Page?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft FrontPage (full name Microsoft Office FrontPage) is a discontinued WYSIWYG HTML editor and website administration tool from Microsoft for the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems. It was branded as part of the Microsoft Office suite from 1997 to 2003. Microsoft FrontPage has since been replaced by Microsoft Expression Web and SharePoint Designer, which were first released in December 2006 alongside Microsoft Office 2007, but these two products were also discontinued in favor of a web-based version of SharePoint Designer, as those three HTML editors were desktop applications.

  • Question: What is MS Office?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft Office, or simply Office, is a family of client software, server software, and services developed by Microsoft. It was first announced by Bill Gates on August 1, 1988, at COMDEX in Las Vegas. Initially a marketing term for an office suite (bundled set of productivity applications), the first version of Office contained Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand.

  • Question: What is MS PowerPoint?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft PowerPoint is a powerful presentation software developed by Microsoft. It is a standard component of the company's Microsoft Office suite software, and is bundled together with Word, Excel and other Office productivity tools. The program uses slides to convey information rich in multimedia. The term "slide" refers to the slide projector, which this software effectively replaces.

  • Question: What is MS Access?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft Access is a database management system (DBMS) from Microsoft that combines the relational Microsoft Jet Database Engine with a graphical user interface and software-development tools. It is a member of the Microsoft Office suite of applications, included in the Professional and higher editions or sold separately.

    Microsoft Access stores data in its own format based on the Access Jet Database Engine. It can also import or link directly to data stored in other applications and databases

  • Question: What is Internet & Email?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Internet (portmanteau of interconnected network) is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies. The Internet carries a vast range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents and applications of the World Wide Web (WWW), electronic mail, telephony, and file sharing.

    Electronic mail (email or e-mail) is a method of exchanging messages ("mail") between people using electronic devices. Invented by Ray Tomlinson, email first entered limited use in the 1960s and by the mid-1970s had taken the form now recognized as email. Email operates across computer networks, which today is primarily the Internet. Some early email systems required the author and the recipient to both be online at the same time, in common with instant messaging. Today's email systems are based on a store-and-forward model.

  • Question: What is Hibernate?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Hibernate ORM (Hibernate in short) is an object-relational mapping tool for the Java programming language. It provides a framework for mapping an object-oriented domain model to a relational database. Hibernate handles object-relational impedance mismatch problems by replacing direct, persistent database accesses with high-level object handling functions.

  • Question: What do you mean by machine

    Posted in: Advanced Excel | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A machine (or mechanical device) is a mechanical structure that uses power to apply forces and control movement to perform an intended action. Machines can be driven by animals and people, by natural forces such as wind and water, and by chemical, thermal, or electrical power, and include a system of mechanisms that shape the actuator input to achieve a specific application of output forces and movement.

  • Question: What is computer course?

    Posted in: Basic Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Computer course refers to a course dedicated to helping educate users on computer-related topics. Computer training professionals instruct and help users acquire proficiency in a wide array of areas, including software, hardware, database management, programming, networking and more.

  • Question: What is Excel Macro?

    Posted in: Advanced Excel | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A macro is a piece of programming code that runs in Excel environment and helps automate routine tasks. In a layman's language, a macro is a recording of your routine steps in Excel that you can replay using a single button

  • Question: What is Clip Art?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Clip art is a form of electronic graphic art that consists of simple illustrations as opposed to photographic images, Clip art is generally available in a large number of file formats, which are either bitmaps or vector graphics.

  • Question: What is a balanced diet?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    a balanced diet is a diet that contains an adequate quantity of the nutrients that we require in a day.  A balanced diet includes six main nutrients, i.e. Fats, Protein, Carbohydrates, Fibre, Vitamins, and Minerals, All these nutrients are present in the foods that we eat. Different food items have different proportions of nutrients present in them. The requirements of the nutrients depend on the age, gender, and health of a person.

  • Answer:

    found many applications, including electrical components such as inductors and transformers, and devices such as electric motors and generators.

  • Question: Who was mother teresa

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Mother Teresa, the Roman Catholic nun who worked with the poor in the Indian city of Kolkata (Calcutta), is being declared a saint, The order she founded, the Missionaries of Charity, has grown to include 4,500 nuns and 400 brothers in 87 countries, tending to the poor and dying in the slums of 160 cities, She decided as early as 12 that she wanted to become a missionary in India.

  • Question: highlight the main features of mauryan adminstration?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The main features of Mauryan administration were:

    • There were five important political centres in the Mauryan Empire: Patliputra (the capital city) and the provincial centres of Taxila, Ujjayini, Tosali and Suvarnagiri.
    • It was not possible for such a large empire to have a uniform administrative system so historians believe that the administrative control was perhaps strongest in the capital and in provincial centres.
    • Communications along the land and riverine routes were developed to administer the Empire.
    • The army was an important tool for not only extending the territories of the empire but also for administering them.
    • Committees and sub-committees were formed for coordinating military activities. They looked after the navy, horses, chariots, elephants, recruiting soldiers and managing transport and food supplies for soldiers.
    • Asoka held his Empire together by propagating the doctrine of Dhamma, whose principles were simple and universally applicable. The doctrine propagated the ideas of peace, non-violence and respect towards elders. Dhamma mahamattas were appointed to spread the principles of Dhamma.
    • The last feature of the Mauryan administration is evident in the Asokan inscriptions that we have studied. It is because Ashoka inscribed the main features of his policy of 'dhamma'. According to the inscriptions, he had also appointed Special officers called Dhamma Mahamtras to spread Dhamma

  • Question: What are the achievements of the Early Nationalist?

    Posted in: History | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Early Nationalists created a national awakening among the people that made Indians conscious of the bonds of common political, economic, and cultural interests that united them. They also trained people in politics by popularising the ideas of democracy, civil liberties, secularism and nationalism. The Early Nationalists did pioneering work by exposing the true nature of British rule in India. They made the people realise the economic content and character of British imperialism. In doing so, they weakened the foundations of British rule in India. Their political and economic programmes established the idea that India must be ruled in the interest of the Indians. The efforts of the Early Nationalists also led to the implementation of various social reforms such as the appointment of a Public Service Commission. A resolution of the House of Commons (1893) allowing for simultaneous examination for the Indian Civil Service in London and India. Appointment of the Welby Commission on Indian Expenditure (1895). They also passed The Indian Councils Act of 1892. These achievements served as the basis for nationalist movements in later years by extremist leaders.

  • Question: What is fertilization?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Fertilisation or fertilization (see spelling differences), also known as generative fertilisation, insemination, pollination, fecundation, syngamy and impregnation, is the fusion of gametes to initiate the development of a new individual organism or offspring. This cycle of fertilisation and development of new individuals is called sexual reproduction. During double fertilisation in angiosperms the haploid male gamete combines with two haploid polar nuclei to form a triploid primary endosperm nucleus by the process of vegetative fertilisation

  • Question: What is granite used for?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Granite is used in buildings, bridges, paving, monuments, and many other exterior projects. Indoors, polished granite slabs and tiles are used in countertops, tile floors, stair treads and many other design elements.

  • Question: what is the meaning of linguist

    Posted in: English | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A linguist is someone who studies language. Linguists study every aspect of language, including vocabulary, grammar, the sound of language, and how words evolve over time. The study of language is called linguistics, and people who study linguistics are linguists.

  • Question: What is deposition?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Deposition is the geological process in which sediments, soil and rocks are added to a landform or land mass. Wind, ice, water, and gravity transport previously weathered surface material, which, at the loss of enough kinetic energy in the fluid, is deposited, building up layers of sediment.

  • Question: What is sound energy?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    In physics, sound energy is a form of energy. Sound is a mechanical wave and as such consists physically in oscillatory elastic compression and in oscillatory displacement of a fluid. Therefore, the medium acts as storage for both potential and kinetic energy

  • Question: How can we reduce water pollution?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    If you want to help keep our waters clean, there are many things you can do to help. You can prevent water pollution of nearby rivers and lakes as well as groundwater and drinking water by following some simple guidelines in your everyday life.

    • Conserve water by turning off the tap when running water is not necessary. This helps prevent water shortages and reduces the amount of contaminated water that needs treatment.
    • Be careful about what you throw down your sink or toilet. Don’t throw paints, oils or other forms of litter down the drain. Use environmentally household products, such as washing powder, household cleaning agents and toiletries.
    • Take great care not to overuse pesticides and fertilisers. This will prevent runoffs of the material into nearby water sources.
    • By having more plants in your garden you are preventing fertiliser, pesticides and contaminated water from running off into nearby water sources.
    • Don’t throw litter into rivers, lakes or oceans. Help clean up any litter you see on beaches or in rivers and lakes, make sure it is safe to collect the litter and put it in a nearby dustbin.

  • Question: What are pure substances?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    In chemistry, a pure substance is a sample of matter with both definite and constant composition and distinct chemical properties. To avoid confusion, a pure substance is often referred to as a "chemical substance."

    Examples of pure substances include chemical elements and compounds. Alloys and other solutions may also be considered pure if they have a constant composition.

    • Water
    • Diamond
    • Gold
    • Table salt (sodium chloride)
    • Ethanol
    • Brass
    • Bronze
    • Saline solution

  • Question: What is biosphere?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The biosphere is the worldwide sum of all ecosystems. It can also be termed the zone of life on Earth, a closed system (apart from solar and cosmic radiation and heat from the interior of the Earth), and largely self-regulating. By the most general biophysiological definition, the biosphere is the global ecological system integrating all living beings and their relationships, including their interaction with the elements of the lithosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The biosphere is postulated to have evolved, beginning with a process of biopoiesis (life created naturally from non-living matter, such as simple organic compounds) or biogenesis (life created from living matter), at least some 3.5 billion years ago.

  • Question: What are vectors?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Vector (biology) Traditionally in medicine, a vector is an organism that does not cause disease itself but which spreads infection by conveying pathogens from one host to another. Species of mosquito, for example, serve as vectors for the deadly disease Malaria

  • Question: What is oral hygiene?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Oral hygiene is the practice of keeping one's mouth clean and free of disease and other problems (e.g. bad breath) by regular brushing of the teeth (dental hygiene) and cleaning between the teeth. It is important that oral hygiene be carried out on a regular basis to enable prevention of dental disease and bad breath. The most common types of dental disease are tooth decay (cavitiesdental caries) and gum diseases, including gingivitis, and periodontitis.

  • Question: What is meant by booting a computer ?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Booting a computer refers to the process of powering on the computer and starting the operating system. ... The boot process loads the operating system into main memory or the random access memory (RAM) installed on your computer

  • Question: What are wildcards?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Wildcards are characters that indicate a command applies to all resources whose names match a specified character string.

    The asterisk (*) wildcard tells the system to match zero or more specified characters, up to the maximum length of the string. An asterisk can start the character string, end it, appear in the middle, or appear in multiple places in the string. A single * for the name indicates that all resource names for the particular field are to match

  • Question: What are the shortcut keys for Undo and Redo commands?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    UNDO - CTRL+Z

    REDO - CTRL+Y

  • Question: What are the different PowerPoint views?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Microsoft PowerPoint has three main views: normal view, slide sorter view, and slide show view

  • Question: What is poultry farming?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Poultry farming is the breeding, rearing and managing of poultry which comprises of chickens, turkeys, quails, pheasants, ducks, geese, ostriches, and other domestic birds either extensively or intensively for food, genetics, and their by-products - but especially for the benefit of man. There are a number of industries that exist to either service or utilize the products of poultry farming. For example, the feed milling industries, restaurants, pillow making industries, hatcheries etc

  • Question: What is a food web?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A food web is the natural interconnection of food chains and a graphical representation of what-eats-what in an ecological community.

  • Question: What are the various components of the biosphere?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The various components of Biosphere are Lithosphere, Hydrosphere and Atmosphere

  • Question: What kind of organisms are first level consumers?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Herbivores are first level consumers

  • Question: Why are plants called producers?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Plants are called producers. This is because they produce their own food! They do this by using light energy from the Sun, carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil to produce food - in the form of glucouse/sugar.

  • Question: How do plants depend upon animals?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    plants depend upon animals for pollination, Seed dispersal and Carbon dioxide.

  • Question: What are mainframe computers?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Mainframe computers are computers used primarily by large organizations for critical applications; bulk data processing, such as census, industry and consumer statistics, enterprise resource planning; and transaction processing.

  • Question: What are placeholders?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    In Microsoft PowerPoint, placeholders are boxes with dotted borders that contain content and reside within a slide layout. All built-in slide layouts that come with PowerPoint contain content placeholders

  • Question: What is hypertext?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Hypertext is a software system allowing extensive cross-referencing between related sections of text and associated graphic material

  • Question: What is meant by e-mail?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Electronic mail (email or e-mail) is a method of exchanging messages ("mail") between people using electronic devices

  • Answer:

    AMOEBA is an organism which change its shape frequently

  • Question: What is melittology?

    Posted in: Computer Science | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Melittology is a branch of entomology concerning the scientific study of bees. It may also be called apicology.

  • Answer:

    Jehangir Ratanji Dadabhoy Tata set up the first iron and steel work at jamshedpur

  • Question: What are tectonic plates?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A tectonic plate is a massive, irregularly shaped slab of solid rock, generally composed of both continental and oceanic lithosphere. Plate size can vary greatly, from a few hundred to thousands of kilometers across; the Pacific and Antarctic Plates are among the largest. Plate thickness also varies greatly, ranging from less than 15 km for young oceanic lithosphere to about 200 km or more for ancient continental lithosphere for example, the interior parts of North and South America.

  • Question: Which is an example of a chemical change?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    mixing hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide to make salt and water

  • Question: Which is an example of a physical change?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    casting silver in a mold

  • Question: Is Rusting a chemical change?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Yes, Rusting of Iron is a chemical change

  • Question: Coldest planet of the solar system is...

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Neptune is considered the coldest planet with average temperatures of -200ºC.

  • Question: Mention any two objectives of rain water harvesting.

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    1. To raise the underground water table.

    2. To reduce soils erosion

    3. To meet the increasing demand of water

  • Question: What is the location of mangrove forest in India?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Sundarbans is the largest mangrove forest in the world, located in the Ganges River delta in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India

  • Question: Explain why chloroplast is called kitchen of the cell

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    chloroplast contain a green pigment called chlorophyll. With the help of this chlorophyll, the plants prepare their food in the presence of water, sunlight and oxygen. Hence, chloroplasts are called the kitchen of a plant cell

  • Question: How does a fish swim in water?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Fish swim by flexing their bodies and tail back and forth. Fish stretch or expand their muscles on one side of their body, while relaxing the muscles on the other side. This motion moves them forward through the water

  • Question: What is pasteurization?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Pasteurization is a process in which water and certain packaged and non-packaged foods are treated with mild heat, usually to less than 100 °C, to eliminate pathogens and extend shelf life

  • Question: What is light microscope?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The compound light microscope uses visible light to directly illuminate specimens in a two-lens system, resulting in the illuminated specimen appearing dark against a bright background.

  • Question: What is protoplasm?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Protoplasm is the organized colloidal complex of organic and inorganic substances (such as proteins and water) that constitutes the living nucleus, cytoplasm, plastids, and mitochondria of the cell

  • Question: What is dihydroepiandrosterone?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), also known as androstenolone, is an endogenous steroid hormone. It is one of the most abundant circulating steroids in humans, in whom it is produced in the adrenal glands, the gonads, and the brain.

  • Question: What is the definition Population Density?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Population density is a measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume

  • Question: What are nutrients?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Nutrients are compounds in foods essential to life and health, providing us with energy, the building blocks for repair and growth and substances necessary to regulate chemical processes.

  • Question: What is Strabismus?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Strabismus is a condition in which the eyes do not properly align with each other when looking at an object.The eye that is focused on an object can alternate. The condition may be present occasionally or constantly

  • Question: What is hypertrichosis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Hypertrichosis is an abnormal amount of hair growth over the body

  • Question: What is blood transfusion?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Blood transfusion is the process of transferring blood or blood products into one's circulation intravenously

  • Question: What are idiosomes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    A distinct spheroidal region of the cytoplasm surrounding the centrioles in the developing germ cells of animals, containing granules and membranous structures and associated with the Golgi apparatus

  • Question: What are Autosomes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Autosome is any chromosome which is not a sex chromosome, or is not involved in sex determination. It occurs in pairs in somatic cells and singly in gametes

  • Question: What does IISCO stand for?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Indian Iron & Steel Company

  • Question: What does CPWD stands for?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    CWPD stands for Central Public Works Department

  • Question: What is 'Retting'?

    Posted in: Geography | Date: 22/11/2019

    Answer:

    Retting is a process employing the action of micro-organisms and moisture on plants to dissolve or rot away much of the cellular tissues and pectins surrounding bast-fibre bundles, and so facilitating separation of the fibre from the stem

  • Question: How does air pollution cause acid rain?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    compounds like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are released into the air by pollution, released oxides reacts and forms acid rain.

  • Question: How are animals dependent upon plants?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    Animals are totally dependent on plants. First of all plants produce oxygen which is vital for life on earth. Then, for many animals plants are their basic food, or if plants don’t make up 100 % of their diet, plants are nevertheless essential in their food supply. Plants are also used by animals (and men) as material for building nests (and or homes). Carnivorous animals eat animals which are herbivorous, and without plants they wouldn’t survive, so the carnivors would quickly disappear. Plants are also vital in the maintaining of the climate and without plants the earth’s surface would be subject to erosion. 

  • Question: How can a magnet be demagnetised?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    Magnet can de demagnetised by heating past the Curie point, applying a strong magnetic field, applying alternating current, or hammering the metal.

  • Question: What are deficiency diseases?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    Diseases caused by a lack of essential dietary elements and especially a vitamin or mineral are called deficiency diseases.

     

  • Question: What habits lead to obesity?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    In most people obesity is caused by eating too much and moving too little, below are the reasons for obesity

    Lifestyle choices

    Lack of exercise and physical activity

    Medical conditions

    Genetics

  • Question: What is biodegradable waste?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    Biodegradable waste is a type of waste, typically originating from plant or animal sources, which may be degraded by other living organisms. Biodegradable waste can be commonly found in municipal solid waste (sometimes called biodegradable municipal waste, or BMW) as green waste, food waste, paper waste, and biodegradable plastics. Other biodegradable wastes include human waste, manure, sewage, slaughterhouse waste.

  • Question: What are the causes of water pollution?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    1. Industrial waste

    2. Sewage and wastewater

    3. Mining activities

    4. Marine dumping

    5. Accidental oil leakage

    6. The burning of fossil fuels

    7. Chemical fertilizers and pesticides

    8. Leakage from sewer lines

    9. Global warming

    10. Radioactive waste

    11. Urban development

    12. Leakage from the landfills

    13. Animal waste

    14. Underground storage leakage

  • Question: What is mechanical advantage of a machine?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 25/11/2019

    Answer:

    It is the ratio of the effectiveness of the machine to output a useful mechanical force and speed relative to input force and speed. 

  • Question: What do you mean by a pointer?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    In computer science, a pointer is a programming language object that stores the memory address of another value located in computer memory. A pointer references a location in memory, and obtaining the value stored at that location is known as dereferencing the pointer. As an analogy, a page number in a book's index could be considered a pointer to the corresponding page; dereferencing such a pointer would be done by flipping to the page with the given page number and reading the text found on that page.

  • Question: Define an orifice-meter.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    An orifice meter is a thin plate with a chamfered edge to the hole in the middle of it which is placed into a long straight tube. Pressure tappings are made either side of the orifice plate and a manometer is connected between the two tappings. The pressure differential is a measure of the flow through the pipe

  • Question: Describe an aerofoil.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    An aerofoil is the term used to describe the cross-sectional shape of an object that, when moved through a fluid such as air, creates an aerodynamic force. Aerofoils are employed on aircraft as wings to produce lift or as propeller blades to produce thrust. Both these forces are produce perpendicular to the air flow. Drag is a consequence of the production of lift/thrust and acts parallel to the airflow.

  • Question: Define Newton's Law of viscosity.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Newton’s viscosity law’s states that the shear stress between adjacent fluid layers is proportional to the velocity gradients between the two layers

  • Question: What is a venturimeter?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Venturi meter is a device used to measure the flow rate or discharge of fluid through a pipe.

  • Question: Define ecological succession.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Ecological succession is the process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time. The time scale can be decades, or even millions of years after a mass extinction.

  • Question: What do you mean by gradually varied flow?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Gradually Varied Flow is defined as steady non-uniform flow in a channel in which there are gradual changes in the water depth

  • Question: Explain a Conjugate Beam.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A conjugate beam is an imaginary beam with imaginary support conditions and imaginary loading meant to find slope and deflection in a real beam. Conjugate beam has same length as that of real beam

  • Question: Define Young's modulus.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Young's modulus is defined as the ratio of stress below the proportional limit to the corresponding strain. It is a measure of the rigidity or stiffness of a material.

  • Question: Define intensity of irrigation.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Intensity of irrigation is defined as the percentage of the C.C.A (culturable commanded area ) propesed to be irrigated during a year.

  • Question: What causes cracks in a building?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The most common causes of cracking are:

    • Ground movement (beneath foundations) caused by clay shrinkage, land slip, vibration, subsidence, settlement, heave, sway, and so on.
    • Foundation failure due to the decay of soft clay brick, concrete erosion due to chemical contaminants, and so on.
    • Decay of the building fabric, due to woodworm, rust, and so on.
    • Moisture movement that causes materials to expand or contract, perhaps due to the presence of vegetation or faulty or damaged drains.
    • Thermal movement that causes materials to expand or contract as temperature increases or decreases.
    • Inherent defects, particularly in historic structures.
    • Faulty or damaged drains.
    • Suspended structures such as floors that deform under load.
    • Tree root growth.
    • Absence of foundations in older buildings.

  • Question: Define vena contracta.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Vena contracta is the point in a fluid stream where the diameter of the stream is the least, and fluid velocity is at its maximum, such as in the case of a stream issuing out of a nozzle

  • Question: What are the harmful constituents of cement?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    There are 2 harmful constituents of cement, they are Alkali oxides (K2O and Na2O) and Magnesium Oxide (MgO), If the amount of alkali oxides exceeds 1%, it leads to the failure of concrete made from that cement and if the content of magnesium oxide exceeds 5%, it causes cracks after mortar or concrete hardens

  • Question: What are exogenous trees?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Exogenous trees, which comprise the great majority of modern trees (all conifers, and all broadleaf trees), grow by the addition of new wood outwards, immediately under the bark

  • Question: Write at least six types of cements.

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC), Rapid Hardening Cement, Quick setting cement, Low Heat Cement, Sulphates resisting cement, High Alumina Cement, White Cement, Coloured cement, Air Entraining Cement, Expansive cement, Hydrophobic cement

  • Question: What is meant by contour interval?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A contour interval in surveying is the vertical distance or the difference in the elevation between the two contour lines in a topographical map

  • Question: explain permeability

    Posted in: Electronics | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Permeability is a constant of proportionality that exists between magnetic induction and magnetic field intensity. This constant is equal to approximately 1.257 x 10-6 henry per meter (H/m) in free space (a vacuum). In other materials it can be much different, often substantially greater than the free-space value, which is symbolized µo

  • Question: What is Instrumentation?

    Posted in: Instrumentation | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Instrumentation is defined as the use of measuring instruments(device which measures physical quantities like heat,temp etc.) to control and monitor a process.

  • Question: WHAT IS CONDUCTION BAND

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The conduction band is the band of electron orbitals that electrons can bounce up into from the valence band when energized

  • Question: What is 'floating foundation' ?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A floating foundation is a type of foundation constructed by excavating the soil in such a way that the weight of structure built on the soil is nearly equal to the total weight of the soil excavated from the ground including the weight water in the soil before the construction of structure

  • Question: What is critical path?

    Posted in: Civil | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A critical path is a sequence of interdependent activities or tasks that must be finished before the project can be finished. It is the longest path (i.e. path with the longest duration) from project start to finish

  • Question: Is\(CH_3COOH\) an acid or a base?

    Posted in: Chemical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    It is an Acid

  • Question: What is power quality meter ?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A power quality meter is used to measure electric power signals to determine the load's ability to function properly with that electric power

  • Question: Define software maintenance.

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Software Maintenance is the process of modifying a software product after it has been delivered to the customer. The main purpose of software maintenance is to modify and update software application after delivery to correct faults and to improve performance.

  • Question: What is natural frequency?

    Posted in: Aeronautical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The natural frequency of an object is the frequency of a sound wave at which the object resonates

  • Question: State Gauss's law for electrostatic.

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The Gauss' Law is used to find electric field when the charge is continuously distributed within an object with symmetrical geometry, such as sphere, cylinder, or plane.

  • Question: What is a saturable reactor?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A saturable reactor in electrical engineering is a special form of inductor where the magnetic core can be deliberately saturated by a direct electric current in a control winding

  • Question: what is an ideal transformer

    Posted in: Electrical,Electronics,Electronics | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The transformer which is free from all types of losses is known as an ideal transformer

  • Question: What is electric traction?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Electric traction means using the electric power for traction system (i.e. for railways, trams, trolleys etc).

    Electric traction means use of the electricity for railways,trams, trolleys etc. Now a days, magnetic traction is also used for bullet trains.and basically dc motors are used for electric traction systems

  • Question: What is inrush current?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Inrush current is the instantaneous high input current drawn by a power supply or electrical equipment at turn-on. This arises due to the high initial currents required to charge the capacitors and inductors or transformers

  • Question: State applications of superconductors.

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Power transmission cables, Transformers, Motors and generators, Fault current limiters, Superconducting magnets including MRI and research magnets.

  • Question: What is meant by polarisation?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Polarization is a property applying to transverse waves that specifies the geometrical orientation of the oscillations. 

  • Question: What are thermistors?

    Posted in: Electrical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A thermistor is a type of resistor whose resistance is dependent on temperature, more so than in standard resistors

  • Question: define ac circuit

    Posted in: Electrical,Electronics,Electronics | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    The path for the flow of alternating current is called an AC Circuit

  • Question: What is a Decoder?

    Posted in: Computer | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    A decoder is a circuit that changes a code into a set of signals, it does the reverse of encoding

  • Question: define ac voltage

    Posted in: Electrical,Electronics,Electronics | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    An Alternating Current Voltage is one in which the value of either the voltage or the current varies about a particular mean value and reverses direction periodically.

  • Question: What is Aerospace engineering?

    Posted in: Aeronautical | Date: 26/11/2019

    Answer:

    Aerospace Engineering is a branch of Engineering that provides skills and knowledge to design, manufacture and maintain spacecrafts, aircrafts, missiles and weapons systems

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