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CLASS 1OTH CBSE ENGLISH NOTES

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POEM 6TH :- SNAKE POEM 1ST :- THE FROG AND THE NIGHTINGLE

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    By : Poetry-6 SUMMARY 1 "SNAKE" - D.H. Lawrence ENGLISH In this poem, the poet describes his encounter in detail with the snake that had come to drink water from his water-through on a hot day He also reveals his responses towards the presence of the snake at his water-trough. A snake visited the poet's water-trough on a hoes fternoo to quench his thirst. The poet who had also gone to the trough to fill water In pitcher, waited for the snake since he had come at the trough prior o the oet. The snak came out from the crack and trailed over the edge of the stone-trough. He rested hi throat upon the stone bottom and sipped the water into his slac long body After drinking water, e raised his head just like cattle do and flashed his forked tongue. He though fora oment and then bent down to drink some more water. The poe Observe everything carefully Education and social conventions made the poem think tha the gol en rown poisonous,e nake must be killed and that as a brave an he mus undertake h task of Jing the snake. He thought so because golden snakes were venomous He felt he must pick up a stick and finish him off. However, the poet instinctively began to like the snake and treated him like a guest and felt honoured that he had come to drink at this water trough. He questioned himself and wondered whethe his not daring to kill the snake proved that he was a coward and whether his esire to talk to the snake reflected his perversity. The voices of education inside the poet told him that it was the feat of the snake that made him refrain from killing him. However, the poet felt that though he was quite afraid of the snake, he did actually feel honoured that a snake had come to seek his hospitality from the deep recesses of the earth.
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    2 After drinking water to his satisfaction, the snake raised his head dreamily and flickered his forked tongue and licked his lips. The snake looked around like a God and then slowly proceeded to curve round and move away from the water trough. As the snake put his head into the hole to retreat into the earth, the poet was filled with a protest against the idea of the snake withdrawing into the hole. The poet put down his pitcher, picked up a log and hurled it at the snake. The snake twisted violently and with great alacrity vanished into the hole in the wall. The poet instantly regretted for his unrefined and contemptible act and cursed the voices of education and civilization that had shåpe his thou ht processes and urged him to kill the snake. At that point the poet felt like lhe ancient mariner who had killed the albatross for no reason. He wished that the nake would come bac He thought of the snake as a king in exile who a to be crowned also regretted having missed his opportunity of kno ing and understanding one of the lords of life. The poet was guilt-ridden nd felt that h had to atone for the meanness of throwing a log at the snake. Textual Questions 1. Why does th poet decide to stand and wait till the snake has drinking? hat does this tell you abou the poet? finished Ans. The sna visits the poet's wa er-trough on a hot afternoon to quench his thirst. The poet also goes to the trough to fill water in a pitcher. But the poet decides to stand and wait since the snakeyas come there prior to the poet. It reveals that the poet has an accommodating and sympathetic nature. 2. In stanzas 2 and 3, the poet gives a vivid description of the snake by using suggestive expressions. What picture of the snake do you form on the basis of this description? Ans. The snake with his yellow brown belly trailed over the edge of the stone trough. He rested his throat upon the stone bottom and sipped the water into his slack long
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    3 body. After drinking water, he raised his head just like cattle and flashed his forked tongue. 3. How does the poet describe the day and the atmosphere when he saw the snake? Ans. It was a very hot day. But there was a red flowered tree which had a strange- scented shade. So though the atmosphere on that day was hot, the shad of the tree was a saving grace. 4. What does the poet want to convey by saving that the snake emerges from the 'burning bowels of the earth? Ans. The poet wants to convey that the snake who dwells beneat the earth comes out from the bottom of earth through the hole. 5. Do you think that the snake was conscious of the oet's presence? How do you know? Ans. Yes, the snake was conscious of the poet s presence. We come to know this from the fact that the snake lifted IS head and loc ed at the poet vaguely, as drinking cattle do. 6. How do we know that the snakes' thirst •was satiated? Pick out the expressions that conve this. Ans. (1) He i ped with hi straight mouth oftly drank through his straight gums, into his slack long body silentl . (2) And stopped and drank a little more. 7. The pet has a dual attitude towards the snake. Why does he experience conflicting emotions on seeing the snake? Ans. The poet experiences conflicting emotions on seeing the snake because he is under the influence of education and civilization that have shaped this thought processes. Instinctively, he begins to like the snake and treats him like a guest who has come to drink water at his trough. But rationally, he thinks that he should kill the snake. So he hurls a log at the snake.
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    4 8. The poet is filled with horror and protest when the snake prepare to retreat and hurry itself in the 'horrid black', 'dreadful' hole. In the light of this statement, bring out the irony of his act of throwing a log at the snake. Ans. Instinctively, the poet likes the snake and treats him like a guest and feels honoured that he has come to drink water at his water-trough. So he protests when the snakes prepares to withdraw into his hole. But rationally, he thinks that he should kill the snake. So he throws a log at the snake to kill him. The poet instantly regrets his mean action. The irony lies in the fact that he likes the snakes and treats him like a guest and ye€tries to kill him. 9. The pet seems to be full of admiration and rest for the snake. He almost regards his like a majestic god. Pick out at least four expressions from the poem that reflect these emotions. Ans. (1) But must I confess how liked im. (2) How glad I was he had com like a guest. (3) And looked around like a god (4) One of the lords of lif 10. What is the difference between the snake's movement at the beginning of the poem and later when the poet strikes it with a log of wood? You may use relevant vocabulary from the poem to highlight the difference. Ans. At the beginmng of the poem the snake trailed over the edge of the stone trough and rested his throat upon the stone bottom. Later on when the poet struck the snake with a log of wood, he twisted violently and quickly vanished into the ole in the wall. 11. The poet experiences feelings of self-derision, guilt and regret after hitting the snake. Pick out expressions that suggest this. Why does he feel like this? Ans. (1) And immediately I regretted it. (2) I thought how paltry, how vulgar, what a mean act! (3) I despised myself.
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    5 He fells guilty because he tried to kill the snake without any reason. 12. You have already read Coleridge's poem "The Ancient Mariner' in which an albatross is killed by the mariner. Why does the poet make an allusion to the albatross? Ans. The mariner in Coleridge's poem had killed the albatross for no reason and later on regretted his action. The poet here also tries to kill the snake for no reason and therefore regrets his mean act. So the poet makes an allusion to the albatross. 13. "I have something to explain". Explain. Ans. The poet hurried a log of wood on the snak&to kill him. H immediately regretted his mean act. He was guilt-ridden and felt hat he ad to atone or the meanness of throwing a log at the snake. Additional Questions 1. Where did the snake go and why? Ans. The snake ent to the poet's water- ugh t •nk water. 2. How did the sna e quench his thirst? e nake rested his, hroat on the stone bottom and sipped water with his Ans. straight mouth. e quenched hi thirst by drinking through his straight gums into his slack long body 3. What did th voice of education tell the poet? Ans. The voice of education directed the poet to kill the snake. He knew that the golden snakes were venomous and so they must be killed. And this snake was of golden colour. 4. What was the instinctive approach of the poet towards the snake? Ans. Instinctively, the poet liked the snake and treated him like a guest. The poet also tried to kill the snake without any reason. He thinks that his act is similar to that of the mariner. So he makes reference to the albatross.
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    6 5. Why does the poet make reference to the albatross? Ans. The mariner had killed the albatross without any reason. The poet also tried to kill the snake without any reason. He thinks that his act is similar to that of the mariner. So he makes reference to the albatross. 6. What did the poet wish? Ans. The poet wished that the snake would come back agam 7. How did the poet fell at the end of the poem9 Ans. The poet felt guilt-ridden and repentant-He regrette he meanness of his action of throwing a log at the snake. Reference to context Read the extracts given below and answer the following questions by choosing the most appropriate options: 1. i. (a) (c) ii. (a) "A snake came to m water-trough On a hot, hot dab and I m pyjamas for the heat, To drink there, In the deep, strange-scented sha e of the great dark carob tree I came down the steps with my pitcher And must wait, must stand and wait, For there he was at the trough before me." The poet went to his water-trough to Drink water escape the heat of the day (b) see the snake (d) if his pitcher with water. The snake visited the water-trough on a hot day to rest under a tree near the water-trough (b) hide himself behind the trough
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    (c) drink water at the water-trough 7 (d) escape the presence of the poet. iii. What figure of speech does the poet use in the sixth line? (a)simile (c) repetition Ans. (i) (d) (ii) (c) (b) image (d) alliteration (lii (c) 2. i. He sipped with his straight mouth Softly drank through his straight Gums, into his slack long body Silently, Someone was before me at my water trough, And I, like a second comer, waiting. The snake drank the water (a)gently (c) softly (b) silently d) hurriedl ii. The literary device used b the poet in the first line is b) alli eration (a)simi e (c) metaphor d)yomatopoeia iii. 'Someone' in the fifth line refers to the (a)snake (b) poet (c)trough (d) tree Ans. (i) C 3. (ii) B (iii) A He lifted his head from his drinking, as cattle do And looked at me vaguely, as drinking cattle do And flickered his two-forked tongue
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    8 From his lips, and mused a moment And stopped and dark a little more What literary device does the poet use in the first line? i. (a) Image Alliteration ii. The snake looked at the poet (a) silently (c) vaguely iii. Before drinking a little more water, the snake (a)mused (c) mused and stopped Ans. (i) B (ii) C (b) simile (d) metaphor (b) stealthily (d) carefully (b) stooped d hissed forward (iii) C SUPPLY-TYPE QUESTIONS Read the following extracts and answer the given questions: 1. i. ii. iii. The voice of my education said to me He must be killed For in icily the lac , black snakes are Innocent, the gold are venomous And voices in me said, If you were a man You would take a stick and break him now, And finish him off. the What told the poet to kill the snake? It was his education that told the poet to kill the snake. In Sicily, what colour are venomous snakes? In Sicily, venomous snakes are of golden colour. What literary device does the poet use in the third line? The ship is now moving towards north.
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    2. i. ii. iii. 3. i. ii. iii. 9 But I must confess how I liked him How glad I was he had come like a guest In quiet, to drink at my water trough And depart peaceful, pacified and thankless Into the burning bowels of his earth? How did the poet treat the snake? The poet treated the snake as a guest. What figure of speech does the poet use in the third line? It is alliteration. What does 'the burning bowels of this earth' mean? It means the bottom f the earth. And truly I was afraid, I was most afraid But even so, honoured still ore That he would seek my hospitality From out the dark door of the secret earth. What IS the figure of speech used in the first line? It is repetition. Why did the poet feel honoured? The poet felt honoured because the snake had come to seek his hospitality. What does 'the dark door of the secret earth' mean? It means the bottom of the earth.

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