ILCC

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Overview:

ILCC is an academic hub which not only provides academic support in the learning process but also a holistic approach in the all-round development of the child/ learner. At ILCC students not only get an academic solution to their difficulties in their curriculum/ syllabus but also get proper career guidance. Thus, ILCC provides a platform at which students can learn in a secure and friendly atmosphere. Apart from the academic support, we also deliver a number of verticals such as career counselling, career planning, psychometric testing, abroad education trips and admission selection and support to foreign universities. Therefore, ILCC is a one-stop student solution for all academic-related requirements.

Courses:

Mathematics, Physics, English, History, Geography, Accountancy, Chemistry, Economics, Hindi, Biology, EVS, Science, Commerce Subjects, Vedic Maths, Social Studies, Algebra, Business Mathematics, Costing, Education, Physiology, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Zoology, Statistics, Business Studies, Business Organisation, Logic, Arts Group, KVPY Exam, GATE Exam, IIT JEE Mains, CET, WBJEE, Architecture, JECA Exam, AMIE, BITSAT, AIEEE, MCA Entrance, BCA Entrance, JEXPO, Polytechnic Entrance, IIT JAM, NATA Exam, AMITE, IIT JEE Advanced, TOEFL, Public Speaking, IELTS, Spoken English, Effective Communication, Corporate Communication, Business English, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Electronics, Instrumentation, Mechanical, Production, IT, Drawing, Mechanics, Engineering Graphics, Forex Trading, MBA Entrance, Management Subjects, BBA Subjects, BBA Entrance, BHA, BTTM, MTTM, Bachelor of Hospital Administration (BHA), CA - CPT, Direct Tax Laws, CA - IPCC, CS - Foundation, CMA-CPA-ACCA-CIMA, CFA, CA - Final, ICWA & ICWAI, CS - Executive, ACCA, CIMA Certification, CFP, CPFA, CS Professional, CMA Foundation, CMA Intermediate, CMA Final, CA Foundation, CA Intermediate, GRE, GMAT, SAT, Study in USA, Study in UK, Study in Australia, Study in Canada, Study in Germany, Study in France, Study in China, Study in Singapore, Study in Norway, Study in Europe, ACT Exam, PTE, Study in New Zealand, Study in Ireland, Study in Switzerland, Study in Dubai, OET, USMLE, NCLEX, NBDE, FMS, PSAT, NMSQT, TOEIC, SOP Writing, All Subjects, UPSC Exam, SSC Exams, Defence Exams, Insurance Exams, Railways Exams, IES Exam, School Service Commission, IAS Preparation, IBPS, Bank PO, SBI Exam, RBI Exam, WBCS, CSAT, AFCAT, EPFO, Forest Department Exam, Police Department Exam, EAMCET, CTET, DMRC Entrance, MPPSC, NDA, LIC, GIC, PSU Exam, UGC Exams, Sub-Inspector Exam, NTT, PTT, NPTT, GPSC

Specialities:

In the Institute for Learning and Career Counseling (ILCC) we are educationists. We closely monitor and understand the needs, strengths and weaknesses of our students. Hence, creating a customized way of guiding a child, suitable to their needs and understanding, making it easier for the child to understand. We evaluate our students and give a detailed report on their aptitudes and interests so that students can gain clarity on their choices. This is much needed and better for students to take advice from trained and informed professionals than from inexperienced sources.

Segment & Subject Details:
Class 9 - 10 Mathematics Physics English History Geography Accountancy Chemistry Economics Hindi Biology EVS Science Commerce Subjects Vedic Maths Social Studies Algebra
Class 11 - 12 Mathematics Physics English History Geography Accountancy Business Mathematics Chemistry Costing Economics Education Hindi Physiology Political Science Psychology Sociology Zoology Biology Statistics EVS Business Studies Commerce Subjects Business Organisation Logic Algebra Arts Group KVPY Exam
Engineering Entrance & IITJEE Mathematics Physics Chemistry GATE Exam IIT JEE Mains CET WBJEE Architecture JECA Exam AMIE BITSAT AIEEE MCA Entrance BCA Entrance JEXPO Polytechnic Entrance IIT JAM NATA Exam AMITE IIT JEE Advanced
English Speaking TOEFL Public Speaking IELTS Spoken English Effective Communication Corporate Communication Business English
Engineering Subjects Mathematics Chemical Civil Computer Electrical Electronics Instrumentation Mechanical Production IT Drawing Mechanics Engineering Graphics
MBA & BBA Forex Trading MBA Entrance Management Subjects BBA Subjects BBA Entrance BHA BTTM MTTM Bachelor of Hospital Administration (BHA)
CA CPT CA - CPT Direct Tax Laws CA - IPCC CS - Foundation CMA-CPA-ACCA-CIMA CFA CA - Final ICWA & ICWAI CS - Executive ACCA CIMA Certification CFP CPFA CS Professional CMA Foundation CMA Intermediate CMA Final CA Foundation CA Intermediate
Study Abroad GRE GMAT TOEFL IELTS SAT Study in USA Study in UK Study in Australia Study in Canada Study in Germany Study in France Study in China Study in Singapore Study in Norway Study in Europe ACT Exam PTE Study in New Zealand Study in Ireland Study in Switzerland Study in Dubai OET USMLE NCLEX NBDE FMS PSAT NMSQT TOEIC SOP Writing
Class 6 - 8 Mathematics Physics English History Geography Accountancy Chemistry Economics Hindi Biology EVS Science All Subjects Commerce Subjects Social Studies Algebra
Competitive Exams UPSC Exam SSC Exams Defence Exams Insurance Exams Railways Exams IES Exam School Service Commission IAS Preparation IBPS Bank PO SBI Exam RBI Exam WBCS CSAT AFCAT EPFO Forest Department Exam Police Department Exam KVPY Exam EAMCET CTET DMRC Entrance MPPSC NDA LIC GIC PSU Exam UGC Exams Sub-Inspector Exam NTT PTT NPTT GPSC
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6 Local classes available

  • Answer:

    Minimum  364.6nm, Maximum -656.3nm in air

  • Question: What is redressal?

    Posted in: Social Studies | Date: 26/12/2018

    Answer:

    Redressal is act of correcting an error or a fault , Its remedy, remediation. For example paying a compension for an act for which you are responsible. 

     

  • Question: Is net price with or without VAT?

    Posted in: Accountancy | Date: 26/12/2018

    Answer:

    Net price is inclusive of VAT as the same is added while calculating total cost. 

  • Question: What is CA Foundation?

    Posted in: CA Foundation | Date: 02/01/2019

    Answer:

    CA FOUNDATION earlier known as CPT  is the entry level test for student wanted to persue CA after class XII. 

     

     

     

  • Question: Human being belongs to the species of 

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 02/01/2019

    Answer:

    C - Homo Sapiens

  • Question: What is pollination?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Pollination is a process of transferring of pollen grains from the anther to the stigma of same flower or different flowers by different agents such as insects, birds other animals, wind, etc

  • Question: What do you mean by osmosis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Movement of a solvent such as water through a selectively permeable or semipermeable membrane from the region of low solute concentration to a solution of higher solute concentration till the concentration of two solutes becomes equal.

  • Question: What is pyorrhoea?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Pyorrhoea is a dental or disease of teeth in which the ligaments and bones that support the teeth become inflamed and infected.

  • Question: Why is Neurospora used as genetic material?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Neurospora is a member of Kingdom Fungi. This fungus is used as a genetic material because its life cycle is short and can be grown easily. Dominant and recessive characters are easily expressed in it and the products of meiosis are arranged in a linear way.

  • Question: Human being belongs to the species of 

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    C - Homo sapiens

  • Answer:

    Correct answer is 'B'

    Oxygen increases due to increase in the carbon dioxide through sodium bicarbonate.

  • Answer:

    The correct answer is 'C'

    In C4 plant are rich in PEP carboxylase.

  • Question: What are Monotremes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Movement of a solvent such as water through a selectively permeable or semipermeable membrane from the region of low solute concentration to a solution of higher solute concentration till the concentration of two solutes becomes equal.

  • Question: What are Pssamophytes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Pollination is a process of transferring of pollen grains from the anther to the stigma of same flower or different flowers by different agents such as insects, birds other animals, wind, etc.

  • Question: What is function of Prothrombin?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Prothrombin or factor II is a vitamin K dependent single chain glycoprotein which is involved in blood clotting. It is activated by prothrombinase that converts prothrombin to thrombin. Thrombin acts as a serine protease that converts fibrinogen into fibrin which forms a clot.

  • Question: What are Pssamophytes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    The xerophytes which are gown on the sand and gravels of the desert are called psammophytes.

  • Question: What are Monotremes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    The word 'monotreme' refers to their common rear opening, the cloaca. Monotremes are a group of mammals which lay eggs, but they also feed their babies with milk.

  • Question: What are viriods?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Viroids are smallest known infectious agents that consists solely of a single strand of RNA and cause disease in certain plants. They lack protein coat.

  • Question: What is ptyalin?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Ptyalin is an enzyme secreted by salivary glands. It is also known as salivary amylase. It acts on starch to converts into maltose and dextrin.

  • Question: What are Tyloses?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Tyloses are balloon-like structures formed when part of the protoplast of a parenchyma cell bulges out through a pit pair into the lumen of an adjoining cell. Tyloses are common in xylem vessels of trees such as Populus, Rhus, Robinia, etc.

  • Question: What is P protein? Where is it found?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Phloem-specific proteins or P proteins are the proteins are particularly useful markers to investigate long-distance trafficking of macromolecules in plants. These are found in the phloem.

  • Question: Which plant is used to make hockey bats?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Hockey sticks are made from either hardwood or laminate wood. Maple, birch, aspen, are usually the type of wood used. Sometimes, more than one type of wood is used to make a single stick.

  • Question: What is the octet rule in chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    The octet rule is a chemical rule of thumb that reflects observation that atoms of main-group elements tend to combine in such a way that each atom has eight electrons in its valence shell, giving it the same electron configuration as a noble gas.

  • Question: What is organic chemistry ?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    The branch of chemistry that deals with carbon compounds (other than simple salts such as carbonates, oxides, and carbides).

  • Question: What is the meaning of thermodynamics in chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Chemical thermodynamics is the study of the interrelation of heat and work with chemical reactions or with physical changes of state within the confines of the laws of thermodynamics. Chemical thermodynamics involves not only laboratory measurements of various thermodynamic properties, but also the application of mathematical methods to the study of chemical questions and the spontaneity of processes.

  • Question: What is an example of a physical change in chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Melting of ice and crushing of bottles

  • Question: What is stereochemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 08/01/2019

    Answer:

    Stereochemistry, a subdiscipline of chemistry, involves the study of the relative spatial arrangement of atoms that form the structure of molecules and their manipulation. The study of stereochemistry focuses on stereoisomers, which by definition have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms (constitution), but differ in the three-dimensional orientations of their atoms in space. For this reason, it is also known as 3D chemistry—the prefix "stereo-" means "three-dimensionality".

  • Question: What is protein in Chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Proteins are large, complex molecules that are critical for the normal functioning of the human body. They are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body’s tissues and organs. Proteins are made up of hundreds of smaller units called amino acids that are attached to one another by peptide bonds, forming a long chain. You can think of a protein as a string of beads where each bead is an amino acid.

  • Question: What is some importance of organic chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Organic chemistry is important because it is the study of life and all of the chemical reactions related to life. Several careers apply an understanding of organic chemistry, such as doctors, veterinarians, dentists, pharmacologists, chemical engineers, and chemists.

    This vast list of substance we use daily indicates the importance of organic chemistry. So it is considered as a separate branch for study in chemistry.

    Medicine:- Drugs to cure disease

    b) Pathophysiology of the diseases

                     c) To diagnose the disease

            2. Food:- Food materials are solely made of carbon compounds viz. carbohydrates (CHO), proteins (NH2-CH-COOH), and fats (CH-COO-CH). Even vitamins are organic in nature.

            3. Cleansing agents:-  In industries and labs, organic solvents are widely used to clear of impurities. For example in drug extraction from plants, the fatty matter from the pulp is removed using petroleum ether. Thus organic chemistry through its knowledge of polarity, solubility, partition factors uses solvents to separate components for better use.

            4 Sterilizing agents1:-  Most of the sterilizing agents and disinfectants like phenol, formaldehyde etc are carbon compounds. Due to their properties like solubility, pH they can kill microbes and even human body cells.

    These kill the bacteria and other microbes due to either dissolving the microbe cell wall or damaging the protein layer etc. Their efficiency is enhanced by making small tweaks in the chemistry.

     

            5. Analytic substances:-  Most substances we use like drugs, pesticides, etc., are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using different types of titrations, chromatography techniques, and spectrophotometry.  Here the reagent use like acids or bases or reductive oxidative species is organic in nature. Further, the endpoint indicators in titration are developed by organic chemistry.

            6. Valuables:-  Diamonds, graphite, petroleum. Interestingly the carbon compounds are found to be highly valuable, durable and hardest in the world.

    Diamond and graphite are both pure carbon alone compound without any other elements inside. They are both highly used and expensive. Their properties are studies in organic chemistry. Petroleum is the other most valued resources on the earth for fuels needs in the world. These petroleum products are further diversified for various uses. And petroleum is one of the factors which influence the world economy.

  • Question: What is Pointage in Chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemical | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

             The no. of points accumulated or required.

           e.g:-     The Pointage is defined as number of milli-litres of 0.1 N NaOH required to neutralize ten millilitre of bath solution

  • Answer:

    Uphill speed = 10Km/h

    Downhill speed = 36Km/h    

    Let distance = x

    Average speed = total distance /time

                               = (x+x)/(x/10 + x/36) = 15.65 m/s

  • Question: How is the polar star located in the sky?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Pole star is an unusually bright star that appears North in the sky and is aligned to the axis of rotation of Earth.  

    It is referred to as Polaris or Alpha Ursae Minoris in astronomy and is a star that is prominently used in celestial navigation. During the medieval times, the Pole star or Polaris was known by the name ‘Stella Maris’ which meant ‘Star of the Sea’ as it was used extensively for navigation at sea.

  • Question: If p= +2.0 how do we find f?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Power = 1/ focal length

          F=1/p = ½= 0.5m

  • Question: What is popoff's rule in organic chemistry?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Popoff's rule states that during oxidation of ketones, keto group always stays with the smaller alkyl group. For example, CH3CH2COCH2CH2CH3 on oxidation with HNO3 gives two moles of propanoic acid, where in one mole of propanoic acid the cooh group comes from CH2 of propyl part of ketone.

  • Question: Define double bond stereochemistry.

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    It is an extension of cis–trans isomer notation (which only describes relative stereochemistry) that can be used to describe double bonds having two, three or four substituents. Following the Cahn–Ingold–Prelog priority rules (CIP rules), each substituent on a double bond is assigned a priority.

     

    EZ configuration, or the EZ convention, is the IUPAC preferred method of describing the absolute stereochemistry of double bonds in organic chemistry. It is an extension of cis–trans isomer notation (which only describes relative stereochemistry) that can be used to describe double bonds having two, three or four substituents.

    Following the Cahn–Ingold–Prelog priority rules (CIP rules), each substituent on a double bond is assigned a priority.

    If the two groups of higher priority are on opposite sides of the double bond, the bond is assigned the configuration E (from entgegen, German: [ɛntˈɡeːɡən], the German word for "opposite").

    If the two groups of higher priority are on the same side of the double bond, the bond is assigned the configuration Z (from zusammen, German: [tsuˈzamən], the German word for "together").

     

         

     

    (E)-But-2-ene

         

    (Z)-But-2-ene

  • Answer:

    This is a chemical test to detect chloride ions in the qualitative analysis. Any chloride salt,such as NaCl,when heated with acidified potassium dichromate, orange red fumes of chromyl chloride are given out. This confirms the presence of chloride ions.

     

  • Question: What is microbiology?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Microbiology is the study of micro-organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, archaea, fungi and protozoa. It includes study on their biochemistry, physiology, cell biology, ecology, evolution and clinical aspects.

  • Question: What is the recognition sequence for Ecori?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    EcoRI is a restriction enzyme. It creates 4 nucleotide sticky ends with 5' end overhangs of AATT. The nucleic acid recognition sequence where the enzyme cuts is G/AATTC, which has a palindromic, complementary sequence of CTTAA/G. 

  • Question: What is an achlamydous flower?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    A flower is called achlamydous, when neither of accessory whorls are present. Thus, in achlamydous flower calyx and corolla are absent.

  • Question: What is epiblast?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    The epiblast is the outer layer of a young embryo before the segregation of the germ layers. It is capable of becoming the ectoderm and containing cells that becomes the mesoderm and endoderm. 

  • Question: What is Quiscent center?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Quiescent centre is a region in the apical meristem of a root. At this centre cells divide very slowly or not at all, but the cells are capable of resuming meristematic activity.  

  • Question: What is pneumonia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Pneumonia is an infection of lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus (purulent material), causing cough with phlegm or pus, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing. A variety of organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia.

  • Question: What is tidal volume?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    Tidal Volume (TV) is the amount of air inhaled by a person in one breath. It is normally 500 ml of air at rest

  • Question: What is Egestion?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 09/01/2019

    Answer:

    The undigested food is stored in the rectum, the lower part of the large intestine. The undigested part of food is called faeces. This process of removal of faeces is called egestion. 

  • Question: What is Endocytosis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Endocytosis is the process of actively transporting molecules into the cell by engulfing it with its membrane. Endocytosis and exocytosis are used by all cells to transport molecules that cannot pass through the membrane passively

  • Question: What is tonoplast?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Membrane that bound vacuoles in the plants is called tonoplast.

  • Question: What are cytoplasmic inclusions?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are variety of intracellular non-living substances that are not able to carry out any metabolic activity. They are not bound by membranes and they are stored nutrients, secretory products, and pigment granules.

  • Question: What is osmotic pressure?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Osmotic pressure is a hydrostatic pressure which stops the process of osmosis

  • Question: What is deplasmolysis of plant cells?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Deplamolysis is the process of begging of movement of water in the plasmolysed (shrunken) cell.

  • Question: What is cyclosis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Cyclosis is a process in which streaming of cytoplasm occurs.  Cyslosis occures in Paramoesium.

  • Answer:

    Answer is 'A' CO and N2 have same diffusion rate at same temprature and pressure

  • Question: Which one is more acidic phenol or water?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    Phenol is more acidic

  • Question: Which is more acidic water or alcohol?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 10/01/2019

    Answer:

    water

  • Question: Are Non-inflammable and flammable same in meaning?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    No flammable and flammable doesn’t have same meaning. There is no difference between flammable and inflammable. Inflammable is not the opposite of flammable as some people think. When you say that something in flammable or inflammable, what you mean is that it is something that can easily catch fire. 

  • Question: How does formaldehyde reacts with tollen's reagent?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Tollen’s reagent is an ammonical solution of Silver nitrate. When aldehyde is added to tollen’s reagent, Ag2O is reduced to silver which deposits as black ppt. or silver mirror.

    -CHO + Ag2O—-> -COOH + 2Ag (silver mirror)

    HCHO + Ag2O—-> HCOOH + 2Ag (silver mirror)

  • Question: Abnormal behavior of fluorin gas

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Fluorine differs from rest of the elements of its family due to

     (i) its small size

     (ii) highest electronegativity 

     (iii) low bond dissociation energy

     (iv) absence of d-orbitals in the valence shell.

    The main points of difference are:

    (1) Fluorine is most reactive of all the halogens due to lower value of F — F bond dissociation energy (F2 = 158, Cl2 = 243, bromine = 192 and iodine = 151 kJ mol–1).

    (2) Being the most electronegative element, it shows only an oxidation state of –1 and does not show positive oxidation states due to absence of d-orbitals in its valence shell. Other halogens show positive oxidation states of +1, +3, +5 and +7.

    (3) Due to small atomic size and high electronegativity of H, HF undergoes strong H-bonding while other halogen acids do not. As a result,

        (i) HF is a liquid (boiling point 292.5K), while other halogen acids are gases at room   temperature (boiling point of HCl = 189 K, HBr = 206 K, HI = 238 K).

        (ii) HF is weakest of all the halogen acids due to high strength of H — F bond.

        (iii) Due to H-bonding, HF can form acid salts of the type KHF2, i.e., K+[H – F ... F–] while HCl,   HBr and HI do not form such salts (i.e., no KHCl, KHBr2 and KHl2 are known).

    (4) Fluorides have the maximum ionic character. For example AlF3 is ionic while other halides of are covalent.

    (5) Of all the halogens, fluorine has the highest positive electrode potential (F2 = 2.87, Cl2 = 1.36, Br2 = 1.09 and 12 = 0.53 volt) i.e., it is most easily reduced and hence acts as the strongest oxidising agent. It brings about the highest oxidation of other elements with which it combines. For example with S, it gives SF6, with I2 it gives IF1. Other halogens do not always bring about the highest oxidation state. For example, with sulphur gives Cl2 gives SCl4, Br2 while SBr2 does I2 not react at all. F2 is so powerful oxidising agent that it can even oxidise inert-gases.

    (6) HF cannot be stored in glass bottles since it reacts with silicates to form fluorosilicates.

                     Na2SiO3 + 6 HF ———> Na2SiF6 + 3 H2O

    While other halogen acids (HCl, HBr and HI) do not react with silicates and hence can be stored in glass bottles.

    (7) AgF is soluble in H2O while all other silver halides i.e., AgCl, AgBr and Agl are insoluble in water. In constant, CaF2 is insoluble while other calcium halides i.e., CaCl2, CaBr2, Cal2 are soluble inH2O.

    (8) Due to absence of -orbitals, fluorine, does not form polyhalide ions while other halogens form polyhalides of the type I3–, Br3–, I5– etc

  • Answer:

    Bromine is the non-metal which is liquid at room temp.

    Metal having high melting point is Tungsten

  • Answer:

    Bromine is the non-metal which is liquid at room temp.

    Metal having high melting point is Tungsten

  • Answer:

    Bromine is the non-metal which is liquid at room temp.

    Metal having high melting point is Tungsten

  • Question: What is granite used for?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Granite is used in buildings, bridges, paving, monuments, and many other exterior projects. Indoors, polished granite slabs and tiles are used in countertops, tile floors, stair treads and many other design elements. Granite is a prestige material, used in projects to produce impressions of elegance and quality. Some interesting and common uses of granite are shown in the photo collection below.

  • Question: Why is acetic acid is a weak acid?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    A strong acid is one that completely ionizes or dissociates in a solution ,provided there is sufficient solvent. In contrast, a weak acid only partially dissociates. Acids like acetic acid ( CH3COOH ) dissociates partially or incompletely, releasing only some of its hydrogen atoms into the solution.

    It ionizes to a small extent in water to form a low concentration of H+ ions (or H3O+) in solution.

    In the reversible chemical equation,

    CH3COOH→H+( aq)+CH3COO- (aq) the equilibrium lies far to the left and hence the Ka value is very small.

  • Question: What are isotones?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Isotones,  any of two or more species of atoms or nuclei that have the same number of neutrons. Thus, chlorine-37 and potassium-39 are isotones, because the nucleus of this species of chlorine consists of 17 protons and 20 neutrons, whereas the nucleus of this species of potassium contains 19 protons and 20 neutrons.

  • Question: what is zwitter ion?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    An amino acid has both a basic amine group and an acidic carboxylic acid group.

     

    There is an internal transfer of a hydrogen ion from the -COOH group to the -NH2 group to leave an ion with both a negative charge and a positive charge.

    This is called a zwitterion.

     

    This is the form that amino acids exist in even in the solid state. If you dissolve the amino acid in water, a simple solution also contains this ion.

    A zwitterion is a compound with no overall electrical charge, but which contains separate parts which are positively and negatively charged.

  • Answer:

    The simplest organic molecule is methane, CH4, which contains one carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms. Methane is a saturated hydrocarbon. Saturated hydrocarbons are hydrocarbons that contain no rings and contain only single bonds between the different atoms.Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon because it contains only one carbon atom.

  • Question: What are minimum boiling azeotrope

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    An azeotrope or a constant boiling point mixture is a mixture of two or more liquids whose proportions cannot be altered or changed by simple distillation. This happens because when an azeotrope is boiled, the vapour has the same proportions of constituents as the unboiled mixture.

    There are two types of azeotropes: minimum boiling azeotrope and maximum boiling azeotrope.

    A solution that shows greater positive deviation from Raoult's law forms a minimum boiling azeotrope at a specific composition. For example, an ethanol-water mixture (obtained by fermentation of sugars) on fractional distillation yields a solution containing approximately 95% by volume of ethanol. Once this composition has been achieved, the liquid and vapour have the same composition, and no further separation occurs. A solution that shows large negative deviation from Raoult's law forms a maximum boiling azeotrope at a specific composition. Nitric acidand water is an example of this class of azeotrope. This azeotrope has an approximate composition of 68% nitric acid and 32% water by mass, with a boiling point of 393.5 K (120.4 °C).

  • Question: Hydrugen bonding

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    A hydrogen bond is a partially electrostatic attraction between a hydrogen (H) atom which is bound to a more electronegative atom or group, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), or fluorine (F)—the hydrogen bond donor—and another adjacent atom bearing a lone pair of electrons—the hydrogen bond acceptor.

    Hydrogen bonds can be intermolecular (occurring between separate molecules) or intramolecular (occurring among parts of the same molecule). Depending on the nature of the donor and acceptor atoms which constitute the bond, their geometry, and environment, the energy of a hydrogen bond can vary between 1 and 40 kcal/mol. This makes them somewhat stronger than a van der Waals interaction, and weaker than fully covalent or ionic bonds. This type of bond can occur in inorganic molecules such as water and in organic molecules like DNA and proteins.

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonding is responsible for the high boiling point of water (100 °C) compared to the other group 16 hydrides that have much weaker hydrogen bonds.[3] Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is partly responsible for the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins and nucleic acids. It also plays an important role in the structure of polymers, both synthetic and natural.

  • Question: Define molar mass of a molecular substance

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    In chemistry, the molar mass M is a physical property defined as the mass of a given substance (chemical element or chemical compound) divided by the amount of substance. The base SI unit for molar mass is kg/mol. However, for historical reasons, molar masses are almost always expressed in g/mol.

    In simple terms, molar mass of a substance is the total weight of that substance (in either kilogram or gram) for one mole of that substance. That is, the weight of a substance for 6.02214076×10^23 molecules or atoms of that substance.

    As an example, the molar mass of water: M(H2O) ≈ 18.015 g/mol.

    Molar mass

    Common symbols

    M

    SI unit

    kg/mol

    Other units

    g/mol

  • Question: What is heterophagic intracellular digestion?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    It is a type of intracellular digestion in which large molecules, brought to the cell from outside by the process of pinocytosis is broken down into smaller substances. The products of digestion either cross the membrane and reach the cytoplasm or remain inside the vacuoles

  • Answer:

    In young leaves xanthophyll requirement is more, therefore, ratio is 1:2.

  • Question: What is a Neoschizomer?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Neoschizomers are type of restriction enzymes which recognize the same nucleotide sequence as their prototype but cleave at a different site

  • Question: What are Homologous chromosomes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    A pair of chromosome which are similar in length, gene position, and centromere location. The position of the genes on each homologous chromosome is the same but the genes may contain different alleles.

  • Question: What is a neuromuscular junction?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    A neuromuscular junction is a chemical synapse formed by the contact between a motor neuron and a muscle fiber

  • Question: What is a nucleoside and nucleotide?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    nucleoside is a nucleic acid base which is linked to a sugar molecule, where as a nucleotide is composed of a nucleoside and one or more phosphate groups.

  • Question: What is 'volant (aerial) adaptations'?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    An adaptation in animals which have an aerial mode of life or spend most of their time flying.

  • Question: What is emphysema?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Emphysema is a chronic lung disease caused by damage to the alveoli, the tiny air sacs in the lung where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place.

  • Question: What is syngamy?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    It is the process of fusion of male and female gamete. It is also known as fertilisation. 

  • Question: Why helium is also called as noble gas?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    They are called the “noble gases” because they they are gases and they do not react with other elements to form complex molecules. This is because their electron orbital(s) are full. Actually, the heavier noble gases have been forced to combine into complex molecules in laboratories.

  • Question: Which one is more acidic phenol or acetic acid?

    Posted in: Chemistry | Date: 11/01/2019

    Answer:

    Acetic acid, (CH3-CO-OH), is a typical carboxylic acid. In carboxylic acids, the release of the OH hydrogen as proton is greatly facilitated by the electron withdrawing carbonyl group. There is no such feature available in phenol, and it mainly depends on the stability of the resultant phenoxide ion to release the OH proton. Hence acetic acid is a much stronger acid than the other.

     

  • Question: What is Photolysis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Breakdown of water molecule into hydrogen and oxygen under the influence of light during photochemical reaction of the photosynthesis.

  • Question: What is vaccination?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Vaccination is a process of administrating vaccine in the body to stimulate an individual's immune system to develop adaptive immunity to a pathogen. 

  • Question: What is autoimmunity?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Autoimmunity is immune responses of an organism against its own healthy cells and tissues. Any disease that results from such an abnormal immune response is called autoimmune disease.

  • Question: What is DNA supercoiling?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    DNA is coiled in the form of a double helix. A bending or twisting of DNA on its axis is known as DNA supercoiling.

  • Question: What is muscle contraction?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Muscle contraction is the activation of tension-generating sites within muscle fibers

  • Question: What is latent period in muscular contraction?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Latent period is also called reaction time. It is the first period of a simple muscle contraction, being the interval between the stimulus being applied and the contraction occurring, usually around 0.01 seconds.

  • Question: What are autorhythmic muscle cells?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    The muscle cells which are capable of contracting spontaneously without nervous or hormonal stimulation are called autorhythmic muscle cells.Examples re cardiac and most smooth muscles.

  • Question: What is brood parasitism ?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Brood parasitism is referred as the laying of one's eggs in the nest of another individual’s nest by some birds. This a reproductive strategy where by parasites foist the cost of rearing their offspring onto another host.

  • Question: What is metastasis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Metastasis is the spread of cancer cells to new areas of the body. It occurs through the lymph system or bloodstream

  • Question: Define phenotypic adaptation.

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Phenotypic adaptation involves changes in the body of an organism in response to genetic mutation or certain environmental changes. These responsive adjustments occur in an organism in order to cope with environmental conditions present in their natural habitats.

  • Question: In which phylum spongocoel is found

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Spongocoel is found in the phylum Porifera

  • Question: What is co-evolution?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Co-evolution is one of the methods by which biological communities are organized. It can lead to very specialized relationships between species, such as those between pollinator and plant and between parasite and host.

  • Question: What is homeostasis?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 12/01/2019

    Answer:

    Homeostasis is the ability of an organism or environment to maintain stability in spite of changes. 

  • Question: Which quantity remains unchanged in isochloric process?

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 22/01/2019

    Answer:

    Volume remain constant in isochoric process.

  • Answer:

    The hard boiled egg will spin for larger duration on a single axis.

  • Question: how does sound wave move through a medium

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 22/01/2019

    Answer:

    It moves through vibration.

  • Question: how does sound wave move through a medium

    Posted in: Physics | Date: 22/01/2019

    Answer:

    It moves through vibration.

  • Question: What is Mri?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of scan that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body. An MRI scan MRI is used to examine parts of the body such as brain, spinal cord, bones, joints, heart and blood vessels.

  • Question: which part of flower form it's fruit

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    After fertilisation ovary becomes fruit

  • Question: What are flame cells?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    A flame cells are specialized excretory cells found in the flatworms

  • Question: What are neurolgia?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    Neuroglia are non-neuronal cells of the nervous system. It is also called glial cells or glia. It acts as glue to neurons.

  • Question: What is synapes?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    Synapses are the junction between two nerve cells, consisting of a minute gap across which impulses pass by diffusion of a neurotransmitter.

  • Question: What are heat shock protiens?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 24/01/2019

    Answer:

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a group of such proteins that bind to such surfaces during assembly of large molecule. It regulates immune responses. 

  • Question: What is Osmoregulation?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 07/02/2019

    Answer:

    Osmoregulation is the process by which an organism regulate water and nuetrients in the body.

  • Question: What is dendrites ?

    Posted in: Biology | Date: 07/02/2019

    Answer:

    Dendrites are projections of a neuron (nerve cell) that receive signals (information) from other neurons.

  • Answer:

    EDRIRL

  • Answer:

    Since pollution control measures are expensive, many industries hesitate to adopt them.

  • Answer:

    Although thre is non-stop gunfire, there is no stiff resistance to the army.

  • Answer:

    The location chosen for construction of the building is in the heart of the city.

  • Question: You ....... worry. I'm a very careful driver.

    Posted in: Bank Clerical | Date: 18/02/2019

    Answer:

    You do not worry, I'm a very careful driver.

  • Question: He ....... her that she would pass.

    Posted in: Bank Clerical | Date: 18/02/2019

    Answer:

    He assured her that she would pass

  • Question: I am sorry ........ the mistake.

    Posted in: Bank Clerical | Date: 18/02/2019

    Answer:

    I am sorry for the mistake.

  • Question: What is miniature?

    Posted in: Social Studies,ACS | Date: 18/02/2019

    Answer:

    Miniature is a model, copy, or similar representation on a very small scale

  • Answer:

    The boy swam across the river and reached the base of the bridge.

  • Answer:

    D. Public

  • Answer:

    Prohibition of Child Marriage Act states that a girl in India can't marry before the age of 18, and a boy before 21

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