LearnPick Navigation
Close

CLASS 1OTH CBSE ENGLISH NOTES

Published in: English
2,673 views
  • M

    Mhirin

    • Jammu
    • 3 Years of Experience
    • Qualification: Graduate
    • Teaches: All Subjects, Social Studies, History, Biology, Al...
  • Contact this tutor

POEM 6TH :- SNAKE POEM 1ST :- THE FROG AND THE NIGHTINGLE

  • 1
    1 "THE FROG AND THE NIGHTINGLE" POETRY-I By:-Vikram Seth 10th ENGLISH SUMMARY Once upon a time there was a presumptuous frog who lived in a place called Bingle Bog. This frog croaked from night to morning in his unpleasant voice. Though the other creatures did not like his voice, they had no choice but to listen to him as all complaints, pleas and protests fell on deaf ears. Then one night a nightingale came to the Bog. She sang her melodious song and all the creatures of the Bog listened to her, mesmerized. They asked her to sing again and again. The nightingale continued to sing because she was unused to such applause. The next night when the nightingale was about to sing, the possessive frog told her that he owned the tree she sang on. He claimed to be a music critic with a noted baritone. Impressed by the frog's credentials, and unsure of her own ability, the nightingale asked the frog to comment upon her song. The arrogant frog told that she lacked training and offered to teach her for a fee. The nightingale, excited and pleased, began training under the frog. He began to charge an admission fee from those who came to hear the nightingale. The frog made her practise in all kinds of weather for long hours. Soon the nightingale's voice began to lose its melodious quality. The creatures of the Bog lost interest in her. The bird became more and more sorrowful as her popularity decreased. The frog rebuked her sharply, adding to her misery. When the frog told her to puff up her lungs and sing, the bird tried to follow his advice, puffed up her lungs, burst a vein and died. The frog once again became the unrivalled singer of the Bog. Reference to context type questions. Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow. Write the answers in one or two lines only.
  • 2
    1. 2 Once upon a time a frog. Crocked away in Bingle Bog. Every night from dusk to dawn He croaked awn and awn and awn. (a) What did the frog do all night? Ans. He croaked every night from dusk to dawn. (b)How did the other creatures react to his voice? Ans. The other creatures hated his voice. They threw stones, sticks, and bricks at him, begged him to stop singing, Insulted him, and complained about him but in vain. (c) Find a word in the above lines which the poet has made up? Why has he done Ans. 'Awn' . He has done so to create a rhyme scheme with dawn. 2. Other creatures loathed his voice, But, alas, they had no choice, And the crass cacophony Blared out from the sumac tree At whose foot the frog each night Minstrelled on till morning light. (a) Where did the frog live? Ans. The frog lived under the sumac tree in Bingle Bog. (b) What did the other creatures not have any choice in? Why?
  • 3
    3 Ans. The other creatures were forced to listen to the frog's song all night. All their efforts to make him stop singing were in vain. (c) Explain 'crass cacophony'. Ans. The phrase means a very loud and unpleasant noise. 3. Neither stones nor prayers nor sticks, Insults or complaints or bricks Stilled the frog's determination To display his heart's elation. (a) How did the other creatures try to quieten the frog? Ans. They threw stones, sticks, and bricks at him, begged him to stop singing, insulted him, and complained about him. (b) Did they succeed in their efforts? Ans. No, they did not succeed in their efforts. The frog continued to sing despite their efforts. (c) What features of the frog's personality is brought out in the above lines? Ans. The frog was thick-skinned and impervious to insults. He was determined and stubborn. 9 4. But one night a nightingale In the moonlight cold and pale Perched upon the sumac tree Casting forth her melody. (a) Whose songs had echoed in the Bog all night earlier?
  • 4
    4 Ans. The frog's song. (b) What did the nightingale do? Ans. The nightingale sat on the sumac tree singing her melodious song. (c) How was the nightingale's song different from the frog's? Ans. The nightingale's song was melodious while the frog's song was cross cacophony. 5. Dumbstruck sat the gaping frog, And the whole admiring Bog, Started towards the sumac, rapt, And, when she had ended, clapped, (a) Explain the phrase 'whole admiring Bog'. Ans. All the creatures of the Bog were struck with admiration for the nightingale's song. (b)How did the frog react to the nightingale's song? Ans. The frog was dumbstruck by the beauty of her voice. (c) What had been the frog's experience at the sumac tree? Ans. When the frog sang, the other creatures threw stones, sticks, and bricks a him, begged him to stop singing, insulted him, and complained about him. 6. Ducks had swum and herons waded To her as she serenaded, And a solitary loon Wept, beneath the summer moon.
  • 5
    5 (a) Who is 'she' in the above lines? Why did the ducks and herons come towards her? Ans. The nightingale. They came to hear her song. (b) Who was the solitary loon? How was his behaviour different from that of the others? Ans. Loons are water birds. A single loon came to listen to the nightingale's song. He was so overcome by emotions that he wept on hearing on her beautiful song. 7. Toads and teals and tiddlers, captured By her voice, cheered on, enraptured: 'Bravo!' 'Too divine!' 'Encore! ' So the nightingale once more, Quite unused to such applause, Sang till dawn without a pause. (a) How do you know that the nightingale's song was a sensation? Ans. The creatures of the Bog heard her voice and swam towards her. They listened to her song, enraptured, and encouraged her to sing the whole night long. (b) How did the nightingale react to the applause? 9 Ans. She sang the whole night without a pause. (c) Who are 'toads and teals and tiddlers'? Ans. Toads-a type of a frog' teals- freshwater ducks; tiddlers-small fish. 8. Next night when the Nightingale Shook her head and twitched her tail,
  • 6
    6 Closed an eye and fluffed a wing And had cleared her throat to sing She was startled by a croak. (a) Where is the nightingale? Who lived at the foot of the tree? Ans. The nightingale is on the sumac tree in Bingle Bog. The frog lived at the foot of the tree. (b) How do you know that the nightingale was getting read to sing? Ans. The nightingale shook her head and twitched her tail. Then she closed an eye, fluffed a wing and cleared her throat preparing to start singing. (c) What surprised the nightingale? Ans. The frog's croak surprised the nightingale. 9. 'Sorry-was that you who spoke?' She enquired when the fog Hopped towards her from the bog. 'Yes', the frog replied. 'You see, I'm the frog who owns this tree. (a) Who is 'she'? What aspect of the frog's personality is revealed in these lines? Ans. 'She' is the nightingale. The frog is territorial and possessive. (b) How did the frog introduce himself? Ans. The frog introduced himself as the owner of the sumac tree. 10. 'Yes', the frog replied. 'You see,
  • 7
    7 I'm the frog who owns this tree. In this bog I've long been known For my splendid baritone And, of course, I wield my pen For Bog Trumpet now and then. ' (a) What quality does the frog reveal in the second line of this extract? Ans. He is boastful (b) What is a baritone? Ans. Baritone is a deep male singing voice. (c) Why does he say this? Ans. He says this to impress the nightingale and to get her under his influence. 11. 'Did you .did you like my song?' 'Not too bad —but far too long. The technique was fine, of course, But it lacked a certain force' 9 (a) Who is commenting on whose song? What is his comment? Ans. The frog is commenting on the nightingale's song. The song was not too bad but it is was too long and it lacked intensity and depth. (b)Do you think he is a fair judge of the other person's song? Give reasons.
  • 8
    8 Ans. No, he is not a fair judge because he is not a good singer himself and so possibly does not know much about singing. Moreover, he is jealous as the creatures who insulted his singing admired the nightingale's song. 12. 'Oh!' the nightingale confessed, Greatly flattered and impressed That a critic of such note Had discussed her art and throat; (a)What were his comments on the nightingale's singing? Ans. The song was not too bad but it was far too long and it lacked intensity and depth. (b) How did the nightingale respond to the criticism? Ans. She was dejected to hear that her song was not good enough but flattered and impressed to have been noticed by a great critic. (c) What impression do you form of the nightingale? Ans. She lacked confidence and was prone to influence. She was naive and gullible. 13. I don't think the song's divine But-oh, well-at least it's mine' -9 That's not much to boast about'. Said the heartless frog. (a) Why does the nightingale feel her song is not divine? Ans. She is a modest creature. She is ready to accept her mistakes and is willing to learn.
  • 9
    9 (b) Who had composed the nightingale's song? Ans. It is her own song. (c) How does the frog change his own statement: 'That's not much to boast about', in the end? Ans. In the end the frog says that the bird should have realized that 'your song must be your own 14. 'That's not much to boast about' Said the heartless frog. 'Without Proper training such as I And few others-can supply, (a) Who is the frog speaking to? What does 'that' refer to? Ans. The frog is speaking to the nightingale. That' refers to the fact that the song the nightingale sang was her own composition. (b) Why is the frog referred to as heartless? Ans. The frog has been called heartless as he did not appreciate the nightingale's melodious voice. He is cruel and uncaring about the nightingale's feelings as the citizens her song. 9 15. You'll remain a mere beginner, But with me you'll be a winner'. (a) How will the frog change the nightingale's singing? Ans. By teaching the nightingale the technique of singing, the frog promised to transform her from a mere beginner to a singing sensation.
  • 10
    10 (b) On what condition does the frog agree to teach the nightingale? What according to the frog was lacking in the nightingale's song? Ans. The frog agreed on the condition of charging a modest fee. Her song was too long and lacked intensity and depth. (c) How will the fee not hurt the nightingale? Ans. The frog will not take it directly from her but will charge admission fees from the creatures who come to hear the bird sing. 16. 'Dearest frog', the nightingale Breathed; 'This is a fairy tale- And you 're Mozart in disguise Come to earth before my eyes' 'Well, I charge a modest fee.' 'Oh! ' 'But it won't hurt, you'll see' (a)What was a fairy tale? Ans. That a famous singer and music critic like the frog was ready to teach the nightingale. (b) How was the listener 'Mozart in disguise'? Ans. The nightingale is flattered and impressed by the frog who claims to be a famous singer and a critic. She praises the frog by comparing him to the great music composer, Mozart. (c) Why is the nightingale worried at the mention of the fee?
  • 11
    11 Ans. She does not have money to pay the frog for music lessons. 17. Now the nightingale, inspired, Flushed with confidence and fired With both art and adoration, Sang-and was a huge sensation. (a) What inspired the nightingale to sing? Ans. The appreciation of the audience inspired the nightingale to sing beautifully. (b) How did the nightingale become a sensation? Ans. The Melodious song of the nightingale attracted creatures of the Bog who comes from miles around to hear her sing. (c) Explain 'flushed with confidence'. Ans. The appreciation and success that the nightingale received made her feel confident. She also felt excited and pleased with herself as she began to sing. 18. Animals for miles around Flocked towards the magic sound. And the frog with great precision Counted heads and charged admission. (a) Why did the animals come in large numbers? Ans. The animals came to hear the nightingale's song. (b) What is the magic sound? Ans. The magic sound refers to the melodious song of the nightingale. (c) How did the frog make money?
  • 12
    12 Ans. The frog charged the creatures admission fee when they cannot to hear the nightingale sing and the kept the money as his fee for training the nightingale. 19. Though next morning it was raining, He began her vocal training. 'But I can't sing in this weather'. 'Come, my dear-we'll sing together. (a) What training did the frog give the nightingale? Ans. The frog trained the nightingale to sing. (b) What was the effect of the training? Ans. As a result of the training, the nightingale lost her melodious voice and the creatures of the Bog lost interest in her. They no longer came to hear her sing (d) What was her protest? Ans. She could not sing in the rain. 20. Just put on your scarf and sash, Koo-oh-ah! ko-ash! ko-ash! ' So the frog and nightingale Journeyed up and down the scale For six hours, till she was shivering And her voice was hoarse and quivering. (a) Why did the frog tell the nightingale to put on her scarf and her sash? Ans. He wanted her to practise and as it was raining she was a little reluctant. (b) Explain; 'Journeyed up and down the scale'.
  • 13
    13 Ans. Sang a number of notes-both high and low notes. (c) What was the result of the practice on the nightingale? Ans. The frog made the nightingale practise in the rain for six hours. As a result she was shivering in the cold. Her throat became hoarse and her voice started shaking. 21. Though subdued and sleep-deprived, In the night her throat revived, And the sumac tree was bowed With a breathless, titled crowd: Owl of Sandwich, Duck of Kent, Mallard and Milady Trent, Martin Cardinal Mephisto, And the Coot of Monte Cristo. (a) Why was the nightingale subdued? Ans. She had no rest and she had been made to practise for long hours in the rain. (b) What made the nightingale's throat revive at night? Ans. The appreciative audience revived her throat. 9 (c) Explain: 'titled crowd'. Who was the noted critic? Ans. The 'title crowd' refers to the aristocratic creatures of the Bog. The frog was the noted critic. 22. Ladies with tiaras glittering In the interval sat twittering-
  • 14
    14 And the frog observed them glitter With a joy both sweet and bitter. (a) Where had all the animals gathered? Why? Ans. The animals had gathered near the sumac tree to hear the song of the nightingale. (b) Why was the frog's joy both sweet and bitter? Ans. The frog's joy was sweet as he was exploiting the nightingale and charging money from the creatures of the Bog who came to hear her, which he pocketed. At t he same time he was bitter because the creatures who came to hear the nightingale were the same ones who had insulted him when he used to sing. 23. 24. Every day the frog who'd sold her Songs for silver tried to scold her; 'You must practise even longer Till your voice, like mine, grows, stronger. (a) Who is 'her'? Ans. The nightingale. (b)How did the frog sell her songs for silver? Ans. The frog made the nightingale sing every night and he earned money by charging an admission fee from all the creatures who came to hear her song. (c) What did the frog till bird to do ? Ans. He told her to practise for longer hours till her voice became as strong as his own. He told her to puff up her lungs and sing with passion and add trills to her song. In the second song last night
  • 15
    15 You got nervous in mid-flight. And, my dear, lay on more trills: Audiences enjoy such frills. (a) Who speaks these lines and to whom? Ans. The frog speaks these lines to the nightingale. (b) What advice does the speaker give the listener? Ans. The frog advises the nightingale to add trills song-that is, to sing two musical notes one after the other, repeatedly and very quickly and to bring variety to her songs. (c) In what two ways was the speaker benefited by the training he gave? Ans. He earned a lot of money and was finally able to get rid of the nightingale. 25. You must make your public happier: Give them something sharper, snappier. We must aim for better billings You still owe me sixty shillings. (a) Who are the 'public'? Why was this advice given? Ans. The creatures who come to hear the nightingale sing are the public. The fog tells her to sing songs which have a faster beat to impress the public. (b) What is the meaning of 'better billings'? Ans. It means better publicity for the show. (c) What aspect of the speaker's personality is shown in these lines? Ans. The lines show his greed for money, his heartlessness, and ruthlessness. 26. Day by day the nightingale Grew more sorrowful and pale. Night on night her tired song Zipped and trilled and bounced along.
  • 16
    16 (a) Why did the nightingale become sorrowful and pale? Ans. The nightingale became sorrowful and pale as she had lost the beautiful quality of her voice and also her audience. (b) What was the result of the frog's training? Ans. Her song was no longer as melodious as it had been earlier and she lost her audience. (c) Explain: 'tired song'. Ans. The frog made her practise for long hours in al kinds of weather and scolded her. She was sleep-deprived and tired. This was reflected in her song. 27. Till the birds and beasts grew tired At a voice so uninspired And the ticket office gross Crashed, and she grew more morose- (a) Whose voice is being referred to here? What had happened to make it uninspired? Ans. The nightingale's voice is being referred to here. The frog had been training her and she had lost the natural sweetness of her voice. (b) What does 'ticket office gross' mean? Ans. The money collected as the sale of tickets for a concert or a show. (c) Why did it crash? Why did the nightingale grow morose? Ans. The creatures no longer came to hear the nightingale's song, so the collections fell. The lack of an audience and the frog's constant rebukes made her feel unhappy. 28. For her ears were now addicted. To applause quite unrestricted,
  • 17
    17 And to sing into the night All alone gave no delight. (a) What had the nightingale become used to? Ans. The nightingale became used to an appreciative audience who applauded her. (b) Why was she all alone? Ans. Her voice was no longer as melodious as it had been earlier and the creatures of the Bog no longer came to hear her sing. (c) What was the result of the lack of applause? Ans. The nightingale became sorrowful and pale. 29. Now the frog puffed up with rage. 'Brainless bird-you're on the stage- Use your wits and follow fashion, Puff your lungs out with your passion' (a) Why was the frog angry? Ans. The nightingale's voice no longer attracted the creatures of the Bog as earlier and his earnings dropped. (b)Do you think the bird is brainless? Why/why not? Ans. Yes, the bird was truly brainless. She believed the frog and came under his influence even though the other creatures appreciated her song and came to hear her sing in large numbers. Moreover, she had no proof of the frog's talent except for what he had himself said. (c) What did the nightingale do to please the frog? What happened to her a result? Ans. She puffed up her lungs to sing, burst a vein and died.
  • 18
    18 30. Trembling, terrified to fail, Blind with tears, the nightingale Heard him out in silence, tried, Puffed up, burst a vein, and died. (a) Why was the nightingale trembling? Ans. She was trembling because of the frog's scolding. (b) What did the frog wish the nightingale to do? Ans. He wanted her to use her wits and sing in a more fashionable style. (c) Whom is she terrified to fail? Ans. She was terrified to fail her audience who paid to hear she sing and the frog who was training her. 31. Said the frog: 'I tried to teach her, But she was a stupid creature- Far too nervous, far too tense. Far too prone to influence. (a) Whose influence did she come under? What was the effect of the influence? Ans. The nightingale came under the influence of the frog. She was completely controlled by him. He made her practise day and night in all sorts of weather. She lost the melody in her voice and her audience decreased. One day, as the frog scolded her and told her to puff up her lungs, she burst a vein and died. (b) What do you learn from the poem? Ans. That one should exercise one's individuality and reasoning without letting others lead one blindly. One should realize one's limitations and capabilities and not leave oneself open for exploitation.
  • 19
    19 32. Well, poor bird-she should have known That your song must be your own. That's why I sing with panache; 'Koo-oh-ah! ko-ash ! ko-ash! ' And the foghorn of the fog Blared unrivalled through the Bog. (a) Why does the frog call the nightingale 'poor bird'? Ans. She had died. (b) What did the frog think of his own influence on the nightingale? Ans. He realizes he was a bad influence on her. In the end, he confesses she should have realized her song should have been her own. (c) How did the frog gain by the nightingale's death? Ans. Once gain he was the unrivalled singer in the Bog. He had got rid of his competition. TEXTUAL QUESTIONS 1. How did the creatures of Bingle Bog react to the frog's singing? Ans. The creatures hated his voice; they threw sticks and stones at him, insulted him, complained about him but he continued to sing undeterred. 9 2. Which are the different ways in which the frog asserts his importance? Ans. The frog claims to be the owner of the sumac tree on which the nightingale was perched. He showed off his prowess as a singer by boasting about his splendid baritone for which he was acknowledged in Bingle Bog. He also claimed knowledge of music and said he was a critic with the Bog Trumpet. 3. Why is the frog's joy both sweet and bitter?
  • 20
    20 Ans. The frog's joy was sweet as he was earning a lot of money by charging the nightingale for training and it was bitter as the creatures who hated his voice and threw sicks and stones at him when the sang, paid to listen to the nightingale's song. 4. Why was the frog angry? Ans. As the creatures of the Bog lost interest in the nightingale's song. , the ticket money began to dip. Morose and depressed, the bird refused to sing, but the angry frog told her to puff out her lungs and sing louder. 5. How did the frog become the unrivalled king of the Bog again? Ans. When the bird tried to puff out her lungs and sing louder, she burst a vein, and died. Once again, the frog sang in the Bog without any competition. 6. Bring out the irony in the frog's statement-'Your song must be your own'. Ans. The irony in the statement is that the frog was the one who tried to teach the nightingale to sing differently. He did not let her song be her own. 7. Do you think the end is justified? Ans. Yes; the bird met a fitting end as she was truly brainless. She believed the frog and came under his influence even though the other creatures appreciated her song and came to hear her in large numbers. Moreover, she had no proof of the frog's talent except for what he himself said. No: the frog's statement-Well, poor bird-she should have known/That your song must 9 be your own indicates-shows that the frog deliberately set out to eliminate competition. He is therefore guilty of the bird's death. 8. Do you think the nightingale is 'brainless'? Give reasons for your answer. Ans. The nightingale was fooled by the frog. She took the frog at his word and followed him blindly and changed her song. She did not realize she had an appreciative audience even before the frog began to train her. She did not have the brains to realize the enormity of her talent.
  • 21
    21 9. Inspite of having a melodious voice and being a crowd puller, the nightingale turns out to be a loser and dies. How far is she responsible for her own downfall? Ans. The nightingale was fooled by the frog because she did not realize she had an appreciative audience even before the frog began to train her. She did not have the brains to realize the enormity of her talent even when the audience stopped coming to hear her sing. In fact, she was so under the frog's influence that she lost her life. 10.Do you agree with the frog's inference of the nightingale's character? Give reasons for your answer. Ans. Yes: asks the frog (who claims to be a music critic) his opinion of her song despite having an appreciative audience the previous night; does not show much faith in her own ability; gullible and easily influenced-listens to the frog and believers him despite having no proof of his talent. No: frog promised to train her; everyone wants to go better; audience begins to pay to hear her sing; ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS 1. Bring out the character of the frog. Ans. Frog has the following characteristics:- Thick shinned and impervious to insults:- Frog is a shameless creature he does not stop singing despite the creatures throwing stones sticks and bricks at him, begging him to stop singing, insulting chin and complaining about him. v/ Jealous : Frog gets jealous of the nightingale. He plots to get rid of her. v/ Presumptuous:- He is presumptuous by nature he offers to give training to the nightingale.
  • 22
    22 Possessive:- He says he owns the sumac tree. '/ Greedy:- He exploits the nightingale in order to earn more money. Dismissive:- He dismisses the nightingale as a stupid creatures who should not have come under his influence. 2. Bring out the character of Nightingale. Ans. Nightingale has the following characteristics:- Nervous:- She asks the frog his opinion of her song despite having an appreciative audience the previous night. Model:- She does not consider her song to be of much merit despite the applause. v/ Lack of confidence:- Despite having an appreciative audience she listens blindly to the frog. She does not show much faith in her own ability. v/ Easily influenced:- She listens to the frog and believes him despite having no proof of his talent. 3. To some extent the nightingale was herself responsible for her downfall and death comment. Ans. The nightingale was herself responsible for her downfall and death it is clear from the following points. She carried away by appreciation she could not guess she was being fooled by the frog. v/ She greed to gain recognition and fame left her open to exploitation. She felt honoured to be singled out by the frog for appreciation and recognition-she did not see through him. She despite having an appreciative audience she did not have much faith in her own abilities. v/ She did not have the brains to realize the enormity of her talent even when the audience stopped coming. 4. What is the moral of the poem?
  • 23
    23 Ans. Value points: v/ One must not trust anyone blindly. Have faith in one's own abilities. Ambition and greed to gain recognition leaves one open to exploitation. 9

Discussion

Copyright Infringement: All the contents displayed here are being uploaded by our members. If an user uploaded your copyrighted material to LearnPick without your permission, please submit a Takedown Request for removal.

Need a Tutor or Coaching Class?

Post an enquiry and get instant responses from qualified and experienced tutors.

Post Requirement

Related Notes

Query submitted.

Thank you!

Drop Us a Query:

Drop Us a Query